University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Statue of Confederate soldier Silent Sam. The statue was toppled by a crowd in 2018, and the plinth (pedestal) was ordered removed by Chancellor Carol Folt in the same letter in which she resigned. As of October 2020 it is in storage.
Panoramic image of the main quad
Franklin Street forms the northern border of main campus and contains many popular restaurants and shops. In addition, it serves as a focal point for cultural events including Halloween festivities and major basketball victory rallies.
The Morehead Planetarium, designed by Eggers & Higgins, first opened in 1949.
A representation of the university seal, located in front of South Building and dedicated by the class of 1989.
Students walk past the Old Well, a symbol of UNC-Chapel Hill for years
The Morehead–Patterson Bell Tower was completed in 1931 and stands 172 feet tall.
South Building, administrative offices of the chancellor and College of Arts and Sciences
Students walking through campus between classes
The Davis Library
Louis Round Wilson Library opened in 1929 and serves as the special collections library.
The NCC is the largest collection of printed materials related to a single state.
Graham Memorial is adjacent to Franklin Street and houses the Office for Undergraduate Research and the Honors Study Abroad program.
Water tower featuring the official UNC athletics logo
Rameses at the 1957 Victory Bell football game
Celebration on Franklin Street after victory over Duke
The 2007 commencement ceremony in Kenan Memorial Stadium
The Dialectic and Philanthropic Societies of UNC were founded in 1795 and have debates each week in the New West building.
The Forest Theatre was first used for outdoor drama in 1916 to celebrate the tercentenary of Shakespeare's death.
Undergraduates on campus at UNC-Chapel Hill
At the end of each semester, students organize a flash mob dance party in the library.
Lenoir Hall
Old East Residence Hall, built in 1793
James K. Polk was President of the United States from 1845 to 1849.
Thomas Wolfe remains one of the most important writers in modern American literature, authoring works such as Look Homeward, Angel and Of Time and the River.
Andy Griffith was an active member of Chapel Hill's arts community while attending UNC, later starring in productions such as A Face in the Crowd and The Andy Griffith Show.
Michael Jordan (left) played basketball under Dean Smith (right) while attending the University of North Carolina. Jordan helped the Tar Heels win the 1982 NCAA Championship with a game-winning jump shot.

Public research university in Chapel Hill, North Carolina.

- University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

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University of North Carolina at Greensboro

Public research university in Greensboro, North Carolina.

North Carolina State Normal and Industrial School, ca. 1906.
Julius I. Foust Building, built in 1891.
The Fountain in front of the Dining Halls.
The Bryan building, home of the business school, was completed in 1979.
The School of Education at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro.
UNCG College of Visual and Performing Arts
Cornelia Strong College Arms
Paul Chelimo
Emmylou Harris
Danny Valencia
The Blue Crew at a soccer game.
The Blue Crew at a basketball game.
Blue Crew at a basketball game.
Blue Crew

The campus is in close proximity (within 1.5 hours drive) to many other universities — North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University, Duke, Elon, High Point University, NC State, UNC-Chapel Hill, UNC Charlotte, Wake Forest, and Winston-Salem State University.

Kemp P. Battle

American lawyer, railroad president, university president, educator, and historian.

Battle pictured in Yackety Yak 1919, UNC yearbook

He served as North Carolina State Treasurer and as president of the University of North Carolina in the nineteenth century.

Chapel Hill, North Carolina

Town in Orange, Durham and Chatham counties in the U.S. state of North Carolina.

A mural at Amber Alley between Franklin and Rosemary streets
Chapel Hill fire truck, painted with the colors of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
The Sorrell building on Franklin Street has housed a movie theater (currently called the Varsity Theatre) since its construction in 1927.
UNC's wooded campus buffers the town center

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and UNC Health Care are a major part of the economy and town influence.

The Daily Tar Heel

Front page of the first issue of The Tar Heel, later renamed to The Daily Tar Heel
The 2010-2017 DTH office.

The Daily Tar Heel (DTH) is the independent student newspaper of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

UNC Hussman School of Journalism and Media

Carroll Hall on UNC's campus
Carroll Hall on UNC's campus

The UNC Hussman School of Journalism and Media (locally regarded as "the J school") is a nationally accredited professional undergraduate and graduate level journalism school at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center

NC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center

The UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center is a cancer research and treatment center at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Public Ivy

Term that refers to prestigious public colleges and universities in the United States that provide a collegiate experience similar to those in the Ivy League.

