A report on United States presidential election

A 2016 general election ballot, listing the presidential and vice presidential candidates
Comparison of the popular vote totals since 1900.
The hand-written copy of the natural-born-citizen clause as it appeared in 1787
A 2008 Democratic caucus meeting in Iowa City, Iowa. The Iowa caucuses are traditionally the first major electoral event of presidential primaries and caucuses.
Madison Square Garden in New York City, the site of the 1976, 1980, and 1992 Democratic National Conventions; and the 2004 Republican National Convention.
The floor of the 2008 Republican National Convention at the Xcel Energy Center in Saint Paul, Minnesota.
A Texas voter about to mark a selection for president on a ballot, 2008 Election Day
2020 Election
John Adams was the first of 26 presidents who have been lawyers.
Popular vote percentage
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2016 Election

Indirect election in which citizens of the United States who are registered to vote in one of the fifty U.S. states or in Washington, D.C., cast ballots not directly for those offices, but instead for members of the Electoral College.

- United States presidential election
A 2016 general election ballot, listing the presidential and vice presidential candidates

59 related topics with Alpha

Overall

Electoral votes, out of 538, allocated to each state and the District of Columbia for presidential elections to be held in 2024 and 2028, based on representation, which depends on population data from the 2020 census. Every jurisdiction is entitled to at least 3.

United States Electoral College

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Group of presidential electors required by the Constitution to form every four years for the sole purpose of appointing the president and vice president.

Group of presidential electors required by the Constitution to form every four years for the sole purpose of appointing the president and vice president.

Electoral votes, out of 538, allocated to each state and the District of Columbia for presidential elections to be held in 2024 and 2028, based on representation, which depends on population data from the 2020 census. Every jurisdiction is entitled to at least 3.
In the 2020 presidential election (held using 2010 census data) Joe Biden received 306 and Donald Trump 232 of the total 538 electoral votes.
In Maine (upper-right) and Nebraska (center), the small circled numbers indicate congressional districts. These are the only two states to use a district method for some of their allocated electors, instead of a complete winner-takes-all.
Cases of certificates of the electoral college votes confirming the results of the 2020 US election, after they had been removed from the House Chambers by congressional staff during the 2021 U.S. Capitol attack.
After the popular election in November, a state's Certificate of Ascertainment officially announces the state's electors for the Electoral College. The appointed Electoral College members later meet in the state capital in December to cast their votes.
Population per electoral vote for each state and Washington, D.C. (2010 census). By 2020 estimates, a single elector could represent more than 700,000 people or under 200,000.
When the state's electors meet in December, they cast their ballots and record their vote on a Certificate of Vote, which is then sent to the U.S. Congress. (From the election of 1876)
This cartogram shows the number of electors from each state for the 2012, 2016 and 2020 presidential elections. Following the 2010 Census, New York and Ohio lost two electoral votes, 8 states lost one, 6 states gained one, Florida gained two, and Texas gained four.
This graphic demonstrates how the winner of the popular vote can still lose in an electoral college system similar to the U.S. Electoral College.
Bar graph of popular votes in presidential elections (through 2020). Black stars mark the five cases where the winner did not have the plurality of the popular vote. Black squares mark the two cases where the electoral vote resulted in a tie, or the winner did not have the majority of electoral votes. An H marks each of two cases where the election was decided by the House; an S marks the one case where the election was finalized by the Supreme Court.
These maps show the amount of attention given to each state by the Bush and Kerry campaigns (combined) during the final five weeks of the 2004 election: each waving hand (purple map) represents a visit from a presidential or vice presidential candidate; each dollar sign (green map) represents one million dollars spent on TV advertising.
Half the U.S. population lives in 143 urban / suburban counties out of 3,143 counties or county equivalents (2019 American Community Survey)

Almost 10% of presidential elections under the system have not elected the winners of the nationwide popular vote.

