University of California, Berkeley

View from Memorial Glade of Sather Tower (the Campanile), the center of Berkeley—the ring of its bells and clock can be heard from all over campus.
Sather Tower (the Campanile) looking out over the San Francisco Bay and Mount Tamalpais
Wheeler Hall, home to Berkeley's largest lecture hall, was the location of a Nobel Prize conferral during WWII.
The interior of the Hearst Mining Building, dedicated by Phoebe Hearst in honor of her late husband, George.
Doe Memorial Library is Berkeley's main library
The Haas School of Business offers both graduate and undergraduate degrees
The on-campus University of California Museum of Paleontology hosts a life-size replica of a T-rex.
Simplified evolution of Unix systems and BSD forks
Sather Gate, connecting Sproul Plaza to the inner campus, was a center of the Free Speech Movement.
Bancroft Library, Berkeley's primary special-collections library
The UC Botanical Garden, located in the Berkeley Hills and by the Berkeley Lab.
South Hall (1873), one of the two original buildings of the University of California, still stands on the Berkeley campus
The south fork of Strawberry Creek, as seen between Dwinelle Hall and Lower Sproul Plaza.
Fans atop Tightwad Hill watch the Cal Band, with views of the stadium and the San Francisco Bay.
The International House was opened in 1930 with the funding of John D. Rockefeller.
Bowles Hall, a co-ed residential college, neighbors the Hearst Greek Theatre.
Wellness Room sleep pods: part of a program created by the ASUC, UC Berkeley's official student association
Berkeley Dance Marathon, one of the campus's student-led fundraising events
Zellerbach Hall, home of the Cal Performances theater group
UC Berkeley Symphony Orchestra
The base of the California Memorial Stadium.
The interior of Haas Pavilion during a Cal Basketball game.
The Cal Bears face off against the Stanford Cardinal in the Big Game.
Cal Rugby football team has not only won at least 26 national championships but many more 'Scrum Axe' competitions (where a ceremonial Native American battle axe affixed to a trophy is awarded to winner) such that by the 1930s it was designated as the annual trophy exchanged between Cal and Stanford Rugby teams
Earl Warren, BA 1912, JD 1914, 14th Chief Justice of the United States, 30th Governor of California
Steven Chu, PhD 1976, Nobel laureate, 12th United States Secretary of Energy
Jennifer Granholm, BA 1984, 16th United States Secretary of Energy, 47th Governor of Michigan
Zulfikar Ali Bhutto, BA 1950,<ref>{{cite web|title=Zulfikar Ali Bhutto|publisher=Encyclopædia Britannica Online|url=http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/64265/Zulfikar-Ali-Bhutto}}</ref> 4th President of Pakistan, 9th Prime Minister of Pakistan
Robert Reich, Professor of Public Policy, 22nd United States Secretary of Labor
Christina Romer, Professor of Economics, 25th Chairperson of the President's Council of Economic Advisers
Steve Wozniak, BS 1986, cofounder of Apple Inc.
Gordon Moore, BS 1950, cofounder of semiconductor company Intel
Eric Schmidt, MS 1979, PhD 1982, Executive Chairman of Alphabet
Edmund Gerald "Jerry" Brown, Jr, BA 1961, 34th & 39th Governor of California
Blake R. Van Leer, MS 1920, inventor, civil rights advocate, president of Georgia Tech
Gregory Peck, BA 1939, Academy Award–winning actor
Natalie Coughlin, BA 2005, multiple gold medal-winning Olympic swimmer
Haakon, Crown Prince of Norway, heir apparent to the throne of Norway, BA 1999<ref>"Her Norwegian heritage drew her to projects with the Norwegian Consulate in San Francisco and the Norwegian American Cultural Society, and she hosted a party for Crown Prince Haakon Magnus when he graduated from UC Berkeley in 1999."{{cite news|title=Sigrun Corrigan, Bay Area arts patron, dies|author=Carolyne Zinko|date=July 3, 2008|publisher=San Francisco Chronicle|url=http://articles.sfgate.com/2008-07-03/bay-area/17174224_1_mrs-corrigan-lsi-logic-ballet-san-jose}}</ref>
Robert McNamara, BA 1937, 5th President of World Bank, 8th United States Secretary of Defense, President of Ford Motor Company
Daniel Kahneman, PhD 1961, awarded the 2002 Nobel Memorial Prize in Economics for his work in Prospect theory
Harold Urey, PhD 1923, Nobel laureate and discoverer of deuterium
The computer mouse was invented by Turing Award laureate Doug Engelbart, BEng 1952, PhD 1955
President of Colombia, Pedro Nel Ospina Vázquez
Robert Laughlin, BA 1972, Nobel laureate
Turing Award laureate Ken Thompson (left), BS 1965, MS 1966, and fellow laureate and colleague Dennis Ritchie (right), created Unix together
Robert Penn Warren, MA 1927 – novelist and poet, who received the Pulitzer Prize three times
Emmy and Golden Globe Award–winning actress Kathy Baker, BA 1977

Public land-grant research university in Berkeley, California.