alt=Sather Tower seen from Memorial Glade of the University of California, Berkeley|Sather Tower seen from Memorial Glade of the University of California, Berkeley
alt=The Main Building at the University of Texas at Austin|The Main Building at the University of Texas at Austin
alt=Suzzallo Library at the University of Washington|Suzzallo Library at the University of Washington
alt=Michigan Union at the University of Michigan|Michigan Union at the University of Michigan
alt=The Rotunda at the University of Virginia|The Rotunda at the University of Virginia
alt=Wilson Library at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill|Wilson Library at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Wren Building at the College of William & Mary
MacCracken Hall at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio
Billings Memorial Library at the University of Vermont
Sewall Hall at the University of Colorado Boulder
Savant Building at the Georgia Institute of Technology
Foellinger Auditorium on the Main Quad of the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign
College Hall and Cook Hall at the New College of Florida
Cathedral of Learning at the University of Pittsburgh
Bascom Hall atop Bascom Hill at the University of Wisconsin-Madison
Powell Library at the University of California, Los Angeles
Academic Complex at the State University of New York at Binghamton
Old Main at the Pennsylvania State University
Demarest Hall at Rutgers University in New Brunswick, New Jersey
Jacobson Barn at the University of Connecticut
Peabody Hall at the University of Florida
Brooks Hall at the University of Georgia
University Hall at the Ohio State University
Beaumont Tower at the Michigan State University
Sample Gates entrance to Old Crescent at Indiana University Bloomington
Old Capitol Museum in the Pentacrest at the University of Iowa
Morrill Hall on the Northrop Mall at the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities
Geisel Library at the University of California, San Diego
Jack Langson Library at the University of California, Irvine
University Center and Storke Tower at the University of California, Santa Barbara
Putah Creek at the University of California, Davis
Maricopa Hall at the University of Arizona
The Mall at the University of Delaware
Reckord Armory at the University of Maryland, College Park
Quarry Amphitheatre at the University of California, Santa Cruz
Gary Anderson Hall at the University of California, Riverside

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

University of North Carolina School of Law

Van Hecke-Wettach Hall
The 1999 addition to Van Hecke-Wettach Hall commonly referred to as the "Rotunda"

The University of North Carolina School of Law is a professional school within the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

James K. Polk

The 11th president of the United States, serving from 1845 to 1849.

Portrait by Mathew Brady, c. undefined 1849
Reconstruction of the log cabin in Pineville, North Carolina where Polk was born
c. 1846–49 daguerreotype of James K. Polk and Sarah Childress Polk
The house where Polk spent his young adult life before his presidency, in Columbia, Tennessee, is his only private residence still standing. It is now known as the James K. Polk Home.
1844 campaign banner for the Polk/Dallas ticket, produced by Nathaniel Currier
Results of the 1844 presidential election
The White House 1846
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President Polk, BEP engraved portrait
The inauguration of James K. Polk, as shown in the Illustrated London News, v. 6, April 19, 1845
Polk and his cabinet in the White House dining room, 1846. Front row, left to right: John Y. Mason, William L. Marcy, James K. Polk, Robert J. Walker. Back row, left to right: Cave Johnson, George Bancroft. Secretary of State James Buchanan is absent. This was the first photograph taken in the White House, and the first of a presidential Cabinet.
Map of Oregon Country, which the Oregon Treaty split between the Americans and British at the 49th parallel
Map of Mexico in 1845, with the Republic of Texas, the Republic of Yucatan and the disputed territory between Mexico and Texas in red. Mexico claimed to own all of Texas.
Polk's presidential proclamation of war against Mexico
Overview map of the war
War News from Mexico (1848)
Antonio López de Santa Anna, 1847
The Mexican Cession (in red) was acquired through the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo. The Gadsden Purchase (in orange) was acquired through purchase after Polk left office.
United States states and territories when Polk entered office
United States states and territories when Polk left office
Polk's official White House portrait, by George Peter Alexander Healy, 1858
The California Gold Rush began under Polk.
Associate Justice Levi Woodbury (c. 1850)
Robert C. Grier, one of President Polk's two appointees to the Supreme Court
Results of the 1848 presidential election
James K. Polk's tomb lies on the grounds of the Tennessee State Capitol
Polk Place, briefly James Polk's home and long that of his widow
Elias Polk depicted later in life was a valet to James Polk, being the only known image of a Polk household slave.
A statue of Polk at the North Carolina State Capitol

In January 1816, Polk was admitted into the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill as a second-semester sophomore.

Title IX

Most commonly used name for the federal civil rights law in the United States of America that was passed as part of the Education Amendments of 1972.

Senator Birch Bayh of Indiana
Senator Bayh exercises with Title IX athletes at Purdue University in the 1970s.
Representative Patsy Mink of Hawaii, Title IX co-author, for whom the law was renamed in 2002

When the Amherst case reached national attention, Annie E. Clark and Andrea Pino, two women who were allegedly sexually assaulted at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill connected with Epifano, Brodsky, and Yale Law School student Dana Bolger to address the parallel concerns of hostility at their institution, filing Title IX and Clery Act complaints against the university in January 2013, both leading to investigations by the U.S. Department of Education.