United States presidential election

presidential electionpresidential electionsU.S. presidential electionElectoral College votesUnited States presidential electionsU.S. presidential electionsU.S. presidential candidatepresidentialelectionUS presidential election
The election of the president and the vice president of the United States is an indirect election in which citizens of the United States who are registered to vote in one of the fifty U.S. states or in Washington, D.C., cast ballots not directly for those offices, but instead for members of the U.S.wikipedia
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Twenty-third Amendment to the United States Constitution

Twenty-third Amendment23rd Amendment23rd Amendment to the United States Constitution
The candidate who receives an absolute majority of electoral votes (at least 270 out of a total of 538, since the Twenty-Third Amendment granted voting rights to citizens of D.C.) is then elected to that office.
The Twenty-third Amendment (Amendment XXIII) to the United States Constitution extends the right to vote in presidential elections to citizens residing in the District of Columbia.

Unpledged elector

Unpledged Electorsunpledgedunpledged Democratic electors
Once chosen, electors generally cast their electoral votes for the candidate who won the plurality in their state, but at least 21 states do not have provisions that specifically address this behavior; those who vote in opposition to the plurality are known as "faithless" or "unpledged" electors.
In United States presidential elections, an unpledged elector is a person nominated to stand as an elector but who has not pledged to support any particular presidential or vice presidential candidate, and is free to vote for any candidate when elected a member of the Electoral College.

United States presidential nominating convention

U.S. presidential nomination conventionpresidential nominating conventionpresidential nominating conventions
The nomination process, consisting of the primary elections and caucuses and the nominating conventions, was not specified in the Constitution, but was developed over time by the states and political parties.
A United States presidential nominating convention is a political convention held every four years in the United States by most of the political parties who will be fielding nominees in the upcoming U.S. presidential election.

United States presidential primary

presidential primariespresidential primaryprimary
The nomination process, consisting of the primary elections and caucuses and the nominating conventions, was not specified in the Constitution, but was developed over time by the states and political parties.
The presidential primary elections and caucuses held in the various states, the District of Columbia, and territories of the United States form part of the nominating process of candidates for United States presidential elections.

Indirect election

indirectly electedindirectindirect suffrage
The election of the president and the vice president of the United States is an indirect election in which citizens of the United States who are registered to vote in one of the fifty U.S. states or in Washington, D.C., cast ballots not directly for those offices, but instead for members of the U.S. Electoral College, known as electors.

National Popular Vote Interstate Compact

National Popular VoteNational Popular Vote CompactAmar Plan
Another alternate proposal is the National Popular Vote Interstate Compact, an interstate compact whereby individual participating states agree to allocate their electors based on the winner of the national popular vote instead of just their respective statewide results.
The National Popular Vote Interstate Compact (NPVIC) is an agreement among a group of U.S. states and the District of Columbia to award all their electoral votes to whichever presidential candidate wins the overall popular vote in the 50 states and the District of Columbia.

Election Day (United States)

Election DayTuesdaythe same day as federal elections
Presidential elections occur quadrennially with registered voters casting their ballots on Election Day, which since 1845 has been the first Tuesday after November 1.
Presidential elections are held every four years, in years divisible by four, in which electors for President and Vice President are chosen according to the method determined by each state.

Faithless elector

faithless electorsvote of conscienceabstained
Once chosen, electors generally cast their electoral votes for the candidate who won the plurality in their state, but at least 21 states do not have provisions that specifically address this behavior; those who vote in opposition to the plurality are known as "faithless" or "unpledged" electors.
In United States presidential elections, a faithless elector is a member of the United States Electoral College who does not vote for the presidential or vice presidential candidate for whom they had pledged to vote.

Brokered convention

contested conventionopen conventioncontested
If no single candidate has secured a majority of delegates (including both pledged and unpledged), then a "brokered convention" results.
In United States politics, a brokered convention (sometimes referred to as an open convention and closely related to a contested convention) can occur during a presidential election when a political party fails to choose a nominee on the first round of delegate voting at the party's nominating convention.

President-elect of the United States

President-electOffice of the President-ElectVice President-elect
Between the general election and Inauguration Day, this apparent winner is referred to as the "President-elect" (unless it is a sitting President who has won re-election).
The President-elect of the United States is the person who has won the quadrennial presidential election in the United States, but who has not yet been inaugurated as president of the United States.