- University of California, Berkeley

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Memorial to the Free Speech Movement at UC Berkeley

Free Speech Movement

Memorial to the Free Speech Movement at UC Berkeley
Mario Savio leading a rally on the steps of Sproul Hall in 1966
Free Speech Monument, Sproul Plaza, Berkeley, California

The Free Speech Movement (FSM) was a massive, long-lasting student protest which took place during the 1964–65 academic year on the campus of the University of California, Berkeley.

Aerial view

Los Alamos National Laboratory

United States Department of Energy national laboratory initially organized during World War II for the design of nuclear weapons as part of the Manhattan Project.

United States Department of Energy national laboratory initially organized during World War II for the design of nuclear weapons as part of the Manhattan Project.

Aerial view
Aerial view
The first stages of the explosion of the Trinity nuclear test.

In 1952, the Atomic Energy Commission formed a second design lab under the direction of the University of California, Berkeley, becoming the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL).

Association of American Universities

Organization of American research universities devoted to maintaining a strong system of academic research and education.

Organization of American research universities devoted to maintaining a strong system of academic research and education.

Lack of standardization damaged European universities' opinions of their American counterparts and many American students attended graduate school in Europe instead of staying in the U.S. The presidents of Harvard University, Columbia University, Johns Hopkins University, the University of Chicago, and the University of California sent a letter of invitation to nine other universities—Clark University, Catholic University of America, Cornell University, the University of Michigan, Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, Stanford University, the University of Wisconsin, and Yale University—to meet in Chicago in February 1900 to promote and raise standards.

The Trinity test of the Manhattan Project on 16 July 1945 was the first detonation of a nuclear weapon.

Manhattan Project

Research and development undertaking during World War II that produced the first nuclear weapons.

Research and development undertaking during World War II that produced the first nuclear weapons.

