A report on Urban area

Greater Tokyo Area, Japan, the world's most populated urban area, with about 38 million inhabitants
Greater Melbourne, Australia at night, seen from the International Space Station
Urban land area (km2), 2010
Urban areas with at least one million inhabitants in 2006
India gate panorama.
A street sign indicating the beginning of an urban area in Finland. The picture was taken in Vimpeli.
São Paulo, the largest city in Brazil, the largest city proper in the Southern Hemisphere, in the Americas, and the world's ninth-largest urban area by population.
Moscow, the capital and largest city of Russia
Saint Petersburg, the cultural capital and the second-largest city
Yekaterinburg, the fourth-largest city in the country.
Greater São Paulo at night seen from the International Space Station

Human settlement with a high population density and infrastructure of built environment.

- Urban area
Greater Tokyo Area, Japan, the world's most populated urban area, with about 38 million inhabitants

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Overall

Measures for urban sprawl in Europe: upper left the Dispersion of the built-up area (DIS), upper right the weighted urban proliferation (WUP)

Urban sprawl

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Defined as "the spreading of urban developments (such as houses and shopping centers) on undeveloped land near a city."

Defined as "the spreading of urban developments (such as houses and shopping centers) on undeveloped land near a city."

Measures for urban sprawl in Europe: upper left the Dispersion of the built-up area (DIS), upper right the weighted urban proliferation (WUP)
This picture shows the metropolitan areas of the Northeast Megalopolis of the United States demonstrating urban sprawl, including far-flung suburbs and exurbs illuminated at night.
Traffic congestion in sprawling São Paulo, Brazil, which, according to Time magazine, has the world's worst traffic jams.
Low-density housing placed between large farms in an exurban community in Tennessee
Sprawl in Milton, Ontario. This photograph is an example of Canadian exurban development, though recently attempts are made to reduce this type of development in many major cities.
Clustered commercial strips like this one in Breezewood, Pennsylvania are common in outer rural exurbs and suburbs in metropolitan areas.
Walmart Supercenter in Luray, Virginia.
The urban sprawl of Melbourne.
The Chicago metro area, nicknamed "Chicagoland".
Road Space Requirements
Major cities – per capita petrol use vs. population density
A majority of Californians live, commute, and work in the vast and extensive web of Southern California freeways.
The Metropolitan Green Belt first proposed by the London County Council in 1935.
Many Canadian cities feature numerous pockets of high density throughout even their most distant suburbs. As a result, some Canadian suburbs have skylines that rival large American cities. Pictured are the skylines of Burnaby, British Columbia, a suburb of Vancouver.
Business parks are strongly linked to car-dependent sprawl.

Urban sprawl has been described as the unrestricted growth in many urban areas of housing, commercial development, and roads over large expanses of land, with little concern for urban planning.

Partizánske in Slovakia – an example of a typical planned European industrial city founded in 1938 together with a shoemaking factory in which practically all adult inhabitants of the city were employed.

Urban planning

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Partizánske in Slovakia – an example of a typical planned European industrial city founded in 1938 together with a shoemaking factory in which practically all adult inhabitants of the city were employed.
1852 city plan of Pori by G.T. von Chiewitz
Berlin - Siegessäule. August 1963. Spacious and organized city planning in Germany was official government policy dating back to Nazi rule.
Street Hierarchy and Accessibility

Urban planning, also known as regional planning, town planning, city planning, or rural planning, is a technical and political process that is focused on the development and design of land use and the built environment, including air, water, and the infrastructure passing into and out of urban areas, such as transportation, communications, and distribution networks and their accessibility.

Dortmund

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Third-largest city in North Rhine-Westphalia after Cologne and Düsseldorf, and the eighth-largest city of Germany, with a population of 588,250 inhabitants as of 2021.

Third-largest city in North Rhine-Westphalia after Cologne and Düsseldorf, and the eighth-largest city of Germany, with a population of 588,250 inhabitants as of 2021.

