Unnormalized form

UNFUnnormalized
Unnormalized form (UNF), also known as an unnormalized relation or non first normal form (NF 2 ), is a simple database data model (organization of data in a database) lacking the efficiency of database normalization.wikipedia
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Database normalization

normalizationnormalizednormal form
Unnormalized form (UNF), also known as an unnormalized relation or non first normal form (NF 2 ), is a simple database data model (organization of data in a database) lacking the efficiency of database normalization.
That means that, having data in unnormalized form (the least normalized) and aiming to achieve the highest level of normalization, the first step would be to ensure compliance to first normal form, the second step would be to ensure second normal form is satisfied, and so forth in order mentioned above, until the data conform to sixth normal form.

Data redundancy

redundancyredundantredundant data
An unnormalized data model will suffer the pitfalls of data redundancy, where multiple values and/or complex data structures may be stored within a single field or attribute, or where fields may be replicated within a single table (a way of subverting the first normal form rule of one value per field or attribute).
Often this is found in Unnormalized database designs and results in the complication of database management, introducing the risk of corrupting the data, and increasing the required amount of storage.

Denormalization

denormalizeddatabase denormalization
Denormalization should not be confused with Unnormalized form.

Database

database management systemdatabasesDBMS
Unnormalized form (UNF), also known as an unnormalized relation or non first normal form (NF 2 ), is a simple database data model (organization of data in a database) lacking the efficiency of database normalization.

Data model

structured datastructuredData models
Unnormalized form (UNF), also known as an unnormalized relation or non first normal form (NF 2 ), is a simple database data model (organization of data in a database) lacking the efficiency of database normalization.

First normal form

1NF
An unnormalized data model will suffer the pitfalls of data redundancy, where multiple values and/or complex data structures may be stored within a single field or attribute, or where fields may be replicated within a single table (a way of subverting the first normal form rule of one value per field or attribute). If the form contains atomic fields, then the model can be considered in 1NF form.

Relation (database)

relationrelation schemarelations
A relation in unnormalized form is used to represent the data entered by a user through a form.

Atomicity (database systems)

atomicityatomicatomic transaction
If the form contains atomic fields, then the model can be considered in 1NF form.

Relational model

relationalrelational data modelrelationships
Data in unnormalized form would not be considered to be relational since it lacks atomic data. In 1970, E.F. Codd proposed the relational data model, now widely accepted as the standard data model.

Edgar F. Codd

E. F. CoddE.F. CoddCodd
In 1970, E.F. Codd proposed the relational data model, now widely accepted as the standard data model.

Office automation

office automation softwareOffice Automation Systems (OAS)automation tool
At that time, office automation was the major use of data storage systems, which resulted in the proposal of many NF 2 data models like the Schek model, Jaeschke models (Non-recursive and recursive algebra), and the Nested Table Data (NTD) model.

IBM

International Business MachinesIBM CorporationInternational Business Machines Corporation
IBM organized the first international workshop exclusively on this topic in 1987 which was held in Darmstadt, Germany.

Darmstadt

Darmstadt, GermanyHessen-DarmstadtDA
IBM organized the first international workshop exclusively on this topic in 1987 which was held in Darmstadt, Germany.

NoSQL

Structured storagenon-relationalNoSQL Database
Since the turn of the century, NoSQL databases have become popular owing to the demands of Web 2.0. Some examples of NoSQL databases are MongoDB, Apache Cassandra and Redis.

Web 2.0

Enterprise 2.02.0Web2.0
Since the turn of the century, NoSQL databases have become popular owing to the demands of Web 2.0.

Google

Google Inc.Google, Inc.Google LLC
Today, companies like Google, Amazon and Facebook deal with large amounts of data that are difficult to store efficiently.

Amazon (company)

Amazon.comAmazonAmazon.co.uk
Today, companies like Google, Amazon and Facebook deal with large amounts of data that are difficult to store efficiently.

Facebook

Facebook LiveFacebook.comFacebook, Inc.
Today, companies like Google, Amazon and Facebook deal with large amounts of data that are difficult to store efficiently.

MongoDB

MongoDB Compass
Some examples of NoSQL databases are MongoDB, Apache Cassandra and Redis.

Apache Cassandra

Cassandra
Some examples of NoSQL databases are MongoDB, Apache Cassandra and Redis.

Redis

logging database updates for persistenceRedisDB
Some examples of NoSQL databases are MongoDB, Apache Cassandra and Redis.

Scalability

scalablescalescale-out
These databases are more scalable and easier to query with as they do not involve expensive operations like JOIN.

Join (SQL)

joinjoinsInner join
These databases are more scalable and easier to query with as they do not involve expensive operations like JOIN.