United States presidential debates

presidential debatespresidential debateUnited States presidential election debates
During presidential election campaigns in the United States, it has become customary for the main candidates (almost always the candidates of the two largest parties, currently the Democratic Party and the Republican Party) to engage in a debate.

United States presidential inauguration

inaugurationInauguration Daypresidential inauguration
Congress then certifies the results in early January, and the presidential term begins on Inauguration Day, which since the passage of the Twentieth Amendment has been set at January 20.
Since 1937, it has taken place at noon EST on January 20, the first day of the new term, some to days after the presidential election, except for three occasions when January 20 fell on a Sunday.

Contingent election

electno candidate receives the minimum 270 electoral votes needed to win the electiontie-breaker by the United States House of Representatives
Specifically, the selection of President would then be decided by a contingent election in a ballot of the House of Representatives.
In the United States, a contingent election is the procedure used in presidential elections in the case where no candidate wins an absolute majority of votes in the Electoral College, the constitutional mechanism for electing the president and the vice president of the United States.

Joint session of the United States Congress

joint session of Congressjoint sessionAddressed U.S. Congress
In early January, the total Electoral College vote count is opened by the sitting Vice President, acting in his capacity as President of the Senate, and read aloud to a joint session of the incoming Congress, which was elected at the same time as the President.
Joint sessions can be held on any special occasion, but are required to be held when the president delivers a State of the Union address, when they gather to count and certify the votes of the Electoral College following a presidential election, or when they convene on the occasion of a presidential inauguration.

2020 United States presidential election

2020 U.S. presidential election2020 presidential election2020
We will see the same results from past elections as well as the ongoing 2020 presidential election.
The 2020 United States presidential election, scheduled for Tuesday, November 3, 2020, will be the 59th quadrennial U.S. presidential election.

1788–89 United States presidential election

17891788–1789 United States presidential electionfirst presidential election
During the first presidential election in 1789, only six of the 13 original states chose electors by any form of popular vote.
The 1788–89 United States presidential election was the first quadrennial presidential election.

Caucus

caucusesparty caucusWomen's Caucus
The primary elections are run by state and local governments, while the caucuses are organized directly by the political parties.
The term caucus is frequently used to discuss the procedures used by some states to select presidential nominees such as the Iowa caucuses, the first of the modern presidential election cycle, and the Texas caucuses.

Swing state

swing statesbattleground statebattleground states
This encourages presidential candidates to focus exponentially more time, money, and energy campaigning in a few so-called "swing states", states in which no single candidate or party has overwhelming support.
The battlegrounds may change in certain election cycles, and may be reflected in overall polling, demographics, and the ideological appeal of the nominees.

1792 United States presidential election

17921792 election1792 presidential election
The 1792 United States presidential election was the second quadrennial presidential election.

1796 United States presidential election

17961796 presidential election1796 election
Since the election of his successor, John Adams, in 1796, all winners of U.S. presidential elections have represented one of two major parties.
The 1796 United States presidential election was the third quadrennial presidential election.

Political parties in the United States

political partiespolitical partypolitical party in the United States
The nomination process, consisting of the primary elections and caucuses and the nominating conventions, was not specified in the Constitution, but was developed over time by the states and political parties.
These two parties have won every United States presidential election since 1852 and have controlled the United States Congress to some extent since at least 1856.

U.S. state

StatestatesU. S. state
The election of the president and the vice president of the United States is an indirect election in which citizens of the United States who are registered to vote in one of the fifty U.S. states or in Washington, D.C., cast ballots not directly for those offices, but instead for members of the U.S. Electoral College, known as electors.
When casting ballots in presidential elections they are voting for presidential electors, who then, using procedures provided in the 12th amendment, elect the president and vice president.

1800 United States presidential election

18001800 presidential electionelection of 1800
This presented a problem during the presidential election of 1800 when Aaron Burr received the same number of electoral votes as Thomas Jefferson and challenged Jefferson's election to the office.
The 1800 United States presidential election was the fourth United States presidential election.

1804 United States presidential election

18041804 presidential election1804 election
The 1804 United States presidential election was the fifth quadrennial presidential election, held from Friday, November 2, to Wednesday, December 5, 1804.

1808 United States presidential election

18081808 presidential election1808 election
The 1808 United States presidential election was the sixth quadrennial presidential election, held from Friday, November 4, to Wednesday, December 7, 1808.