"Seal of Dortmund, the city of Westphalia" [SIGILLVM TREMONIE CIVITATIS WESTFALIE]
Historical view of the German town of Dortmund by Georg Braun and Franz Hogenberg (between 1572 and 1618)
St. Marys and St. Reinolds in 1470
Old market St. Reinolds
Pre-industrial Dortmund in 1804.
French troops in Dortmund c. 1923–1925
Photo of part of the city center area around Liebfrauen church in 1945
Emscher River in Dortmund
Municipalities and neighbouring communities
Aerial view of urban Kreuzviertel
Dortmund coat of arms
Townhall Dortmund
Townhall Aplerbeck, one of twelve district councils
Results of the 2020 city council election.
Dortmund with RWE-Tower and churches of Reinoldi, Petri and Marien on the right
Typical Wilhelminian style houses
Dockland – young restaurant and bars scene
Cherry Blossom Avenue
Rheinische Straße
Hörde castle
Reinoldikirche and Marienkirche
The Ruhrschnellweg Section East Dortmund
Dortmund central railway station
Central business district "Wallring"
Central Business District "Rheinlanddamm"
Port Promenade
Cityring Concert, Freedom Square
Westenhellweg
Logistic Hub Harbour
Harenberg City Center
Westfalentower, regional studio of Sat.1
Dortmund is one of the least stressful cities in the world.
Botanischer Garten Rombergpark
Florianturm, Westfalenpark
Juicy Beats Festival, Westfalenpark
Museum of Art and Cultural History
DASA, Germany Occupational Health and Safety Exhibition
Mayday 2009 Westfalenhallen
Traditional bakery for Dortmunder Salzkuchen
Dortmunder Export
Panhas
Headquarters of the Borussia Dortmund sports club (BVB)
Headquarter DHB
Signal Iduna Park, the home stadium of Bundesliga club Borussia Dortmund, is the biggest stadium in Germany.
Stadion Rote Erde
Eissportzentrum Westfalenhallen
Friedrich Arnold Brockhaus
Wilhelm Canaris 1940
Marco Reus
Oldtown Hörde
Lake Phoenix
Kaiser Hill
Reinoldikirche
Marienkirche
St. Johannes Baptist
St. Peter in Syburg suburb
Moated castle Bodelschwingh
Bodelschwingh garden
Bodelschwingh bridge
Zollern II/IV Colliery
U-Tower
Phoenix-West coking plant
Port Authority
Opernhaus Dortmund
Museum für Kunst und Kulturgeschichte
German Football Museum
RWE Tower
HCC
IWO Tower
Ellipson
Interchange station Möllerbrücke
ICE 3 on the Dortmund Hauptbahnhof
Stadtbahnwagen B Light Rail Vehicle
Bombardier Flexity Classic tram
Metropolrad Ruhr, City Bike
Hörde Bahnhof – second biggest in Dortmund
Dortmund Airport – Main Terminal (T2)
Messe-Dortmund-Logo
Main Hall
Rosenterassen south entrance
Headquarter
TU Dortmund
Dortmund University of Applied Sciences and Arts
Department of at Design Max-Ophüls-Platz
Department of Architecture
Results of the second round of the 2020 mayoral election

Dortmund is an independent city located in the east of the Ruhr area, one of the largest urban areas in Europe (see also: megalopolis), comprising eleven independent cities and four districts with some 5.3million inhabitants.

New York City

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Most populous city in the United States.

Most populous city in the United States.

