Uranus

Uranian34 TauriGeorgium SidusUranian magnetospherecoronadiscovery of Uranusmagnetosphere of UranusU'''ranusUranian system
Uranus (from the Latin name "Ūranus" for the Greek god Οὐρανός) is the seventh planet from the Sun.wikipedia
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Neptune

NeptunianNeptune-masseighth planet
Uranus is similar in composition to Neptune, and both have bulk chemical compositions which differ from that of the larger gas giants Jupiter and Saturn. On 23 September 1846, Johann Gottfried Galle located a new planet, later named Neptune, at nearly the position predicted by Le Verrier.
Neptune is 17 times the mass of Earth and is slightly more massive than its near-twin Uranus, which is 15 times the mass of Earth and slightly larger than Neptune.

Jupiter

Jovianplanet JupiterGiove
Uranus is similar in composition to Neptune, and both have bulk chemical compositions which differ from that of the larger gas giants Jupiter and Saturn.
Jupiter and Saturn are gas giants; the other two giant planets, Uranus and Neptune, are ice giants.

Solar System

outer Solar Systeminner Solar SystemSol system
It has the third-largest planetary radius and fourth-largest planetary mass in the Solar System. Sir William Herschel announced its discovery on 13 March 1781, expanding the known boundaries of the Solar System for the first time in history and making Uranus the first planet discovered with a telescope.
The two largest, Jupiter and Saturn, are gas giants, being composed mainly of hydrogen and helium; the two outermost planets, Uranus and Neptune, are ice giants, being composed mostly of substances with relatively high melting points compared with hydrogen and helium, called volatiles, such as water, ammonia and methane.

Rings of Uranus

ringsring systemε ring
Like the other giant planets, Uranus has a ring system, a magnetosphere, and numerous moons.
The rings of Uranus are a system of rings around the planet Uranus, intermediate in complexity between the more extensive set around Saturn and the simpler systems around Jupiter and Neptune.

Planet

planetsFormer classification of planetsplanetary-mass object
Uranus (from the Latin name "Ūranus" for the Greek god Οὐρανός) is the seventh planet from the Sun.
In order of increasing distance from the Sun, they are the four terrestrials, Mercury, Venus, Earth, and Mars, then the four giant planets, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune.

Ammonia

NH 3 anhydrous ammonialiquid ammonia
Uranus' atmosphere is similar to Jupiter's and Saturn's in its primary composition of hydrogen and helium, but it contains more "ices" such as water, ammonia, and methane, along with traces of other hydrocarbons.
Ammonia is also found throughout the Solar System on Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and Pluto, among other places: on smaller, icy planets such as Pluto, ammonia can act as a geologically important antifreeze, as a mixture of water and ammonia can have a melting point as low as 173 K if the ammonia concentration is high enough and thus allow such planets to retain internal oceans and active geology at a far lower temperature than would be possible with water alone.

Ice giant

ice giantsice giant planetice giant planets
For this reason, scientists often classify Uranus and Neptune as "ice giants" to distinguish them from the gas giants.
There are two ice giants in the Solar System: Uranus and Neptune.

Voyager 2

2VoyagerVoyager 2'' spacecraft
In 1986, images from Voyager 2 showed Uranus as an almost featureless planet in visible light, without the cloud bands or storms associated with the other giant planets.
Part of the Voyager program, it was launched 16 days before its twin, Voyager 1, on a trajectory that took longer to reach Jupiter and Saturn but enabled further encounters with Uranus and Neptune.

William Herschel

HerschelWilliamSir William Herschel
Sir William Herschel announced its discovery on 13 March 1781, expanding the known boundaries of the Solar System for the first time in history and making Uranus the first planet discovered with a telescope. Sir William Herschel observed Uranus on 13 March 1781 from the garden of his house at 19 New King Street in Bath, Somerset, England (now the Herschel Museum of Astronomy), and initially reported it (on 26 April 1781) as a comet.
This would, after several weeks of verification and consultation with other astronomers, be confirmed to be a new planet, eventually given the name of Uranus.

Saturn

Saturn's atmosphereExploration of Saturnhome planet
Uranus is similar in composition to Neptune, and both have bulk chemical compositions which differ from that of the larger gas giants Jupiter and Saturn.
Its equatorial and polar radii differ by almost 10%: 60,268 km versus 54,364 km. Jupiter, Uranus, and Neptune, the other giant planets in the Solar System, are also oblate but to a lesser extent.

John Flamsteed

FlamsteedFlamsteed, JohnSir John Flamsteed
The earliest definite sighting was in 1690, when John Flamsteed observed it at least six times, cataloguing it as 34 Tauri.
He also made the first recorded observations of Uranus, although he mistakenly catalogued it as a star, and he laid the foundation stone for the Royal Greenwich Observatory.

Giant planet

jovian planetgiant planetsJovian
Like the other giant planets, Uranus has a ring system, a magnetosphere, and numerous moons.
There are four known giant planets in the Solar System: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune.