2016 United States presidential election

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The incumbent in 2016, Barack Obama. His second term expired at noon on January 20, 2017.
Campaign signs of third-party candidates Jill Stein and Gary Johnson, October 2016 in St. Johnsbury, Vermont
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A general election ballot, listing the presidential and vice presidential candidates
Trump campaigns in Phoenix, Arizona, October 29, 2016
Clinton campaigns in Raleigh, North Carolina, October 22, 2016
President Barack Obama casting his vote early in Chicago on October 7, 2016
Vote margin swing by state 2012 to 2016. Only twelve states (as well as the District of Columbia and Nebraka's 2nd congressional district) shifted more Democratic. The large swing in Utah is mostly due to the votes for third candidate Evan McMullin and the 2012 candidacy of Utah's Mitt Romney.
Final polling averages for the 2016 election by state. Polls from lightly shaded states are older than September 1, 2016.
Results by state, shaded according to winning candidate's percentage of the vote
Results by vote distribution among states. The size of each state's pie chart is proportional to its number of electoral votes.
Results by county. Red denotes counties that went to Trump; blue denotes counties that went to Clinton.
Results by county, shaded according to winning candidate's percentage of the vote
A discontinuous cartogram of the 2016 United States presidential election
A continuous cartogram of the 2016 United States presidential election
A discretized cartogram of the 2016 United States presidential election using squares
A discretized cartogram of the 2016 United States presidential election using hexagons
Results of election by congressional district, shaded by winning candidate's percentage of the vote
County swing from 2012 to 2016
Results by county, shaded according to percentage of the vote for Johnson
Results by county, shaded according to percentage of the vote for Jill Stein
Results by state, shaded according to margin of victory

The 2016 United States presidential election was the 58th quadrennial presidential election, held on Tuesday, November 8, 2016.

2000 United States presidential election

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The incumbent in 2000, Bill Clinton. His second term expired at noon on January 20, 2001.
Palm Beach County recount
2000 Palm Beach County voting stand and ballot box
Florida Supreme Court during the recount
Gore-Lieberman supporters outside the U.S. Supreme Court
Writer Harry Browne
Art Olivier
Results by county, shaded according to winning candidate's percentage of the vote.
Vote share by county for Green Party candidate Ralph Nader. Darker shades indicate a stronger Green performance.
Election results by county.
Election results by congressional district.

The 2000 United States presidential election was the 54th quadrennial presidential election, held on Tuesday, November 7, 2000.

List of United States presidential elections in which the winner lost the popular vote

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There have been five United States presidential elections in which the successful presidential candidate did not receive a plurality of the popular vote, including the 1824 election, which was the first U.S. presidential election where the popular vote was recorded.

State races by 2020 United States presidential election margin.

Swing state

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State races by 2020 United States presidential election margin.

In American politics, the term swing state (or battleground state) refers to any state that could reasonably be won by either the Democratic or Republican candidate in a statewide election, most often referring to presidential elections, by a swing in votes.

Faithless elector laws by state 
Vote voided with penalty
Vote voided
Vote counted with penalty
Vote counted
No law

Faithless elector

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Elector who does not vote for the candidates for U.S. President and U.S. Vice President for whom the elector had pledged to vote, and instead votes for another person for one or both offices or abstains from voting.

Elector who does not vote for the candidates for U.S. President and U.S. Vice President for whom the elector had pledged to vote, and instead votes for another person for one or both offices or abstains from voting.

Faithless elector laws by state 
Vote voided with penalty
Vote voided
Vote counted with penalty
Vote counted
No law

As part of United States presidential elections, each state selects the method by which its electors are to be selected, which in modern times has been based on a popular vote in most states, and generally requires its electors to have pledged to vote for the candidates of their party if appointed.

1876 United States presidential election

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The election was hotly contested, as can be seen by this poster, which was published in 1877.
A certificate for the electoral vote for Rutherford B. Hayes and William A. Wheeler for the State of Louisiana
"A truce – not a compromise, but a chance for high-toned gentlemen to retire gracefully from their very civil declarations of war." By Thomas Nast in Harper's Weekly, 1877 Feb 17, p. 132.
Results by county explicitly indicating the percentage of the winning candidate in each county. Shades of blue are for Tilden (Democratic), and shades of red are for Hayes (Republican).
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Governor Rutherford B. Hayes of Ohio
Senator James G. Blaine from Maine
Secretary of the Treasury Benjamin Bristow
Senator Oliver P. Morton from Indiana
Senator Roscoe Conkling from New York
Governor John F. Hartranft of Pennsylvania
Postmaster General Marshall Jewell
Ambassador Elihu B. Washburne from Illinois
Representative
Secretary of State
President Ulysses S. Grant<ref>Presidential election of 1876</ref><ref>{{Cite web |url=http://www.grantstomb.org/news/3t13.html |title=Was Grant a candidate? |access-date=June 30, 2014 |archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20180210065334/http://www.grantstomb.org/news/3t13.html |archive-date=February 10, 2018 |url-status=dead }}</ref>
1st Presidential Ballot
2nd Presidential Ballot
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7th Presidential Ballot
Recorded Vice Presidential Ballot
Governor Thomas A. Hendricks of Indiana
Major General Winfield Scott Hancock from Pennsylvania
William Allen from Ohio
Senator Thomas F. Bayard from Delaware
Joel Parker from New Jersey
<center>'''1st Presidential Ballot
<center>'''1st Presidential Ballot
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Philanthropist Peter Cooper from New York
Andrew Curtin from Pennsylvania
Alexander Campbell from Illinois
Results by county, shaded according to winning candidate's percentage of the vote
Map of presidential election results by county
Map of Democratic presidential election results by county
Map of Republican presidential election results by county
Map of "other" presidential election results by county
Cartogram of presidential election results by county
Cartogram of Democratic presidential election results by county
Cartogram of Republican presidential election results by county
Cartogram of "other" presidential election results by county

