A report on Upnor

Arethusa Venture Centre, with figure-head, Lower Upnor.
The Older London Stone standing in front of the fence of the Arethusa Venture Centre.
A Thames Barge sails past the depot: Upnor Castle (left), 'B' Magazine (centre), No. 5 Shell Store (right).
RE assault boat training at Upper Upnor
Former 'B' Magazine (1857) undergoing refurbishment.
Former Dry Guncotton Store (right, 1895)
Left to right: former No 3 Shell Store (1883), Mine Testing Room (1905) and Wet Guncotton Store (1895)
Left to right: Main entrance, former Filled Mine Store (1904), former Filled Shell Store (1904)

Lower Upnor and Upper Upnor are two small villages in Medway, Kent, England.

- Upnor
Arethusa Venture Centre, with figure-head, Lower Upnor.

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Upnor Castle on the River Medway

Upnor Castle

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Elizabethan artillery fort located on the west bank of the River Medway in Kent.

Elizabethan artillery fort located on the west bank of the River Medway in Kent.

Upnor Castle on the River Medway
Upnor Castle on the River Medway
Map of fortifications on the Rivers Thames and Medway
A picture by Willem Schellincks of the raid. The view is from the south. On the left Upnor Castle is silhouetted against the flames; on the opposite side of the river more to the front the burning dockyard of Chatham. To the north the conflagration near the chain is shown and on the horizon the ruins of Sheerness Fort are still smoking.
Display of gunpowder barrels and naval howitzers in the magazine block
View of Upnor Castle from the Medway in 1845
Annotated map of Upnor Castle
Upnor Castle House, behind the perimeter wall
The barracks inside the perimeter wall.
South side of the curtain wall
North side of the curtain wall
Water bastion, main building and north tower
West side showing the gatehouse
Magazine, south tower and inner courtyard, viewed from the gatehouse

It is in the village of Upnor, opposite and a short distance downriver from the Chatham Dockyard, at one time a key naval facility.

Medway

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Unitary authority district and conurbation in Kent, South East England.

Unitary authority district and conurbation in Kent, South East England.

Dutch Attack on the Medway, June 1667 by Pieter Cornelisz van Soest, painted c. 1667. The captured ship is right of centre
The Chatham Naval Memorial commemorates the 18,500 officers, ranks and ratings of the Royal Navy who were lost or buried at sea in the two World Wars. It stands on the Great Lines between Chatham and Gillingham.
Chatham High Street, December 2007
Chatham Bus Interchange Station, October 2011
The Quays, Chatham Dockside, December 2009
A view of the Medway Gate development, June 2009.
A view of former The Black Lion Leisure Centre (Now Medway Park), April 2009.
The A2 crossing the Medway at Rochester on the site of the Roman crossings, the medieval crossing was to the south
Junction Two of the M2 is on the A228, just before the Medway motorway bridge. Alongside is High Speed 1. Both are seen climbing up the Nashenden Valley, towards Bluebell Hill.

Frindsbury Extra including Upnor borders Strood.

Chattenden Barracks

Chattenden and Lodge Hill Military Camps

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Chattenden and Lodge Hill Military Camps were British Army training camps in Chattenden and Hoo St Werburgh in Kent.

Chattenden and Lodge Hill Military Camps were British Army training camps in Chattenden and Hoo St Werburgh in Kent.

Chattenden Barracks
Narrow-gauge locomotive in front of Chattenden barracks
Central Terrace: built as Police Quarters for those guarding the depot at Chattenden, later used for Explosive Ordnance Search & Disposal training.
Entrance to Lodge Hill Camp Firing Range
Former Police Office by the outer gate of the magazine compound at Chattenden.

During the Napoleonic Wars a gunpowder magazine was built alongside the castle at Lower Upnor designed to store a further 10,000 barrels of gunpowder, followed in 1857 by another, larger magazine which could hold up to 23,000 barrels.

Frindsbury Church from Church Green, showing behind the chalk cliffs formed by quarrying. In the far distance is Chatham, showing how closely the Medway Towns are interlinked.

Frindsbury

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Part of the Medway Towns conurbation in Kent, southern England.

Part of the Medway Towns conurbation in Kent, southern England.

