University of Paris

SorbonneParisLa SorbonneUniversité de ParisUniversity of SorbonneParis Universitythe SorbonneSorbonne UniversityFaculté de Médecine de ParisCollège du Plessis
The University of Paris (Université de Paris), metonymically known as the Sorbonne, was a university in Paris, France, active 1150–1793, and 1806–1970.wikipedia
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Doctor (title)

Dr.DoctorDr
Internationally highly reputed for its academic performance in the humanities ever since the Middle Ages – notably in theology and philosophy – it introduced several academic standards and traditions that have endured ever since and spread internationally, such as doctoral degrees and student nations.
It has been used as an academic title in Europe since the 13th century, when the first Doctorates were awarded at the University of Bologna and the University of Paris.

List of medieval universities

eighty medieval universitiesEuropean universitiesMedieval universities
Emerging around 1150 as a corporation associated with the cathedral school of Notre Dame de Paris, it was considered the second oldest university in Europe.

Paris Law Faculty

faculté de droit de ParisSorbonne Law SchoolFaculty of Law
A new University of France replaced it in 1806 with four independent faculties: the Faculty of Humanities (Faculté des Lettres), the Faculty of Law (later including Economics), the Faculty of Science, the Faculty of Medicine and the Faculty of Theology (closed in 1885).
The Paris Law Faculty (Faculté de droit de Paris) was one of the four and eventually five faculties of the University of Paris, nicknamed "the Sorbonne", from around 1150–1200 until 1970.

May 68

May 1968May 1968 in FranceMay 1968 events in France
In 1970, following the May 1968 events, the university was divided into 13 autonomous universities.
Following months of conflicts between students and authorities at the Nanterre campus of the University of Paris (now Paris Nanterre University), the administration shut down the university on 2 May 1968.

Nation (university)

student nationnationsnation
Internationally highly reputed for its academic performance in the humanities ever since the Middle Ages – notably in theology and philosophy – it introduced several academic standards and traditions that have endured ever since and spread internationally, such as doctoral degrees and student nations.
In the University of Paris there were the French, Normans, Picards, and the English, and later the Alemannian nation.

University

universitiescollegecomprehensive university
The University of Paris (Université de Paris), metonymically known as the Sorbonne, was a university in Paris, France, active 1150–1793, and 1806–1970.
The first universities in Europe with a form of corporate/guild structure were the University of Bologna (1088), the University of Paris (c.1150, later associated with the Sorbonne), and the University of Oxford (1167).

Collège des Bernardins

College des Bernardins
A few of the colleges of the time are still visible close to Pantheon and Luxembourg Gardens: Collège des Bernardins (18, rue de Poissy 75005), Hotel de Cluny (6, Place Paul Painleve 75005), College Sainte Barbe (4, rue Valette 75005), College d'Harcourt (44 Boulevard Saint-Michel 75006), and Cordeliers (21, Rue Ecole de Medecine 75006).
The Collège of Bernardins, or Collège Saint-Bernard, located no 20, rue de Poissy in the 5th arrondissement of Paris, is a former Cistercian college of the historic University of Paris.

Gerard la Pucelle

Gerard de Pucelle
Before the end of the twelfth century, the Decretals of Gerard La Pucelle, Mathieu d'Angers, and Anselm (or Anselle) of Paris, were added to the Decretum Gratiani.
Gerard was possibly born in England, taught canon law at the University of Paris in the 1150s, when the study of the discipline of the Church was first differentiated from theology, spurred by the collections of church decretals that began with the Decretum Gratiani assembled by a monk at the University of Bologna.

France

FrenchFRAFrench Republic
The University of Paris (Université de Paris), metonymically known as the Sorbonne, was a university in Paris, France, active 1150–1793, and 1806–1970.
The University of Paris, founded in the mid-12th century, is still one of the most important universities in the Western world.

John of Salisbury

Jean de SalisburyJoannes SaresberiensisJohannes Saresburiensis
Noted German and English students included Otto of Freisingen, Cardinal Conrad, Archbishop of Mainz, St. Thomas of Canterbury, and John of Salisbury; while Ste-Geneviève became practically the seminary for Denmark.
His vivid accounts of teachers and students provide some of the most valuable insights into the early days of the University of Paris.

Pope Martin IV

Martin IVSimon de BrionSimon Monpitie de Brie
Simon de Brion, legate of the Holy See in France, realizing that such frequent changes caused serious inconvenience, decided that the rectorate should last three months, and this rule was observed for three years.
He spent time at the University of Paris, and is said to have then studied law at Padua and Bologna.

College of Sorbonne

SorbonneCollège de Sorbonnethe Sorbonne
Officially chartered in 1200 by King Philip II of France and recognised in 1215 by Pope Innocent III, it was later often nicknamed after its theological College of Sorbonne, in turn founded by Robert de Sorbon and chartered by French King Saint Louis around 1257. Four colleges appeared in the 12th century; they became more numerous in the 13th, including Collège d'Harcourt (1280) and the Collège de Sorbonne (1257).
The College of Sorbonne (Collège de Sorbonne) was a theological college of the University of Paris, founded in 1253 by Robert de Sorbon (1201–1274), after whom it was named.

