Unsuccessful nominations to the Supreme Court of the United States

defeateddefeated nomineefailed nominationsfailed nomineenomination's defeatnominationsSupreme Court nomination rejectedtwelveunsuccessfulunsuccessful nominee
The Supreme Court of the United States is the highest ranking judicial body in the United States.wikipedia
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Supreme Court of the United States

United States Supreme CourtU.S. Supreme CourtSupreme Court
The Supreme Court of the United States is the highest ranking judicial body in the United States.
Rejections are relatively uncommon; the Senate has explicitly rejected twelve Supreme Court nominees, most recently Robert Bork, nominated by President Ronald Reagan in 1987.

Wheeler Hazard Peckham

Wheeler H. PeckhamMiller, Peckham & Dixon
Cleveland's follow-up nominee Wheeler Hazard Peckham was also rejected by the Senate, 32–41, on February 16, 1894.
Wheeler Hazard Peckham (January 1, 1833 – September 27, 1905) was an American lawyer from New York and a failed nominee to the Supreme Court of the United States.

Owen Roberts

Owen J. RobertsOwen Josephus RobertsJustice Roberts
Hoover's second nominee, Owen J. Roberts, was confirmed by the Senate.
Roberts was appointed to the Supreme Court by Herbert Hoover after Hoover's nomination of John J. Parker was defeated by the Senate.

G. Harrold Carswell

Harrold CarswellG. Harold CarswellGeorge Harrold Carswell
In response, Nixon nominated G. Harrold Carswell, a Southerner with a history of supporting segregation and opposing women's rights.
George Harrold Carswell (December 22, 1919 – July 13, 1992) was a United States Circuit Judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit, a United States District Judge of the United States District Court for the Northern District of Florida and an unsuccessful nominee to the United States Supreme Court.

Harry Blackmun

Justice BlackmunBlackmunHarry A. Blackmun
Nixon's third nominee for the Fortas vacancy was Harry Blackmun, who was confirmed by the Senate with no opposition on May 17, 1970.
His confirmation followed contentious battles over two previous, failed nominations forwarded by Nixon in 1969–1970, those of Clement Haynsworth and G. Harrold Carswell.

Ebenezer R. Hoar

Ebenezer Rockwood HoarE. R. HoarEbenezer
Ulysses S. Grant nominated Ebenezer R. Hoar to a new seat on the court.
* Unsuccessful nominations to the Supreme Court of the United States

John J. Parker

John Johnston ParkerJohn Parker
On May 7, 1930, Herbert Hoover's nomination of Appellate Judge John J. Parker for the Supreme Court was rejected by a vote of 39–41.
The rejection of his nomination by the United States Senate was the first such Supreme Court nomination rejected through a roll call vote since that of Wheeler Hazard Peckham in 1894.

Robert Bork

Robert H. BorkBorkBork, Robert H.
When Lewis Powell retired in July 1987, Ronald Reagan nominated Robert Bork.

Harriet Miers

Harriet E. MiersHarriet MyersHarriett Miers
In October 2005, George W. Bush nominated Harriet Miers, a corporate attorney from Texas who had served as Bush's private attorney and as White House Counsel, as an Associate Justice to replace retiring Justice Sandra Day O'Connor.

Unsuccessful nominations to the Cabinet of the United States

rejectedrejected by the Senatestepped down
*Unsuccessful nominations to the Cabinet of the United States
*Unsuccessful nominations to the Supreme Court of the United States

Court

court of lawcourtscourts of law
The Supreme Court of the United States is the highest ranking judicial body in the United States.

United States

AmericanU.S.USA
The Supreme Court of the United States is the highest ranking judicial body in the United States.

Article Three of the United States Constitution

Article IIIU.S. Const. art. IIIArticle III of the United States Constitution
Established by Article III of the Constitution, the detailed structure of the Court was laid down by the 1st United States Congress in 1789.

1st United States Congress

First CongressFirst United States Congress1st Congress
Established by Article III of the Constitution, the detailed structure of the Court was laid down by the 1st United States Congress in 1789.

Original jurisdiction

originalcourt of first instanceoriginal action
Congress specified the Court's original and appellate jurisdiction, created 13 judicial districts, and fixed the initial size of the Supreme Court.

Appellate jurisdiction

appellateappellate civil and criminal jurisdictionAppellate side
Congress specified the Court's original and appellate jurisdiction, created 13 judicial districts, and fixed the initial size of the Supreme Court.

Life tenure

lifetime tenurefor lifeappointed for life
Justices have life tenure, and so they serve until they die in office, resign or retire, or are impeached and removed from office.

Impeachment in the United States

impeachmentimpeachedimpeach
Justices have life tenure, and so they serve until they die in office, resign or retire, or are impeached and removed from office.

United States Senate

U.S. SenatorUnited States SenatorU.S. Senate
Justices are nominated by the president and then confirmed by the U.S. Senate.

Voting methods in deliberative assemblies

roll call voteshow of handsroll call
Of these, 11 nominees were rejected in Senate roll-call votes, 11 were withdrawn by the president, and 15 lapsed at the end of a session of Congress.

Legislative session

proroguedsessionparliamentary session
Of these, 11 nominees were rejected in Senate roll-call votes, 11 were withdrawn by the president, and 15 lapsed at the end of a session of Congress.

George Washington

WashingtonGeneral WashingtonGeneral George Washington
Among the six original nominees to the Supreme Court, George Washington nominated Robert H. Harrison, who declined to serve.

Robert H. Harrison

Robert Hanson HarrisonRobert HarrisonHarrison, Robert H.
Among the six original nominees to the Supreme Court, George Washington nominated Robert H. Harrison, who declined to serve.

James Iredell

IredellIredell, Jamesyoungest appointee
The seat remained empty until the confirmation of James Iredell in 1790.