A report on University of Paris

The Sorbonne covered by snow.
Meeting of doctors at the University of Paris. From a 16th-century miniature.
Map showing the territories covered by the four nations of the University of Paris during the Middle Ages.
Rue Saint-Jacques and the Sorbonne in Paris
The Old Sorbonne on fire in 1670.
The Sorbonne, Paris, in a 17th-century engraving
The Sorbonne as seen from rue des Écoles.
Victor Cousin
John Calvin
Thomas Aquinas
Denis Diderot
Antoine-Henri Becquerel
Marie Skłodowska Curie
Henri Bergson
Jean-Paul Sartre
Jean Tirole
Gabriel Lippmann
Jean Perrin
Alfred Kastler
Jules Bordet
T. S. Eliot
Antoine-Henri Becquerel

The leading university in Paris, France, active from 1150 to 1970, with the exception of 1793–1806 under the French Revolution.

- University of Paris

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Gold coins minted by the Parisii (1st century BC)

Paris

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Capital and most populous city of France, with an estimated population of 2,165,423 residents in 2019 in an area of more than 105 km² , making it the 34th most densely populated city in the world in 2020.

Capital and most populous city of France, with an estimated population of 2,165,423 residents in 2019 in an area of more than 105 km² , making it the 34th most densely populated city in the world in 2020.

Gold coins minted by the Parisii (1st century BC)
The Palais de la Cité and Sainte-Chapelle, viewed from the Left Bank, from the Très Riches Heures du duc de Berry (month of June) (1410)
The Hôtel de Sens, one of many remnants of the Middle Ages in Paris
The storming of the Bastille on 14 July 1789, by Jean-Pierre Houël
The Panthéon, a major landmark on the Rive Gauche, was completed in 1790.
The Eiffel Tower, under construction in November 1888, startled Parisians — and the world — with its modernity.
General Charles de Gaulle on the Champs-Élysées celebrating the liberation of Paris, 26 August 1944
Western Paris in 2016, as photographed by a SkySat satellite
Anti-terrorism demonstration on the Place de la République after the Charlie Hebdo shooting, 11 January 2015
Satellite image of Paris by Sentinel-2
Autumn in Paris
A map of the arrondissements of Paris
The Hôtel de Ville, or city hall, has been at the same site since 1357.
A map of the Greater Paris Metropolis (Métropole du Grand Paris) and its governing territories
The Élysée Palace, official residence of the President of the French Republic
The Palais-Royal, residence of the Conseil d'État
Police (Gendarmerie) motorcyclists in Paris
Camille Pissarro, Boulevard Montmartre, 1897, Hermitage Museum
Rue de Rivoli
Place des Vosges
Paris and its suburbs, as seen from the Spot Satellite
West of Paris seen from Tour Montparnasse in 2019
City proper, urban area, and metropolitan area population from 1800 to 2010
Sacré-Cœur in Montmartre
St-Gervais-et-St-Protais in Le Marais
The Eiffel Tower and the La Défense district
Employment by economic sector in the Paris area (petite couronne), with population and unemployment figures (2015)
Median income in Paris and its nearest departments in 2018 (high income in red, low income in yellow)
Tourists from around the world make the Louvre the most-visited art museum in the world.
The Passage Jouffroy, one of Paris's covered passages
The Axe historique, pictured here from Concorde to Grande Arche of La Défense
Pierre Mignard, Self-portrait, between 1670 and 1690, oil on canvas, 235 x, The Louvre
Auguste Renoir, Bal du moulin de la Galette, 1876, oil on canvas, 131 x, Musée d'Orsay
Musée d'Orsay
Musée du quai Branly
The Comédie Française (Salle Richelieu)
Victor Hugo
Jean-Paul Sartre
Olympia, a famous music hall
Charles Aznavour
Salah Zulfikar and Sabah in Paris and Love (1972)
Dining room of the Vagenende
Le Zimmer, on the Place du Châtelet, where Géo Lefèvre first suggested the idea of a Tour de France to Henri Desgrange in 1902
Les Deux Magots café on Boulevard Saint-Germain
Magdalena Frackowiak at Paris Fashion Week (Fall 2011)
Republican Guards parading on Bastille Day
The main building of the former University of Paris is now used by classes from Sorbonne University, New Sorbonne University and other autonomous campuses.
The École des hautes études en sciences sociales (EHESS), France's most prestigious university in the social sciences, is headquartered in the 6th arrondissement.
Sainte-Geneviève Library
Parc des Princes
2010 Tour de France, Champs Élysées
The French Open, played on red clay, is one of four Grand Slams in professional tennis.
The Gare du Nord railway station is the busiest in Europe.
The Paris Métro is the busiest subway network in the European Union.
In 2020 Paris–Charles de Gaulle Airport was the busiest airport in Europe and the eighth-busiest airport in the world.
Ring roads of Paris
Vélib' at the Place de la Bastille
A view of the Seine, the Île de la Cité and a Bateau Mouche
The lawns of the Parc des Buttes-Chaumont on a sunny day
The Passerelle de l'Avre, crossing the Seine and establishing a link between the Bois de Boulogne and Saint-Cloud in Hauts-de-Seine, is the City of Paris's westernmost point.
The Paris Catacombs hold the remains of approximately 6 million people.
The Hôtel-Dieu de Paris, the oldest hospital in the city
Agence France-Presse Headquarters in Paris
Column dedicated to Paris near the Baths of Diocletian in Rome
Sculpture dedicated to Rome in the square Paul Painlevé in Paris
Lutetia Parisiorum vulgo Paris, Plan de Paris en 1657, Jan Janssonius