The Trinity test of the Manhattan Project on 16 July 1945 was the first detonation of a nuclear weapon.
Enrico Fermi, John R. Dunning, and Dana P. Mitchell in front of the cyclotron in the basement of Pupin Hall at Columbia University
March 1940 meeting at Berkeley, California: Ernest O. Lawrence, Arthur H. Compton, Vannevar Bush, James B. Conant, Karl T. Compton, and Alfred L. Loomis
Different fission bomb assembly methods explored during the July 1942 conference
Manhattan Project Organization Chart, 1 May 1946
Oppenheimer and Groves at the remains of the Trinity test in September 1945, two months after the test blast and just after the end of World War II. The white overshoes prevented fallout from sticking to the soles of their shoes.
Groves confers with James Chadwick, the head of the British Mission.
Shift change at the Y-12 uranium enrichment facility at the Clinton Engineer Works in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, on 11 August 1945. By May 1945, 82,000 people were employed at the Clinton Engineer Works. Photograph by the Manhattan District photographer Ed Westcott.
Physicists at a Manhattan District-sponsored colloquium at the Los Alamos Laboratory on the Super in April 1946. In the front row are Norris Bradbury, John Manley, Enrico Fermi and J. (Jerome) M. B. Kellogg (1905-1981). Robert Oppenheimer, in dark coat, is behind Manley; to Oppenheimer's left is Richard Feynman. The Army officer on the left is Colonel Oliver Haywood.
Map of Los Alamos site, New Mexico, 1943–45
Hanford workers collect their paychecks at the Western Union office.
The majority of the uranium used in the Manhattan Project came from the Shinkolobwe mine in Belgian Congo.
Oak Ridge hosted several uranium separation technologies. The Y-12 electromagnetic separation plant is in the upper right. The K-25 and K-27 gaseous diffusion plants are in the lower left, near the S-50 thermal diffusion plant. The X-10 was for plutonium production.
Alpha I racetrack at Y-12
Calutron Girls were young women who monitored calutron control panels at Y-12. Gladys Owens, seated in the foreground, was unaware of what she had been involved in.
Oak Ridge K-25 plant
The S-50 plant is the dark building to the upper left behind the Oak Ridge powerhouse (with smoke stacks).
Workers load uranium slugs into the X-10 Graphite Reactor.
Aerial view of Hanford B-Reactor site, June 1944
Map of the Hanford Site. Railroads flank the plants to the north and south. Reactors are the three northernmost red squares, along the Columbia River. The separation plants are the lower two red squares from the grouping south of the reactors. The bottom red square is the 300 area.
A row of Thin Man casings. Fat Man casings are visible in the background.
An implosion-type nuclear bomb
Remote handling of a kilocurie source of radiolanthanum for a RaLa Experiment at Los Alamos
The explosives of "the gadget" were raised to the top of the tower for the final assembly.
The Trinity test of the Manhattan Project was the first detonation of a nuclear weapon.
Major General Leslie R. Groves, Jr., speaks to service personnel Oak Ridge Tennessee in August 1945.
A billboard encouraging secrecy among Oak Ridge workers
Security poster, warning office workers to close drawers and put documents in safes when not being used
Allied soldiers dismantle the German experimental nuclear reactor at Haigerloch.
Silverplate B-29 Straight Flush. The tail code of the 444th Bombardment Group is painted on for security reasons.
Little Boy explodes over Hiroshima, Japan, 6 August 1945 (left);
Fat Man explodes over Nagasaki, Japan, 9 August 1945 (right).
Presentation of the Army–Navy "E" Award at Los Alamos on 16 October 1945. Standing, left to right: J. Robert Oppenheimer, unidentified, unidentified, Kenneth Nichols, Leslie Groves, Robert Gordon Sproul, William Sterling Parsons.
President Harry S. Truman signs the Atomic Energy Act of 1946, establishing the United States Atomic Energy Commission.
The Lake Ontario Ordnance Works (LOOW) near Niagara Falls became a principal repository for Manhattan Project waste for the Eastern United States. All of the radioactive materials stored at the LOOW site—including thorium, uranium, and the world's largest concentration of radium-226—were buried in an "Interim Waste Containment Structure" (in the foreground) in 1991.
A "bomb" (pressure vessel) containing uranium halide and sacrificial metal, probably magnesium, being lowered into a furnace
After the reaction, the interior of a bomb coated with remnant slag
A uranium metal "biscuit" from the reduction reaction

In parallel with the work on uranium was an effort to produce plutonium, which was discovered by researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, in 1940.

SSL logo

Space Sciences Laboratory

SSL logo
The view of the San Francisco Bay as seen from the nearby Lawrence Hall of Science in Berkeley, California.

The Space Sciences Laboratory (SSL) is an Organized Research Unit (ORU) of the University of California, Berkeley.

Pac-12 Conference

Collegiate athletic conference, that operates in the Western United States, participating in 24 sports at the NCAA Division I level.

Collegiate athletic conference, that operates in the Western United States, participating in 24 sports at the NCAA Division I level.

Locations of current Pac-12 Conference full member institutions.
Final Pac-10 Conference logo
NCAA National Championship trophies, rings, watches won by UCLA teams
UCLA–USC rivalry football game at the Rose Bowl; the 2008 edition marked a return to the tradition of both teams wearing color jerseys.
Big Game, 2004 between California and Stanford

University of California, Berkeley

Map of the 17 DOE National Laboratories in 2014.

United States Department of Energy national laboratories

Overview of facilities.

Overview of facilities.

Map of the 17 DOE National Laboratories in 2014.
The official seal of the U.S. Department of Energy.

During the Second World War, centralized sites such as the Radiation Laboratory at MIT and Ernest O. Lawrence's laboratory at Berkeley and the Metallurgical Laboratory at the University of Chicago allowed for a large number of expert scientists to collaborate towards defined goals as never before, and with virtually unlimited government resources at their disposal.

Fulbright Program

One of several United States Cultural Exchange Programs with the goal to improve intercultural relations, cultural diplomacy, and intercultural competence between the people of the United States and other countries through the exchange of persons, knowledge, and skills.

One of several United States Cultural Exchange Programs with the goal to improve intercultural relations, cultural diplomacy, and intercultural competence between the people of the United States and other countries through the exchange of persons, knowledge, and skills.

