University of Padua

PaduaUniversity of PadovaPadua UniversityUniversityUniversità degli Studi di PadovaUniversità di PadovaPadovathe collegeUniversities of Padualocal university
The University of Padua (Università degli Studi di Padova, UNIPD) is an Italian university located in the city of Padua, Veneto, Italy.wikipedia
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Padua

PadovaPadua, ItalyPatavium
The University of Padua (Università degli Studi di Padova, UNIPD) is an Italian university located in the city of Padua, Veneto, Italy.
It hosts the University of Padua, founded in 1222, where later Galileo Galilei was a lecturer between 1592 and 1610.

List of oldest universities in continuous operation

oldest universitiesoldest universities in continuous operationeducational
Padua is the second-oldest university in Italy and the world's fifth-oldest surviving university.

Veneto

VenetiaVenetianVeneto region
The University of Padua (Università degli Studi di Padova, UNIPD) is an Italian university located in the city of Padua, Veneto, Italy.
This period also witnessed the founding of the second oldest university in Italy, the University of Padua founded in 1222.

Orto botanico di Padova

Botanical GardenBotanical Garden (Orto Botanico), PaduaBotanical Gardens
The Botanical Garden of Padova, established by the university in 1545, was one of the oldest gardens of its kind in the world (after the Hanging Gardens of Babylon).
The garden, affiliated with the University of Padua, currently covers roughly 22,000 square meters, and is known for its special collections and historical design.

De humani corporis fabrica

De humani corporis fabrica libri septemAndreas Vesalius's ''FabricaDe Fabrica
Anatomist Andreas Vesalius held the chair of Surgery and Anatomy (explicator chirurgiae) and in 1543 published his anatomical discoveries in De Humani Corporis Fabrica.
The collection of books is based on his Paduan lectures, during which he deviated from common practice by dissecting a corpse to illustrate what he was discussing.

Gio Ponti

Giò Ponti
The last years of the nineteenth and the first half of the twentieth century saw a reversal of the centralisation process that had taken place in the sixteenth: scientific institutes were set up in what became veritable campuses; a new building to house the Arts and Philosophy faculty was built in another part of the city centre (Palazzo del Liviano, designed by Giò Ponti); the Astro-Physics Observatory was built on the Asiago uplands; and the old Palazzo del Bo was fully restored (1938–45).
From 1934 to 1942, he worked at the University of Padua, with the construction and interior design of the new Faculty of Arts, Il Liviano (1934–1940), then the artistic direction and interior design of the Aula Magna, the basilica and the rectorate of the Palazzo Bo.

Asiago Astrophysical Observatory

Cima EkarAsiago ObservatoryAsiago Obs.
The last years of the nineteenth and the first half of the twentieth century saw a reversal of the centralisation process that had taken place in the sixteenth: scientific institutes were set up in what became veritable campuses; a new building to house the Arts and Philosophy faculty was built in another part of the city centre (Palazzo del Liviano, designed by Giò Ponti); the Astro-Physics Observatory was built on the Asiago uplands; and the old Palazzo del Bo was fully restored (1938–45).
The Asiago Astrophysical Observatory (Osservatorio Astrofisico di Asiago, or Asiago Observatory for short) is an Italian astronomical observatory (IAU code 043) owned and operated by the University of Padua.

Andreas Vesalius

VesaliusAndrea VesaliusVesalius, Andreas
Anatomist Andreas Vesalius held the chair of Surgery and Anatomy (explicator chirurgiae) and in 1543 published his anatomical discoveries in De Humani Corporis Fabrica.
He was professor at the University of Padua and later became Imperial physician at the court of Emperor Charles V.

Nation (university)

student nationnationsnation
The student body was divided into groups known as "nations" which reflected their places of origin.
Students in the University of Padua were divided in 22 nations, which referred to the different territories ruled by the Republic of Venice, to the biggest states of Italy, and to the main states of Europe.

Nathaniel Eaton

He then pursued his studies, obtaining a M.D. and a P.h.D. from the University of Padua.