In 1190, he transformed Paris's former cathedral school into a student-teacher corporation that would become the University of Paris and would draw students from all of Europe.

Curie c. 1920

Marie Curie

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Polish and naturalized-French physicist and chemist who conducted pioneering research on radioactivity.

Polish and naturalized-French physicist and chemist who conducted pioneering research on radioactivity.

Curie c. 1920
Birthplace, ulica Freta 16, Warsaw.
Władysław Skłodowski, daughters (from left) Maria, Bronisława, Helena, 1890
Maria (left), sister Bronisława,
Krakowskie Przedmiescie 66, Warsaw, where Maria did her first scientific work, 1890–91.
Pierre and Marie Curie in the laboratory, c. undefined 1904
Pierre, Irène, & Marie Curie, c. undefined 1902
Pierre and Marie Curie, c. undefined1903
1903 Nobel Prize portrait
1903 Nobel Prize diploma
Caricature of Marie and Pierre Curie, captioned "Radium", in the London magazine Vanity Fair, December 1904
At the first Solvay Conference (1911), Curie (seated, second from right) confers with Henri Poincaré; standing nearby are Rutherford (fourth from right), Einstein (second from right), and Paul Langevin (far right).
1911 Nobel Prize diploma
Curie in a mobile X-ray vehicle, c. 1915
Marie and daughter Irène, 1925
1935 statue, facing the Radium Institute, Warsaw
Marie Curie Monument in Lublin
Tomb of Pierre and Marie Curie, Panthéon, Paris, 2011
Bust of "Maria Skłodowska-Curie", CERN Museum, Switzerland, 2015

She was, in 1906, the first woman to become a professor at the University of Paris.

The Sorbonne Chapel

Sorbonne

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The Sorbonne Chapel
The building's primary entrance on the
A side entrance with a sign reading "Sorbonne"
The West facade of the chapel with dome visible

The Sorbonne is a building in the Latin Quarter of Paris which from 1253 onwards housed the College of Sorbonne, part of one of the first universities in the Western world, later renamed University of Paris and commonly known as "the Sorbonne".

Sorbonne University

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Public research university located in Paris, France.

Public research university located in Paris, France.

Chapel of the main Sorbonne building
Inter-university Library of La Sorbonne
Sorbonne University's graduation ceremony, May 2011
The Sorbonne
Perspective view from the Jardin des Plantes
The "Amphithéâtre Richelieu", a lecture hall of Paris-Sorbonne University

The college of Sorbonne was closed along with all the other colleges of the former University of Paris in 1793.

Collège de Montaigu, ca. 1850

Collège de Montaigu

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Collège de Montaigu, ca. 1850
Collège de Montaigu: foundation and statutes. Latin manuscript, 17th century (Bibliothèque de la Sorbonne, NuBIS)

The Collège de Montaigu was one of the constituent colleges of the Faculty of Arts of the University of Paris.

The College of Sorbonne in 1550

College of Sorbonne

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The College of Sorbonne in 1550
The chapel of the Sorbonne, Paris, in a 17th-century engraving
The chapel of the Sorbonne today, from the same point of view
Facade of the new Sorbonne building (1889).

The College of Sorbonne (Collège de Sorbonne) was a theological college of the University of Paris, founded in 1253 (confirmed in 1257) by Robert de Sorbon (1201–1274), after whom it was named.

