United States presidential elections in which the winner lost the popular vote

losing the nationwide popular votewin an outright majority of the popular voteand won the popular vote by two percentdespite winning a greater share of the popular votedespite winning a plurality or majority of the popular voteearned the most popular votesfirst time in over a centuryHillary Clinton losing the Electoral College in 2016in which the winner lost the popular votelose the popular vote
There have been five United States presidential elections in which the winner lost the popular vote including the 1824 election, which was the first U.S. presidential election where the popular vote was recorded.wikipedia
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1824 United States presidential election

18241824 presidential election1824 election
There have been five United States presidential elections in which the winner lost the popular vote including the 1824 election, which was the first U.S. presidential election where the popular vote was recorded.
It was the first election in which the winner did not achieve at least a plurality of the national popular vote.

2000 United States presidential election

20002000 presidential electionPresident
The presidential elections of 1876, 1888, 2000, and 2016 produced an Electoral College winner who did not receive the most votes in the general election. The 2000 presidential election pitted Republican candidate George W. Bush (the incumbent governor of Texas and son of former president George H. W. Bush) against Democratic candidate Al Gore (the incumbent vice president of the United States under Bill Clinton).
It was the fourth of five presidential elections in which the winning candidate lost the popular vote, and is considered one of the closest elections in US history.

1876 United States presidential election

18761876 presidential electionpresidential election of 1876
The presidential elections of 1876, 1888, 2000, and 2016 produced an Electoral College winner who did not receive the most votes in the general election.
The 1876 election is the second of five presidential elections in which the person who won the most popular votes did not win the election, and the only such election in which the popular vote winner received a majority (rather than a plurality) of the popular vote.

2016 United States presidential election

20162016 presidential election2016 U.S. presidential election
The presidential elections of 1876, 1888, 2000, and 2016 produced an Electoral College winner who did not receive the most votes in the general election. The 2016 presidential election featured Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton (former U.S. Senator from New York, Secretary of State, and First Lady to President Bill Clinton) and Republican nominee Donald Trump, a businessman (owner of the Trump Organization) from New York City.
Trump is the fifth person in U.S. history to become president while losing the nationwide popular vote.

Samuel J. Tilden

Samuel TildenTildenSamuel Jones Tilden
The result of the election remains among the most disputed ever, although there is no question that Democrat Samuel J. Tilden of New York outpolled Ohio's Republican Rutherford B. Hayes in the popular vote, with Tilden winning 4,288,546 votes and Hayes winning 4,034,311.
He was the first individual to win an outright majority of the popular vote in a United States presidential election but lose the election itself, though four other candidates have lost a presidential election despite garnering a plurality of the popular vote.

George W. Bush

BushPresident BushPresident George W. Bush
The 2000 presidential election pitted Republican candidate George W. Bush (the incumbent governor of Texas and son of former president George H. W. Bush) against Democratic candidate Al Gore (the incumbent vice president of the United States under Bill Clinton).
He became the fourth person to be elected president while receiving fewer popular votes than his opponent.

1960 United States presidential election in Alabama

1960Alabama1960 United States presidential election
The true national popular vote total was also uncertain in the 1960 election, and the plurality winner depends on how votes for Alabama electors are allocated.
* [[United States presidential elections in which the winner lost the popular vote#1960 Alabama results ambiguity]]

United States presidential election

presidential electionpresidential electionsU.S. presidential election
There have been five United States presidential elections in which the winner lost the popular vote including the 1824 election, which was the first U.S. presidential election where the popular vote was recorded.

Donald Trump

TrumpPresident TrumpPresident Donald Trump
The 2016 presidential election featured Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton (former U.S. Senator from New York, Secretary of State, and First Lady to President Bill Clinton) and Republican nominee Donald Trump, a businessman (owner of the Trump Organization) from New York City.
Trump received a smaller share of the popular vote than Clinton, which made him the fifth person to be elected president while losing the popular vote.

List of United States presidential elections by popular vote margin

popular votepopular vote marginmajority of the popular vote
Thus it is possible for the winner of the popular vote to end up losing the election, an outcome that has occurred on five occasions, most recently in the 2016 election.

United States' presidential plurality victories

The elections of 1824, 1876, 1888, 2000, and 2016 are not on this list because in those elections the winning candidate actually received less than a plurality.

National Popular Vote Interstate Compact

National Popular VoteNational Popular Vote CompactAmar Plan
Although in all four elections since 1876 in which the winner lost the popular vote, the Republican became president, Silver's analysis shows that such splits are about equally likely to favor either major party.

John F. Kennedy

KennedyPresident KennedyJohn Kennedy
In the 1960 United States presidential election, Democratic candidate John F. Kennedy defeated Republican candidate Richard Nixon.
In the national popular vote, [[United States presidential elections in which the winner lost the popular vote#1960 Alabama results ambiguity|by most accounts]], Kennedy led Nixon by just two-tenths of one percent (49.7% to 49.5%), while in the Electoral College, he won 303 votes to Nixon's 219 (269 were needed to win).

Plurality voting

majority votefirst past the postsingle-member
There have been five United States presidential elections in which the winner lost the popular vote including the 1824 election, which was the first U.S. presidential election where the popular vote was recorded.

Direct election

popular votedirectly electeddirect
There have been five United States presidential elections in which the winner lost the popular vote including the 1824 election, which was the first U.S. presidential election where the popular vote was recorded.

Majority

simple majoritymajority voteabsolute majority
Losing the popular vote means securing less of the national popular vote than the person who received either a majority or a plurality of the vote.

Plurality (voting)

pluralityrelative majoritysimple majority
Losing the popular vote means securing less of the national popular vote than the person who received either a majority or a plurality of the vote.

President of the United States

PresidentU.S. PresidentUnited States President
In the U.S. presidential election system, instead of the nationwide popular vote determining the outcome of the election, the president of the United States is determined by votes cast by electors of the Electoral College.

United States Electoral College

Electoral Collegepresidential electorelectoral votes
In the U.S. presidential election system, instead of the nationwide popular vote determining the outcome of the election, the president of the United States is determined by votes cast by electors of the Electoral College.

Supermajority

absolute majoritytwo-thirds majorityqualified majority
Alternatively, if no candidate receives an absolute majority of electoral votes, the election is determined by the House of Representatives.

United States House of Representatives

U.S. RepresentativeU.S. House of RepresentativesUnited States Representative
Alternatively, if no candidate receives an absolute majority of electoral votes, the election is determined by the House of Representatives.

Twelfth Amendment to the United States Constitution

Twelfth Amendment12th Amendment12th Amendment to the US Constitution
These procedures are governed by the Twelfth Amendment to the United States Constitution.

1888 United States presidential election

18881888 presidential election1888 election
The presidential elections of 1876, 1888, 2000, and 2016 produced an Electoral College winner who did not receive the most votes in the general election.