The 1876 United States presidential election was the 23rd quadrennial presidential election, held on Tuesday, November 7, 1876 in which Republican nominee Rutherford B. Hayes faced Democrat Samuel J. Tilden.

2016 presidential primary election ballots in Massachusetts

United States presidential primary

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2016 presidential primary election ballots in Massachusetts
Voters checking in at a 2008 Washington State Democratic caucus held at the Nathan Eckstein Middle School in Seattle
A 2008 Washington state Democratic caucus held in the school lunchroom of Eckstein Middle School in Seattle. In some states like Washington, voters attend local meetings run by the parties instead of polling places to cast their selections.
A 2008 Democratic caucus meeting in Iowa City, Iowa. The Iowa caucuses are traditionally the first major electoral event of presidential primaries and caucuses.
The Balsams Grand Resort Hotel in Dixville Notch, New Hampshire, the site of the first "midnight vote" in the New Hampshire primary.

The presidential primary elections and caucuses held in the various states, the District of Columbia, and territories of the United States form part of the nominating process of candidates for United States presidential elections.

The 1876 Democratic National Convention at the Merchants Exchange Building in St. Louis, Missouri. Samuel J. Tilden and Thomas A. Hendricks were nominated for president and vice president respectively

United States presidential nominating convention

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The 1876 Democratic National Convention at the Merchants Exchange Building in St. Louis, Missouri. Samuel J. Tilden and Thomas A. Hendricks were nominated for president and vice president respectively
The 2008 Green Party National Convention held in Chicago. Various third parties also hold their own national conventions.
The Louisiana Superdome in New Orleans was the site of the 1988 Republican National Convention, which nominated George H.W. Bush and Dan Quayle for president and vice president. In recent decades, the two major parties have held their conventions at sports stadiums and arenas.
Roll call of states during the 2008 Democratic National Convention at the Pepsi Center in Denver, Colorado.
The floor of the 2008 Republican National Convention at the Xcel Energy Center in Saint Paul, Minnesota.
First Lady Pat Nixon speaking at the 1972 Republican National Convention. She was the first Republican First Lady to do what is now considered common practice.
Michelle Obama speaking at the 2008 Democratic National Convention.
Barack Obama and Joe Biden appear together at the 2008 Democratic National Convention.
Primary foes Ronald Reagan (left) and Gerald Ford (right) shake hands during the 1976 Republican National Convention, the last major party convention whose outcome was in doubt.
News anchor Ted Koppel (pictured in 2002), who midway through the 1996 Republican National Convention told viewers that he was going home because it has become "more of an infomercial than a news event."

A United States presidential nominating convention is a political convention held every four years in the United States by most of the political parties who will be fielding nominees in the upcoming U.S. presidential election.

1888 United States presidential election

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Grover Cleveland-Benjamin Harrison presidential (1888) campaign poster about the trade policy of the two candidates. The map supports the work of the Harrison campaign.
Tariff reform was the main issue of the election.
Map of presidential election results by county
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Business advertising card with an election theme
Results by county, shaded according to winning candidate's percentage of the vote
Map of Democratic presidential election results by county
Map of Republican presidential election results by county
Map of "other" presidential election results by county
Cartogram of presidential election results by county
Cartogram of Democratic presidential election results by county
Cartogram of Republican presidential election results by county
Cartogram of "other" presidential election results by county

The 1888 United States presidential election was the 26th quadrennial presidential election, held on Tuesday, November 6, 1888.