Frindsbury Church from Church Green, showing behind the chalk cliffs formed by quarrying. In the far distance is Chatham, showing how closely the Medway Towns are interlinked.
Here we see how Strood the marshy place, relates to Frindsbury. The station, canal basin and all the wharves downstream of the Watermill were in Frindsbury. The steep slopes are caused by the chalk pits. Note also the undrained land between the railway, and Frindsbury Hill, and the lack of houses.
View of the south end of the barn
Frindsbury Church stood on a hill overlooking the Medway. The hill has been extensively quarried leaving the distinctive cliffs. To the left of the church is Church Green. Directly in front of it is Strood Pier and the entrance to the Strood basin. To the right is the Frindsbury Peninsula, and the Phoenix Wharf and Lower Curel's Yard.

Within the civil parish of Frindsbury Extra are the villages of Frindsbury, Wainscott, and Upnor.

1809 drawing by Benjamin Henry Latrobe showing the elevation, cross-section, and plan of a proposed gunpowder magazine

Gunpowder magazine

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Magazine designed to store the explosive gunpowder in wooden barrels for safety.

Magazine designed to store the explosive gunpowder in wooden barrels for safety.

1809 drawing by Benjamin Henry Latrobe showing the elevation, cross-section, and plan of a proposed gunpowder magazine
Fort William gunpowder magazine
Camden Fort Meagher Magazine
Gunpowder magazine on St Helen's Bastion at Fort Manoel
Gunpowder magazine on Guardian Angel Bastion at Fort Chambray
A drawing of the Barout khaneh, a Powder tower in Tehran, by Eugène Flandin, 1840
Bathurst Old Powder Magazine
Tilbury: a unique pair of early 18th-century magazines within the Fort
Gunpowder magazine, Berwick
HMS Talbot at Beckton, London
Royal Gunpowder Magazine No. 5, Purfleet, Essex
The Magazine, Hyde Park
Bull Point Barracks Gatehouse
The 18th-century 'A' Magazine at Priddy's Hard
Magazine, the old gunpowder store at Sedgeford
Magazine of 1857 (centre) alongside Upnor Castle (left)
Alternating magazine and traverse buildings (left) inside the boundary wall (right) at Weedon Bec
The remote situation of a gunpowder magazine near Kilmarnock in 1819. It had gone by 1880 because of the expansion of the town.
Irvine circa 1870. The Old parish kirk, manse and gunpowder magazine are prominent on the right bank of the river.
The old Powder or Pouther magazine at Irvine dating from 1642.
Dumbarton Castle magazine
Internal detail of Dockra Powder House
The door of Dockra Powder House
Detail of locking mechanism of Dockra Powder House
The gunpowder magazine of Dockra Powder House
Camp Parapet Powder Magazine, Louisiana

Upnor, Chattenden and Lodge Hill depots remained in military ownership until the mid-2010s, when the MOD marketed the land for housing and commercial use.

RNAD Dean Hill: photograph taken inside Magazine No. 16 during the Second World War.

Royal Naval Armaments Depot

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Armament depot (or a group of depots) dedicated to supplying the Royal Navy (as well as, at various times, the Royal Air Force, the British Army and foreign and Commonwealth forces).

Armament depot (or a group of depots) dedicated to supplying the Royal Navy (as well as, at various times, the Royal Air Force, the British Army and foreign and Commonwealth forces).

RNAD Dean Hill: photograph taken inside Magazine No. 16 during the Second World War.
Upnor Castle served as a magazine and store from 1668 to 1913, and continued in military use (as part of RNAD Upnor) until 1945.
Building 21, Royal Arsenal, Woolwich: Headquarters of the Naval Ordnance Store Department and its successors until 1967.
Entrance to one of the underground magazines at Dean Hill in the early 1940s.

In times of conflict the demand for provision (and therefore storage) of gunpowder grew, so additional magazines were built during the French Revolutionary Wars at Tipner (from 1788) and Weedon (from 1802), and during the Napoleonic Wars at Upnor (from 1806) and Marchwood (from 1811).

The Arethusa Venture Centre at Lower Upnor

Shaftesbury Homes and Arethusa

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One of the United Kingdom's oldest children's charities.

One of the United Kingdom's oldest children's charities.

The Arethusa Venture Centre at Lower Upnor
The figurehead of Arethusa at the Shaftesbury Young People centre on the River Medway
Arethusa Memorial, Lower Upnor

The move to Upnor occurred in 1933, when the Arethusa was broken up and replaced with a steel-hulled nitrates clipper, the Peking.

River Medway

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River in South East England.

River in South East England.

