United we stand, divided we fall

Together we stand, divided we fallUnited We StandUNITED WE STAND DIVIDED WE FALLuniting we stand, by dividing we fall
"United we stand, divided we fall" is a phrase used in many different kinds of mottos, most often to inspire unity and collaboration.wikipedia
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Isaac Shelby

Issac ShelbyCol. Isaac ShelbyShelby, Isaac, Col
The U.S. state of Kentucky's first governor, Isaac Shelby, was particularly fond of the stanza from "The Liberty Song".
His fondness for John Dickinson's "The Liberty Song" is believed to be the reason Kentucky adopted the state motto "United we stand, divided we fall".

List of U.S. state and territory mottos

state mottoMottoState mottos
Since 1942, this phrase has been the official non-Latin state motto of Kentucky.

Motto

heraldic mottomottosmottoes
"United we stand, divided we fall" is a phrase used in many different kinds of mottos, most often to inspire unity and collaboration.

The Liberty Song

Liberty Song
The first attributed use in modern times is to Founding Father John Dickinson in his pre-Revolutionary War song "The Liberty Song", first published in the Boston Gazette in July 1768.
Dickinson's sixth verse offers the earliest known publication of the phrase that parallels the motto "united we stand, divided we fall", a patriotic slogan that has prominently appeared several times throughout U.S. history.

Kentucky

KYCommonwealth of KentuckyKentuckian
The U.S. state of Kentucky's first governor, Isaac Shelby, was particularly fond of the stanza from "The Liberty Song". Since 1942, this phrase has been the official non-Latin state motto of Kentucky.

Collaboration

collaborativecollaboratecollaborated
"United we stand, divided we fall" is a phrase used in many different kinds of mottos, most often to inspire unity and collaboration.

Collectivism

collectivistcollectivisticcollective
Its core concept lies in the collectivist notion that if individual members of a certain group with binding ideals – such as a union, coalition, confederation or alliance – work on their own instead of as a team, they are each doomed to fail and will all be defeated.

Political union

unionreunificationstate union
Its core concept lies in the collectivist notion that if individual members of a certain group with binding ideals – such as a union, coalition, confederation or alliance – work on their own instead of as a team, they are each doomed to fail and will all be defeated.

Coalition

coalitionscoalition forcesStop Climate Chaos
Its core concept lies in the collectivist notion that if individual members of a certain group with binding ideals – such as a union, coalition, confederation or alliance – work on their own instead of as a team, they are each doomed to fail and will all be defeated.

Confederation

confederacyconfederalconfederalism
Its core concept lies in the collectivist notion that if individual members of a certain group with binding ideals – such as a union, coalition, confederation or alliance – work on their own instead of as a team, they are each doomed to fail and will all be defeated.

Military alliance

alliancealliancesAllied
Its core concept lies in the collectivist notion that if individual members of a certain group with binding ideals – such as a union, coalition, confederation or alliance – work on their own instead of as a team, they are each doomed to fail and will all be defeated.

Ancient Greek

GreekClassical GreekGr.
The phrase has been attributed to the ancient Greek storyteller Aesop, both directly in his fable "The Four Oxen and the Lion" and indirectly in "The Bundle of Sticks".

Aesop

AesopusÆsopAes'''o'''p
The phrase has been attributed to the ancient Greek storyteller Aesop, both directly in his fable "The Four Oxen and the Lion" and indirectly in "The Bundle of Sticks".

New Testament

NewThe New TestamentNew Testaments
A similar phrase also appears in the biblical New Testament – translated into English from the historic Greek in Mark 3:25 as "And if a house be divided against itself, that house cannot stand".

Koine Greek

GreekKoineNew Testament Greek
A similar phrase also appears in the biblical New Testament – translated into English from the historic Greek in Mark 3:25 as "And if a house be divided against itself, that house cannot stand".

Gospel of Mark

MarkMark's GospelGospel according to Mark
A similar phrase also appears in the biblical New Testament – translated into English from the historic Greek in Mark 3:25 as "And if a house be divided against itself, that house cannot stand".

Gospel of Matthew

MatthewMatthew's GospelGospel according to Matthew
Similar verses of the New Testament include Matthew 12:25 ("And Jesus knew their thoughts, and said unto them, Every kingdom divided against itself is brought to desolation; and every city or house divided against itself shall not stand") and Luke 11:17 ("But he, knowing their thoughts, said unto them, Every kingdom divided against itself is brought to desolation; and a house divided against a house falleth.").

Luke 11

chapter 11Luke 11:17
Similar verses of the New Testament include Matthew 12:25 ("And Jesus knew their thoughts, and said unto them, Every kingdom divided against itself is brought to desolation; and every city or house divided against itself shall not stand") and Luke 11:17 ("But he, knowing their thoughts, said unto them, Every kingdom divided against itself is brought to desolation; and a house divided against a house falleth.").

Encyclopædia Britannica

BritannicaEncyclopedia BritannicaEncyclopaedia Britannica
The 1911 Encyclopaedia Britannica quotes Robert Grosseteste ( d. 1253) saying "It is written that united we stand and divided we fall."

Robert Grosseteste

GrossetesteGrosseteste, RobertBishop Grosseteste
The 1911 Encyclopaedia Britannica quotes Robert Grosseteste ( d. 1253) saying "It is written that united we stand and divided we fall."

Founding Fathers of the United States

Founding FathersFounding FatherFounding Father of the United States
The first attributed use in modern times is to Founding Father John Dickinson in his pre-Revolutionary War song "The Liberty Song", first published in the Boston Gazette in July 1768.

John Dickinson

Dickinson[John] DickinsonJohn Dickinson (delegate)
The first attributed use in modern times is to Founding Father John Dickinson in his pre-Revolutionary War song "The Liberty Song", first published in the Boston Gazette in July 1768.

American Revolutionary War

Revolutionary WarAmerican War of IndependenceAmerican Revolution
The first attributed use in modern times is to Founding Father John Dickinson in his pre-Revolutionary War song "The Liberty Song", first published in the Boston Gazette in July 1768.

Boston Gazette

Boston ''GazetteThe Boston Gazette and Country Journal
The first attributed use in modern times is to Founding Father John Dickinson in his pre-Revolutionary War song "The Liberty Song", first published in the Boston Gazette in July 1768.