Unsimulated sex

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In the film industry, unsimulated sex is the presentation in a film of sex scenes where the actors engage in an actual sex act and are not just miming or simulating the actions.wikipedia
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Blue Movie

Blue Movie'' (1970 book)
Beginning in the late 1960s, most notably with Blue Movie by Andy Warhol, mainstream movies began pushing boundaries in terms of what was presented on screen.
Blue Movie, the first adult erotic film depicting explicit sex to receive wide theatrical release in the United States, is a seminal film in the Golden Age of Porn (1969–1984) and helped inaugurate the "porno chic" phenomenon in modern American culture, and later, in many other countries throughout the world.

Sex in film

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In the film industry, unsimulated sex is the presentation in a film of sex scenes where the actors engage in an actual sex act and are not just miming or simulating the actions.
French filmmaker Catherine Breillat caused controversy with unsimulated sex in her films Romance (1999) and Anatomy of Hell (2004).

9 Songs

From the end of the 1970s until the late 1990s it was rare to see hardcore scenes in mainstream cinema, but this changed with the success of Lars von Trier's The Idiots (1998), which heralded a wave of art-house films with explicit content, such as Romance (1999), Baise-moi (2000), Intimacy (2001), Vincent Gallo's The Brown Bunny (2003), and Michael Winterbottom's 9 Songs (2004).
It was controversial upon original release due to its sexual content, which included unsimulated footage of the two leads, Kieran O'Brien and Margo Stilley, having sexual intercourse and performing oral sex as well as a scene of ejaculation.

Romance (1999 film)

RomanceRomance'' (1999 film)1999
From the end of the 1970s until the late 1990s it was rare to see hardcore scenes in mainstream cinema, but this changed with the success of Lars von Trier's The Idiots (1998), which heralded a wave of art-house films with explicit content, such as Romance (1999), Baise-moi (2000), Intimacy (2001), Vincent Gallo's The Brown Bunny (2003), and Michael Winterbottom's 9 Songs (2004).
Romance is one of several arthouse films featuring explicit, unsimulated sex, along with The Brown Bunny (2003), 9 Songs (2004), All About Anna (2005), and Shortbus (2006).

Golden Age of Porn

porno chicGolden Ageporn chic
Blue Movie by Andy Warhol, released in June 1969, and, more freely, Mona, by Bill Osco, released afterwards in August 1970, were the first films depicting explicit sex to receive wide theatrical distribution in the United States.

Intimacy (2001 film)

IntimacyIntimité2001 film of the same name
From the end of the 1970s until the late 1990s it was rare to see hardcore scenes in mainstream cinema, but this changed with the success of Lars von Trier's The Idiots (1998), which heralded a wave of art-house films with explicit content, such as Romance (1999), Baise-moi (2000), Intimacy (2001), Vincent Gallo's The Brown Bunny (2003), and Michael Winterbottom's 9 Songs (2004).
This mainstream-defined film contains an unsimulated fellatio scene by Fox on Rylance.

Baise-moi

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From the end of the 1970s until the late 1990s it was rare to see hardcore scenes in mainstream cinema, but this changed with the success of Lars von Trier's The Idiots (1998), which heralded a wave of art-house films with explicit content, such as Romance (1999), Baise-moi (2000), Intimacy (2001), Vincent Gallo's The Brown Bunny (2003), and Michael Winterbottom's 9 Songs (2004).
The film, co-directed by Coralie Trinh Thi who had previously worked as a pornographic actress, included several unsimulated sex scenes.

In the Realm of the Senses

Ai No CorridaAi no korîdaAi no Korīda / L'Empire des Sens
It generated great controversy during its release; while intended for mainstream wide release, it contains scenes of unsimulated sexual activity between the actors (Tatsuya Fuji and Eiko Matsuda, among others).

Caligula (film)

CaligulaCaligolaCaligula'' (film)
He also cast Penthouse Pets as extras in unsimulated sex scenes filmed during post-production by himself and Giancarlo Lui.

Love (2015 film)

LoveKlara KristinLove'' (2015 film)
In an interview after the release of his film Love (2015), when asked why audiences want to see realistic portrayals of sex, Gaspar Noé suggested it's really about power structures: "In most societies whether they’re western or not, people want to control the sexual behaviour or to organise it in a precise context. Sex is like a danger zone. Sometimes class barriers fall down and it scares a lot of people. It’s about states controlling their systems, like religion."
The sex scenes were unsimulated and most were not choreographed.

Pornographic film

adult filmpornographic filmsadult video
The difference between these films and pornography is that, while such scenes might be considered erotic, the intent of these films is not solely pornographic.

Bedside-films

Bedside''-films
Notable examples include two of the eight Bedside-films and the six Zodiac-films from the 1970s, all of which were produced in Denmark and had many pornographic sex scenes, but were nevertheless considered mainstream films, all having mainstream casts and crews, and premiering in mainstream cinemas.

Zodiac-films

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Notable examples include two of the eight Bedside-films and the six Zodiac-films from the 1970s, all of which were produced in Denmark and had many pornographic sex scenes, but were nevertheless considered mainstream films, all having mainstream casts and crews, and premiering in mainstream cinemas.

Droid (film)

DroidDroid'' (film)
Examples of this type of hybrid release include Alice in Wonderland (1976), shot as X-rated, but first released as an R-rated version—afterwards, the uncut version was released; Café Flesh (1982)—the R-rated version of this science fiction porn film was released to mainstream cinemas; Stocks and Blondes (1984), originally available as Wanda Whips Wall Street; and Droid (1988), originally released as Cabaret Sin in 1987.
* List of mainstream movies with unsimulated sex

A Virgin Among the Living Dead

Christine, Princess of EroticismLa nuit des étoiles filantes

Shortbus

Shortbus soundtrack
Shortbus includes a variety of explicit scenes containing non-simulated sexual intercourse with visible penetration and male ejaculation.

The Devil in Miss Jones

The New Devil in Miss JonesThe Devil in Miss Jones 2The Devil In Miss Jones Part II

Lie with Me

The film contains graphic, unsimulated sexual content.

Kindergarten (1989 film)

Kindergarten1989Kindergarten'' (1989 film)
The film sparked controversy due to its perceived mistreatment of child actors (the protagonist, an eleven-year-old, spends most of his screen-time naked), as well as a number of censored scenes: an adult woman and a child take a bath together, the same woman later on makes suggestive advances on the child, plus the inclusion of an apparently unrelated, explicit and unsimulated oral sex scene.