United States federal judicial district

federal judicial districtdistrictsfederal judicial districtsjudicial districtsDistrictcircuitsfederal courtfederal judicial district of the United StatesJudicial DistrictSouthern District of Iowa
For purposes of the federal judicial system, Congress has divided the United States into judicial districts.wikipedia
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United States Marshals Service

U.S. MarshalUnited States MarshalU.S. Marshals
Each district also has a United States Marshal who serves the court system.
The USMS as it stands today was established in 1969 to provide guidance and assistance to Marshals throughout the federal judicial districts.

United States Attorney

U.S. AttorneyUnited States District AttorneyU.S. Attorney's Office
Each district has its own United States district court (with a bankruptcy court under its authority), including judges, clerks, court reporters, and other support personnel, all employed by the judicial branch of the government and overseen by the Administrative Office of the Courts in Washington, D.C. There is also a United States Attorney in each district, who acts as the federal government's lawyer in the district, both prosecuting federal criminal cases and defending the government (and its employees) in civil suits against them; the U.S. Attorney is not employed by the judicial branch but by the Department of Justice, part of the executive branch.
One U.S. Attorney is assigned to each of the judicial districts, with the exception of Guam and the Northern Mariana Islands where [[United States Attorney for the Districts of Guam and the Northern Mariana Islands|a single U.S. Attorney]] serves both districts.

United States district court

U.S. District Courtfederal district courtdistrict court
Courts in other insular areas are territorial courts under Article I of the Constitution, not United States district courts, although they have similar jurisdiction.
Each federal judicial district has at least one courthouse, and many districts have more than one.

Federal judiciary of the United States

federal courtfederal courtsUnited States federal court
For purposes of the federal judicial system, Congress has divided the United States into judicial districts.
The United States district courts (one in each of the 94 federal judicial districts, and three territorial courts) are general federal trial courts, although in certain cases Congress has diverted original jurisdiction to specialized courts, such as the Court of International Trade, the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court, the Alien Terrorist Removal Court, or to Article I or Article IV tribunals.

United States territorial court

territorial courtsterritorial courtUnited States territorial courts
Courts in other insular areas are territorial courts under Article I of the Constitution, not United States district courts, although they have similar jurisdiction.
"United States district courts", created under Article III of the U.S. Constitution, exist only in United States federal judicial districts, which are found only in the 50 U.S. states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico.

United States Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit

11th Cir.Eleventh CircuitEleventh Circuit Court of Appeals
The United States Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit (in case citations, 11th Cir.) is a federal court with appellate jurisdiction over the district courts in the following districts:

United States Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit

Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals10th Cir.Tenth Circuit
The United States Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit (in case citations, 10th Cir.) is a federal court with appellate jurisdiction over the district courts in the following districts:

United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit

Second Circuit2d Cir.Second Circuit Court of Appeals
Its territory comprises the states of Connecticut, New York, and Vermont, and the court has appellate jurisdiction over the district courts in the following districts:

United States Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit

Third Circuit Court of Appeals3d Cir.U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit
The United States Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit (in case citations, 3d Cir.) is a federal court with appellate jurisdiction over the district courts for the following districts:

United States bankruptcy court

U.S. Bankruptcy Courtbankruptcy courtUnited States Bankruptcy Judge
Each district has its own United States district court (with a bankruptcy court under its authority), including judges, clerks, court reporters, and other support personnel, all employed by the judicial branch of the government and overseen by the Administrative Office of the Courts in Washington, D.C. There is also a United States Attorney in each district, who acts as the federal government's lawyer in the district, both prosecuting federal criminal cases and defending the government (and its employees) in civil suits against them; the U.S. Attorney is not employed by the judicial branch but by the Department of Justice, part of the executive branch.
Each of the 94 federal judicial districts handles bankruptcy matters.

United States Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit

5th Cir.Fifth CircuitFifth Circuit Court of Appeals
The United States Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit (in case citations, 5th Cir.) is a federal court with appellate jurisdiction over the district courts in the following federal judicial districts:

United States Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit

Fourth Circuit Court of AppealsFourth Circuit4th Cir.
The United States Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit (in case citations, 4th Cir.) is a federal court located in Richmond, Virginia, with appellate jurisdiction over the district courts in the following districts:

United States Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit

6th Cir.Sixth Circuit Court of AppealsSixth Circuit
The United States Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit (in case citations, 6th Cir.) is a federal court with appellate jurisdiction over the district courts in the following districts:

Judicial district

legal districtJudicial partyPartido judicial
For purposes of the federal judicial system, Congress has divided the United States into judicial districts.
For the purpose of the federal judiciary, each state is organized into between one and four judicial districts, which may be further subdivided into divisions.

United States Court of Appeals for the First Circuit

1st Cir.First Circuit Court of AppealsFirst Circuit
The United States Court of Appeals for the First Circuit (in case citations, 1st Cir.) is a federal court with appellate jurisdiction over the district courts in the following districts:

United States Congress

CongressU.S. CongressCongressional
For purposes of the federal judicial system, Congress has divided the United States into judicial districts.

U.S. state

StatestatesU. S. state
There are 94 federal judicial districts, including at least one district in each state, the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico.

Puerto Rico

Puerto RicanCommonwealth of Puerto RicoPuerto Rica
Federal judicial districts have also been established in the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico.

Insular area

U.S. territoriesinsular areasU.S. territory
Courts in other insular areas are territorial courts under Article I of the Constitution, not United States district courts, although they have similar jurisdiction.

Article One of the United States Constitution

Article IArticle OneU.S. Const. art. I
Courts in other insular areas are territorial courts under Article I of the Constitution, not United States district courts, although they have similar jurisdiction.

Constitution of the United States

United States ConstitutionU.S. ConstitutionConstitution
Courts in other insular areas are territorial courts under Article I of the Constitution, not United States district courts, although they have similar jurisdiction.

Administrative Office of the United States Courts

Administrative Office of the U.S. CourtsAdministrative OfficeAdministrative Office of the Courts
Each district has its own United States district court (with a bankruptcy court under its authority), including judges, clerks, court reporters, and other support personnel, all employed by the judicial branch of the government and overseen by the Administrative Office of the Courts in Washington, D.C. There is also a United States Attorney in each district, who acts as the federal government's lawyer in the district, both prosecuting federal criminal cases and defending the government (and its employees) in civil suits against them; the U.S. Attorney is not employed by the judicial branch but by the Department of Justice, part of the executive branch.