Gas giant

gas giantsgiant planetJovian
Uranus is similar in composition to Neptune, and both have bulk chemical compositions which differ from that of the larger gas giants Jupiter and Saturn.
The term "gas giant" was originally synonymous with "giant planet", but in the 1990s it became known that Uranus and Neptune are really a distinct class of giant planet, being composed mainly of heavier volatile substances (which are referred to as "ices").

Johann Elert Bode

BodeJohann BodeJ. E. Bode
Berlin astronomer Johann Elert Bode described Herschel's discovery as "a moving star that can be deemed a hitherto unknown planet-like object circulating beyond the orbit of Saturn".
Bode determined the orbit of Uranus and suggested the planet's name.

Herschel Museum of Astronomy

Sir William Herschel observed Uranus on 13 March 1781 from the garden of his house at 19 New King Street in Bath, Somerset, England (now the Herschel Museum of Astronomy), and initially reported it (on 26 April 1781) as a comet.
William discovered Uranus whilst residing in the house in March 1781 using a 7' telescope designed and built in the attached workshop.

Uranium

Uuranium-238U 2
At the same time he is also described as a diligent and skilful astronomers of antiquity ... even more: Uranus was the father of Saturn and the Atlas, as the former is the father of Jupiter." Bode argued that the name should follow the mythology so as not to stand out as different from the other planets, and that Uranus was an appropriate name as the father of the first generation of the Titans. He also noted that elegance of the name in that just as Saturn was the father of Jupiter, the new planet should be named after the father of Saturn. In 1789, Bode's Royal Academy colleague Martin Klaproth named his newly discovered element uranium in support of Bode's choice. Ultimately, Bode's suggestion became the most widely used, and became universal in 1850 when HM Nautical Almanac Office, the final holdout, switched from using Georgium Sidus to Uranus.
The 1789 discovery of uranium in the mineral pitchblende is credited to Martin Heinrich Klaproth, who named the new element after the recently discovered planet Uranus.

Volatiles

volatileicesice
Uranus' atmosphere is similar to Jupiter's and Saturn's in its primary composition of hydrogen and helium, but it contains more "ices" such as water, ammonia, and methane, along with traces of other hydrocarbons.
Thus, Jupiter and Saturn are gas giants, and Uranus and Neptune are ice giants, even though the vast majority of the "gas" and "ice" in their interiors is a hot, highly dense fluid that gets denser as the center of the planet is approached.

John Couch Adams

AdamsAdams, John CouchJ. C. Adams
With time, discrepancies began to appear between the predicted and observed orbits, and in 1841, John Couch Adams first proposed that the differences might be due to the gravitational tug of an unseen planet.
The calculations were made to explain discrepancies with Uranus's orbit and the laws of Kepler and Newton.

Urbain Le Verrier

Le VerrierLeverrierLe Verrier, Urbain
In 1845, Urbain Le Verrier began his own independent research into Uranus's orbit.
The calculations were made to explain discrepancies with Uranus's orbit and the laws of Kepler and Newton.

Discovery of Neptune

apparent discrepanciescontroversial rolediscovered that very night
On 23 September 1846, Johann Gottfried Galle located a new planet, later named Neptune, at nearly the position predicted by Le Verrier.
By 1847, the planet Uranus had completed nearly one full orbit since its discovery by William Herschel in 1781, and astronomers had detected a series of irregularities in its path that could not be entirely explained by Newton's law of gravitation.

Oberon (moon)

Oberon
With a large telescope of 25 cm or wider, cloud patterns, as well as some of the larger satellites, such as Titania and Oberon, may be visible.
Oberon, also designated Uranus IV, is the outermost major moon of the planet Uranus.

Titania (moon)

TitaniaAtmosphere of Titania
With a large telescope of 25 cm or wider, cloud patterns, as well as some of the larger satellites, such as Titania and Oberon, may be visible.
Its orbit lies inside Uranus's magnetosphere.

Astronomical symbols

astronomical symbolastronomicalastronomy
Uranus has two astronomical symbols.
The symbols for Uranus were created shortly after its discovery.

Atmosphere

atmosphericatmospheresplanetary atmospheres
Uranus' atmosphere is similar to Jupiter's and Saturn's in its primary composition of hydrogen and helium, but it contains more "ices" such as water, ammonia, and methane, along with traces of other hydrocarbons.
The low temperatures and higher gravity of the Solar System's giant planets—Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune—allow them more readily to retain gases with low molecular masses.

Pluto

134340 Pluto(134340) Plutomass of Pluto
Its average distance from the Sun is roughly 20 AU. The difference between its minimum and maximum distance from the Sun is 1.8 AU, larger than that of any other planet, though not as large as that of dwarf planet Pluto.
In the 1840s, Urbain Le Verrier used Newtonian mechanics to predict the position of the then-undiscovered planet Neptune after analyzing perturbations in the orbit of Uranus.