Page from Apologia contra Bernardum, Abelard's reply to Bernard of Clairvaux

Peter Abelard

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Medieval French scholastic philosopher, leading logician, theologian, poet, composer and musician.

Medieval French scholastic philosopher, leading logician, theologian, poet, composer and musician.

Page from Apologia contra Bernardum, Abelard's reply to Bernard of Clairvaux
Abelard Teaching by François Flameng, mural at the Sorbonne
"Abaelardus and Heloïse surprised by Master Fulbert", by Romanticist painter Jean Vignaud (1819)
Abelard, attacked and castrated
Statue of Abelard at Louvre Palace in Paris by Jules Cavelier
Abelard receives the monastery of the Paraclete Héloïse (1129)
Dedicatory panel in the Père Lachaise Cemetery
Abelard and Héloïse in a manuscript of the Roman de la Rose (14th century)
Jean-Baptiste Goyet, Héloïse et Abailard, oil on copper, c. 1829.
Heloise and Abelard, Achille Devaria, 19th c. engraving
Abelard, Heloise, and medieval astrolabe portrayed in Michael Shenefelt's stage play, Heloise

This eventually gave to School of Notre-Dame de Paris (later the University of Paris) a recognition for its expertise in the area of Law (and later led to the creation of a faculty of law in Paris).

The University of Bologna in Italy, founded in 1088, is often regarded as the world's oldest university in continuous operation

University

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Institution of higher education and research which awards academic degrees in several academic disciplines.

Institution of higher education and research which awards academic degrees in several academic disciplines.

The University of Bologna in Italy, founded in 1088, is often regarded as the world's oldest university in continuous operation
Harvard University, founded in 1636, is the oldest university in the United States and is routinely ranked among the world's best universities
Moroccan higher-learning institution Al-Qarawiyin (founded in 859 A.D.) was transformed into a university under the supervision of the ministry of education in 1963.
Meeting of doctors at the University of Paris. From a medieval manuscript.
The University of Oxford is the oldest university in the United Kingdom and among the world's top ranked
The University of St Andrews, founded in 1410, is Scotland's oldest university and one of the UK's best ranked universities.
Old main building of the University of Basel—Switzerland's oldest university (1460). The university is among the birthplaces of Renaissance humanism
17th-century classroom at the University of Salamanca
King's College London, established by Royal Charter having been founded by King George IV and Duke of Wellington in 1829, is one of the founding colleges of the University of London.
Peking University in Beijing was founded as the Imperial University of Peking
The University of Sydney is Australia's oldest university.
The University of Virginia in Charlottesville, Virginia in the United States was founded in 1819 by American founding father Thomas Jefferson

The first universities in Europe with a form of corporate/guild structure were the University of Bologna (1088), the University of Paris (c.1150, later associated with the Sorbonne), and the University of Oxford (1167).

La Sorbonne

Latin Quarter, Paris

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Area in the 5th and the 6th arrondissements of Paris.

Area in the 5th and the 6th arrondissements of Paris.

La Sorbonne
View of Rue de la Huchette (October 2003)
École Normale Supérieure, one major college of the Latin Quarter

It is situated on the left bank of the Seine, around the Sorbonne.

The structure designed by Jacques-Germain Soufflot for the Paris Law Faculty, on place du Panthéon

Faculty of Law of Paris

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The structure designed by Jacques-Germain Soufflot for the Paris Law Faculty, on place du Panthéon
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Pierre Abelard, theologian and logician before the existence of the faculty of law, who gave to the Sorbonne a recognition for its expertise in law in the early 20th century
Saint Ivo, alumnus, declared saint by the Church in 1347, patron of the lawyers, "Advocate of the Poors". His day is still celebrated by the lawyers, at least in France. In this painting, he is bringing justice between a rich and a poor
Jacques-Germain Soufflot, alumnus and architect of the Panthéon building of the Faculty of Law of Paris, opened in 1774
Large amphitheatre of the Faculty of Law of Paris in 1847
Course at the Faculty of Law of Paris in the early 20th century
Andrea Alciato, founder of legal humanism
René Cassin, co-author of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, Nobel Peace Prize, soldier during WW2

The Faculty of Law of Paris (Faculté de droit de Paris), called from the late 1950s to 1970 the Faculty of Law and Economics of Paris, is the second-oldest faculty of law in the world and one of the four and eventually five faculties of the University of Paris ("the Sorbonne"), from the 12th century until 1970.