Collegiate university

constituent collegecollegiatecollegiate universities
Navarre's model combining lodging and tuition would be reproduced by other colleges, both in Paris and other universities.
Historically, the first collegiate university was the University of Paris and its first college was the Collège des Dix-Huit.

Academic degree

degreedegreesuniversity degree
At this period, therefore, the university had two principal degrees, the baccalaureate and the doctorate.
This right remained a bone of contention between the church authorities and the slowly emancipating universities, but was granted by the Pope to the University of Paris in 1231 where it became a universal license to teach (licentia ubique docendi).

Scots College (Paris)

Scots CollegeCollège des ÉcossaisScots College in Paris
The German College, Collegium alemanicum is mentioned as early as 1345, the Scots college or Collegium scoticum was founded in 1325.
The Scots College (Collegium Scoticum; Collège des Écossais) was a college of the University of Paris, France, founded by an Act of the Parlement of Paris on 8 July 1333.

Condemnations of 1210–1277

Condemnations of 1277Condemnation of 1277condemnation
At this time, the university also went the controversy of the condemnations of 1210–1277.
The Condemnations at the medieval University of Paris were enacted to restrict certain teachings as being heretical.

Pope Gregory IX

Gregory IXthe PopeUgolino di Conti
The pope intervened with a Bull that began with lavish praise of the university: "Paris", said Gregory IX, "mother of the sciences, is another Cariath-Sepher, city of letters".
Gregory's Bull Parens scientiarum of 1231, after the University of Paris strike of 1229, resolved differences between the unruly university scholars of Paris and the local authorities.

Hundred Years' War

Hundred Years WarHundred Years’ WarHundred Year's War
The assemblies of the French barons and prelates and the University of Paris decided that males who derive their right to inheritance through their mother should be excluded.

Collège de Montaigu

Collège MontaiguMontaigu CollegeMontaigu jail
The Collège de Montaigu was founded by the Archbishop of Rouen in the 14th century, and reformed in the 15th century by the humanist Jan Standonck, when it attracted reformers from within the Roman Catholic Church (such as Erasmus and Ignatius of Loyola) and those who subsequently became Protestants (John Calvin and John Knox).
The Collège de Montaigu was one of the constituent colleges of the Faculty of Arts of the University of Paris.

Jan Standonck

The Collège de Montaigu was founded by the Archbishop of Rouen in the 14th century, and reformed in the 15th century by the humanist Jan Standonck, when it attracted reformers from within the Roman Catholic Church (such as Erasmus and Ignatius of Loyola) and those who subsequently became Protestants (John Calvin and John Knox).
Chief amongst them was the Collège de Montaigu, latterly part of the University of Paris.

Abbey of Saint Genevieve

Abbey of St GenevieveAbbey of Sainte-GenevièveSainte-Geneviève Abbey
Three schools were especially famous in Paris: the palatine or palace school, the school of Notre-Dame, and that of Sainte-Geneviève Abbey.
St-Victor, Ste-Geneviève, and Notre-Dame were the cradles of the University of Paris.

Lycée Saint-Louis

Collège d'HarcourtCollege d'HarcourtCollege of Harcourt
Four colleges appeared in the 12th century; they became more numerous in the 13th, including Collège d'Harcourt (1280) and the Collège de Sorbonne (1257).
(Latin: Collegio Harcuriano) At the time of its founding it was meant to be a residence for students of the University of Paris.

John Calvin

CalvinJean CalvinCalvinist
The Collège de Montaigu was founded by the Archbishop of Rouen in the 14th century, and reformed in the 15th century by the humanist Jan Standonck, when it attracted reformers from within the Roman Catholic Church (such as Erasmus and Ignatius of Loyola) and those who subsequently became Protestants (John Calvin and John Knox).
Through their assistance, Calvin was able to attend the Collège de la Marche, Paris, where he learned Latin from one of its greatest teachers, Mathurin Cordier.

Society of Jesus

JesuitJesuitsS.J.
Hence also the shorter conflict against the Jesuits, who claimed by word and action a share in its teaching.
On 15 August 1534, Ignatius of Loyola (born Íñigo López de Loyola), a Spaniard from the Basque city of Loyola, and six others mostly of Castilian origin, all students at the University of Paris, met in Montmartre outside Paris, in a crypt beneath the church of Saint Denis, now Saint Pierre de Montmartre, to pronounce the religious vows of poverty, chastity, and obedience.

College of Navarre

Collège de NavarreCollege de NavarreNavarre
The Collège de Navarre was founded in 1305, originally aimed at students from Navarre, but due to its size, wealth, and the links between the crowns of France and Navarre, it quickly accepted students from other nations.
The College of Navarre (Collège de Navarre) was one of the colleges of the historic University of Paris, rivaling the Sorbonne and renowned for its library.