New Amsterdam, centered in the eventual Lower Manhattan, in 1664, the year England took control and renamed it "New York"
Fort George and the City of New York c. 1731. Royal Navy ships of the line are seen guarding what would become New York Harbor.
Columbia University was founded by royal charter in 1754 under the name of King's College.
The Battle of Long Island, the largest battle of the American Revolution, took place in Brooklyn in 1776.
Broadway follows the Native American Wickquasgeck Trail through Manhattan.
The current 5 boroughs of Greater New York as they appeared in 1814. Bronx was in Westchester County, Queens County included modern Nassau County, Kings County had 6 towns, one of which was Brooklyn, New York City is shown by hatching in southern New York County on the island of Manhattan, and Richmond County on Staten Island.
A construction worker atop the Empire State Building as it was being built in 1930. The Chrysler Building is behind him.
Manhattan's Little Italy, Lower East Side, circa 1900
The Stonewall Inn in Greenwich Village, a designated U.S. National Historic Landmark and National Monument, as the site of the June 1969 Stonewall riots and the cradle of the modern gay rights movement
United Airlines Flight 175 hits the South Tower of the World Trade Center on September 11, 2001.
The core of the New York City metropolitan area, with Manhattan Island at its center
Lower and Midtown Manhattan, as seen by a SkySat satellite in 2017
Central Park in Winter by Raymond Speers, in Munsey's Magazine, February 1900
Flushing Meadows–Corona Park was used in both the 1939 and 1964 New York World's Fair, with the Unisphere as the centerpiece of the latter and which remains today.
The Statue of Liberty on Liberty Island in New York Harbor is a symbol of the United States and its ideals of freedom, democracy, and opportunity.
View of The Pond and Midtown Manhattan from the Gapstow Bridge in Central Park, one of the world's most visited tourist attractions, in 2019
California sea lions play at the Bronx Zoo, the world's largest metropolitan zoo.
A map of racial distribution in New York, 2010 U.S. census. Each dot is 25 people:
The landmark Neo-Gothic Roman Catholic St. Patrick's Cathedral, Midtown Manhattan
Ultra-Orthodox Jewish residents in Brooklyn. Brooklyn has the largest Jewish community in the United States, with approximately 600,000 individuals.
The Islamic Cultural Center of New York in Upper Manhattan was the first mosque built in New York City.
Ganesh Temple in Flushing, Queens, is the oldest Hindu temple in the Western Hemisphere.
The New York Stock Exchange, by a significant margin the world's largest stock exchange per market capitalization of its listed companies, at US$23.1 trillion as of April 2018. Pictured is the exchange's building on Wall Street.
The Deutsche Bank Center as viewed from Central Park West
Times Square is the hub of the Broadway theater district and a media center. It also has one of the highest annual attendance rates of any tourist attraction in the world, estimated at 50 million.
The I Love New York logo, designed by Milton Glaser in 1977
Rockefeller Center is home to NBC Studios.
Times Square Studios, home of Good Morning America
Butler Library at Columbia University, described as one of the most beautiful college libraries in the United States
The Washington Square Arch, an unofficial icon of both New York University (NYU) and its Greenwich Village neighborhood
New York-Presbyterian Hospital, affiliated with Columbia University and Cornell University, the largest hospital and largest private employer in New York City and one of the world's busiest
The New York Police Department (NYPD) is the largest police force in the United States.
Police officers of New York Police Department (NYPD)
The Fire Department of New York (FDNY) is the largest municipal fire department in the United States.
The Stephen A. Schwarzman Headquarters Building of the New York Public Library, at 5th Avenue and 42nd Street
The fast-paced streets of New York City, January 2020
Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts
The Metropolitan Museum of Art, part of Museum Mile, is one of the largest museums in the world.
Smorgasburg opened in 2011 as an open-air food market and is part of the Brooklyn Flea.
As of 2012, the city had about 6,000 hybrid taxis (shown) in service, the largest number of any city in North America.
New York City Hall is the oldest City Hall in the United States that still houses its original governmental functions.
The New York County Courthouse houses the New York Supreme Court and other offices.
Eric Adams, the current and 110th Mayor of New York City
New York City is home to the two busiest train stations in the U.S., including Grand Central Terminal.
The New York City Subway is the world's largest rapid transit system by number of stations.
The Port Authority Bus Terminal, the world's busiest bus station, at 8th Avenue and 42nd Street
John F. Kennedy Airport in Queens, the busiest international air passenger gateway to the United States
The Staten Island Ferry shuttles commuters between Manhattan and Staten Island.
Yellow medallion taxicabs are widely recognized icons of the city.
8th Avenue, looking northward ("uptown"). Most streets and avenues in Manhattan's grid plan incorporate a one-way traffic configuration.
The George Washington Bridge, connecting Upper Manhattan (background) from Fort Lee, New Jersey across the Hudson River, is the world's busiest motor vehicle bridge.
The growing skyline of Long Island City, Queens (background),<ref>{{cite web|url=https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2018-10-30/nyc-s-fastest-growing-neighborhood-gets-180-million-investment|title=NYC's Fastest-Growing Neighborhood Gets $180 Million Investment|first=Henry|last=Goldman|date=October 30, 2018|publisher=Bloomberg L.P|access-date=October 30, 2018}}</ref> facing the East River and Manhattan in May 2017
The Grand Concourse in the Bronx, foreground, with Manhattan in the background in February 2018
St. George, Staten Island as seen from the Staten Island Ferry, the world's busiest passenger-only ferry system, shuttling passengers between Manhattan and Staten Island
The Asia gate entrance to the Bronx Zoo, the world's largest metropolitan zoo.
The Spanish Harlem Orchestra. New York City is home to nearly 3 million Latino Americans, the largest Hispanic population of any city outside Latin America and Spain.
The Financial District of Lower Manhattan including Wall Street, the world's principal financial center