Dusk at Lower Upnor on the Medway Estuary
Frindsbury Church above the former entrance to the Thames and Medway Canal
Lower Saxony arms coat of arms
The Medway flows through Tonbridge in many channels. The South Eastern Main Line crosses the Medway.
The Botany stream forms another channel in Tonbridge.
Tonbridge Castle, a motte-and-bailey castle from 1066.
The River Medway passes Tonbridge Castle and passes under Big Bridge.
Oak Weir Lock
River Bourne enters the Medway
Sluice Weir, on the right is the lock
The sluice at Yalding
Hampstead Lane Lock, Yalding
Bow Bridge, Wateringbury
Teston Lock
Upstream from Teston Bridge
Barges moored on the Medway at Aylesford
Medieval bridge at Aylesford
Grain and Thamesport, from Horrid Hill, Gillingham.
The Grain Tower at low tide.
The mouth of the Medway, looking from Grain to Sheerness.
And into the Thames, youngsters at Grain with Southend beyond.
M2 crossing the Medway.
Isle of Grain and the Medway Estuary from the air
Allington Lock and Sluice gates

The illustrations include the castles at Queenborough, Upnor, Leybourne, Tonbridge and Hever; Penshurst Place; and the bridges at Teston, Maidstone, Aylesford, East Farleigh, Barming, Branbridges and Tonbridge.

Portrait by Marcus Gheeraerts the Younger, 1591

Francis Drake

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Sir Francis Drake (c.

Sir Francis Drake (c.

Portrait by Marcus Gheeraerts the Younger, 1591
Portrait miniature by Nicholas Hilliard, 1581, reverse of "Drake Jewel", inscribed Aetatis suae 42, An(n)o D(omi)ni 1581 ("42 years of his age, 1581 AD")
A map of Drake's route around the world. The northern limit of Drake's exploration of the Pacific coast of North America is still in dispute. Drake's Bay is south of Cape Mendocino.
A replica of the Golden Hind at Bankside in London
Drake's landing in California, engraving published 1590 by Theodor de Bry
Drake viewing treasure taken from a Spanish ship, print courtesy New York Public Library
The "Drake Jewel" as painted by Gheeraerts the Younger in a 1591 portrait of Drake
Buckland Abbey in Devon
Map of Drake's Great Expedition in 1585 by Giovanni Battista Boazio
Drake's burial at sea off Portobello. Bronze plaque by Joseph Boehm, 1883, base of Drake statue, Tavistock.
Arms of Sir Francis Drake: Sable, a fess wavy between two pole-stars Arctic and Antarctic argent
Arms of Drake of Ash: Argent, a wyvern wings displayed and tail nowed gules.<ref name="Vivian 1895, p.292">Vivian, Lt.Col. J.L., (Ed.) The Visitations of the County of Devon: Comprising the Heralds' Visitations of 1531, 1564 & 1620, Exeter, 1895, p. 292, pedigree of Drake of Ash</ref> The Drake family of Crowndale and Buckland Abbey used the same arms but the tail of the wyvern is not nowed (knotted)<ref name="Vivian p.299">Vivian, p.299, pedigree of Drake of Crowndale and Buckland Abbey</ref>
Sir Francis Drake with his new heraldic achievement, with motto: Sic Parvis Magna, translated literally: "Thus great things from small things (come)". The hand out of the clouds is labelled Auxilio Divino, or "With Divine Help"<ref name=NationalTrust>{{cite web |url=http://www.nationaltrustimages.org.uk/image/169478 |title=Image details |publisher=National Trust Images |access-date=25 October 2012 |archive-date=3 September 2012 |archive-url=https://archive.today/20120903192626/http://www.nationaltrustimages.org.uk/image/169478 |url-status=live }}</ref>
Sir Francis Drake whilst playing bowls on Plymouth Hoe is informed of the approach of the Spanish Armada. Bronze plaque by Joseph Boehm, 1883, base of Drake statue, Tavistock
Eighteenth century portrait of the Spanish Armada by Philip James de Loutherbourg
Drake taking the surrender of Admiral Pedro de Valdés on the Spanish galleon Nuestra Señora del Rosario
This portrait, circa 1581, may have been copied from Hilliard's [[:Image:Sfdrake42.jpg|miniature]]—note the similar shirt—and the somewhat oddly-proportioned body, added by an artist who did not have access to Drake. National Portrait Gallery, London.
Bronze statue in Tavistock, in the parish of which he was born, by Joseph Boehm, 1883.
Drake Jewel, on loan at the Victoria and Albert Museum, London

He was ordained deacon and was made vicar of Upnor Church on the Medway.

Frindsbury Extra

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Civil parish divided into commercial, suburban residential and rural parts on the Hoo Peninsula in Medway, a ceremonial part of Kent.

Civil parish divided into commercial, suburban residential and rural parts on the Hoo Peninsula in Medway, a ceremonial part of Kent.

Upnor on the Medway