The Fulbright U.S. Student Program offers fellowships for U.S. graduating college seniors, graduate students, young professionals, and artists to research, study, or teach English abroad for one academic year. The program facilitates cultural exchange through direct interaction on an individual basis in the classroom, field, home, and in routine tasks, allowing the grantee to gain an appreciation of others' viewpoints and beliefs, the way they do things, and the way they think. The application period opens in the spring of each year. Since the inaugural class in 1949, Harvard, Yale, Berkeley, Columbia, and Michigan have been the top producers of U.S. Student Program scholars. Michigan has been the leading producer since 2005.

Obverse of the medal

National Medal of Science

Honor bestowed by the President of the United States to individuals in science and engineering who have made important contributions to the advancement of knowledge in the fields of behavioral and social sciences, biology, chemistry, engineering, mathematics and physics.

Honor bestowed by the President of the United States to individuals in science and engineering who have made important contributions to the advancement of knowledge in the fields of behavioral and social sciences, biology, chemistry, engineering, mathematics and physics.

Obverse of the medal
Theodore von Kármán

By institutional affiliation at the time of the award, Stanford University counts the most medals at 39, with Harvard University close behind at 35, followed by the University of California, Berkeley at 30, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology at 28, and the California Institute of Technology at 25.

University of California, Los Angeles

Public land-grant research university in Los Angeles, California.

Public land-grant research university in Los Angeles, California.

The Los Angeles branch of the California State Normal School, 1881.
Reginaldo Francisco del Valle was instrumental in the creation of the Los Angeles California State Normal School, predecessor to UCLA.
Southern Branch of the University of California's Vermont Campus, 1922.
Postcard circa 1930 to 1945 of the new Westwood campus.
Royce Hall, one of the original four buildings, inspired by Basilica of Sant'Ambrogio
The Bruin statue, designed by Billy Fitzgerald, in Bruin Plaza.
Vaulted arches of Royce Hall
The front lawn of UCLA's Kerckhoff Hall, as seen during the orientation scene in Legally Blonde.
California NanoSystems Institute interior walkways above a parking structure.
Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center, near the main entrance to the campus
South entrance to the School of Law.
Fielding School of Public Health
Anderson School of Management
Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science (now UCLA Samueli School Of Engineering)
Powell Library, across the quad from Royce Hall
Hugh and Hazel Darling Law Library, UCLA School of Law
A hoodie from the UCLA Store
Official logo of UCLA Athletics
The Solid Gold Sound of the UCLA Bruin Marching Band
Basketball at Pauley Pavilion
A UCLA-USC rivalry game.
Spring Sing 2009
Kerckhoff Hall houses the student government and the Daily Bruin.
The Daily Bruin began publication in 1919, the same year that UCLA was founded.
Sproul Landing dorms above B-plate dining hall at Charles E Young and De Neve Drive.
Jackie Robinson, first African-American player in the MLB
James Franco, Academy Award-nominated actor
Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, NBA all-time scoring leader
Sean Astin, actor
Arthur Ashe, former world #1 tennis player, who won three Grand Slam titles
Sara Bareilles, Grammy Award-winning singer-songwriter
Randy Newman, singer-songwriter
Leonard Nimoy, actor, who played Spock in Star Trek
Ben Shapiro, conservative political commentator
Jack Black, actor and comedian
Mayim Bialik, actress and host of Jeopardy!
Tom Bradley, first African-American Mayor of Los Angeles
Carol Burnett, actress
Steve Martin, actor and comedian
Rob Reiner, actor and filmmaker
Ben Stiller, actor and comedian
Johnnie Cochran, lawyer and civil rights activist
Francis Ford Coppola, Academy Award-winning filmmaker
Paul Schrader, screenwriter and film director
Troy Aikman, Pro Football Hall of Fame member
Mark Harmon, actor and producer
George Takei, actor and activist
Kirsten Gillibrand, U.S. Senator from New York
James Dean, actor
H.R. Haldeman, former White House Chief of Staff
Bill Walton, Basketball Hall of Fame member
Jimmy Conners, former world #1 tennis player, who won eight Grand Slam titles
Michael Morhaime, co-founder of Blizzard Entertainment
Jim Morrison, lead singer of The Doors
Tim Robbins, Academy Award-winning actor
alt=|Russell Westbrook, NBA all-time leader in triple-doubles

This school was absorbed with the official founding of UCLA as the Southern Branch of the University of California in 1919, making it the second-oldest of the 10-campus University of California system (after UC Berkeley).