Thomas Browne

Sir Thomas BrowneBrowne, ThomasBrowne
He graduated from Oxford in January 1627, after which he studied medicine at Padua and Montpellier universities, completing his studies at Leiden, where he received a medical degree in 1633.

William Harvey

HarveyDe GenerationeHarvey, William
He then travelled through France and Germany to Italy, where he entered the University of Padua, in 1599.

John Caius

CaiusJohannes CaiusDr. Caius
In 1541 he took his degree as a physician at the University of Padua.

George Ent

Sir George Ent
Following his graduation from Sidney, he spent five years at the University of Padua, earning his MD in 1636.

Francis Walsingham

Sir Francis WalsinghamWalsinghamSir '''Francis Walsingham
He continued his studies in law at the universities of Basel and Padua, where he was elected to the governing body by his fellow students in 1555.

Asiago

Asiago plateauAltopiano di AsiagoAltopiano of Asiago
The last years of the nineteenth and the first half of the twentieth century saw a reversal of the centralisation process that had taken place in the sixteenth: scientific institutes were set up in what became veritable campuses; a new building to house the Arts and Philosophy faculty was built in another part of the city centre (Palazzo del Liviano, designed by Giò Ponti); the Astro-Physics Observatory was built on the Asiago uplands; and the old Palazzo del Bo was fully restored (1938–45).
It is a major ski resort destination as well as the site of the Astrophysical Observatory of Asiago, operated by the University of Padua.

Gabriele Falloppio

FallopiusFalloppioFallopio
In 1551 Falloppio was invited to occupy the chair of anatomy and surgery at the University of Padua.

Alexandros Mavrokordatos

Prince Alexander MavrocordatosAlexandros MavrocordatosAlexander Mavrokordatos
In 1812, Mavrokordatos went to the court of his uncle John George Caradja, Hospodar of Wallachia, with whom he passed into exile in the Austrian Empire (1818), where he studied at the University of Padua.

Luigi Luzzatti

Luzzatti
After completing his studies in law at the University of Padua, he attracted the attention of the Austrian police by his lectures on political economy, and was obliged to emigrate after starting a mutual aid society among gondoliers.

Ioannis Kapodistrias

John CapodistriaKapodistriasIoannis Capodistrias
Kapodistrias studied medicine, philosophy and law at the University of Padua in 1795–97.

Nicolaus Copernicus

CopernicusCopernicanNicholas Copernicus
This time he studied at the University of Padua, famous as a seat of medical learning, and—except for a brief visit to Ferrara in May–June 1503 to pass examinations for, and receive, his doctorate in canon law—he remained at Padua from fall 1501 to summer 1503.

Jan Zamoyski

Krystyna RadziwiłłJan Zamojski
In 1559 he briefly visited Poland, then attended the University of Strasbourg; after a few months there he moved to University of Padua, where from 1561 he studied law and received a doctorate in 1564.

Sir Edward Greaves, 1st Baronet

Edward GreavesSir Edward GreavesGreaves of St Leonard's Forest
After this he studied medicine at Padua University, where in 1636 he wrote some complimentary Latin verses to Sir George Ent on his graduation, and returning to Oxford graduated M.B. 18 July 1640, M.D. 8 July 1641.

Federico Faggin

Faggin, Federico
Born in Vicenza, Faggin received a laurea degree in physics, summa cum laude, at the University of Padua, Italy.

Reginald Pole

Cardinal PoleCardinal Reginald PoleReginald Cardinal Pole
In 1521, Pole went to the University of Padua, where he met leading Renaissance figures, including Pietro Bembo, Gianmatteo Giberti (formerly pope Leo X's datary and chief minister), Jacopo Sadoleto, Gianpietro Carafa (the future Pope Paul IV), Rodolfo Pio, Otto Truchsess, Stanislaus Hosius, Cristoforo Madruzzo, Giovanni Morone, Pier Paolo Vergerio the younger, Peter Martyr Vermigli and Vettor Soranzo.