Located at the southern tip of the state of New York, the city is the center of the New York metropolitan area, the largest metropolitan area in the world by urban landmass.

Population density (people per km2) by country, 2006

Population density

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Measurement of population per unit area, or exceptionally unit volume; it is a quantity of type number density.

Measurement of population per unit area, or exceptionally unit volume; it is a quantity of type number density.

Population density (people per km2) by country, 2006
Living population density by country
Population density (people per km2) map of the world in 1994. In relation to the equator it is seen that the vast majority of the human population lives in the Northern Hemisphere, as 67% of Earth's land area is there.
Population density (people per km2) map of the world in 2005
World environments map provided for comparison with maps above
Monaco is currently the most densely populated nation in Europe.
Mongolian Steppes. Mongolia is the least densely populated country in the world due to its harsh climate as a result of its geography.
This population cartogram of the European Union (2007–2012) uses areas and colors to represent population.

City population and especially area are, however, heavily dependent on the definition of "urban area" used: densities are almost invariably higher for the center only than when suburban settlements and intervening rural areas are included, as in the agglomeration or metropolitan area (the latter sometimes including neighboring cities).

Nigeria

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Country in West Africa.

Country in West Africa.

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Ceremonial Igbo pot from 9th-century Igbo-Ukwu
Yoruba copper mask of Obalufon from the city of Ife c. 1300
Royal Benin ivory mask, one of Nigeria's most recognized artifacts. Benin Empire, 16th century.
Frederick Lugard, 1st Baron Lugard who as Governor-General of Nigeria led the amalgamation of the Northern Nigeria Protectorate and Southern Nigeria Protectorate in 1914.
Emir of Kano with cavalry, 1911
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1953 postage stamp with portrait of Queen ElizabethII
Nnamdi Azikiwe, first president of Nigeria from 1963 to 1966
The Republic of Biafra in June 1967, when it declared its independence from the rest of Nigeria
Shehu Shagari was the first democratically elected President of Nigeria from 1979 to 1983.
Olusegun Obasanjo was civilian President of Nigeria from 1999 to 2007.
Muhammadu Buhari is currently serving as President of Nigeria, since 2015.
Nigerian National Assembly, Abuja
Nigerian Army self-propelled anti-aircraft gun
Nigerian Air Force Mil Mi-35P
The Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Abuja
Former Nigerian President Goodluck Jonathan (centre) with United States President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama in August 2014
Map of Nigeria with administrative divisions
Climate map of Nigeria
Palm plantation in Delta State
Rainforest range of Obudu Mountains
Clouds kissing the mountains of Obudu
A proportional representation of Nigeria exports, 2019
Farm ploughing in Kwara State
Oil facility at Bonny Island, Rivers State
PTDF – Petroleum Technology Development Fund
Countries by natural gas proven reserves (2014). Nigeria has the largest reserves in Africa.
Innoson vehicles
Steel factory in Ajaokuta
Meridien Akwa Ibom golf course park
Lekki Beach in Lagos
Substation in Abuja
Railway system in Nigeria, 2022
Second Niger bridge at Onitsha, artistic impression
SpaceX launch of CRS-11 with Nigeria EduSat-1 on board in 2017
Population density (persons per square kilometer) in Nigeria
Map of Nigeria's linguistic groups
The Abuja National Mosque
National Church of Nigeria, Abuja
Nigerian states that implement some form of sharia law (in green)
A hospital in Abuja
The University of Lagos
A Nigerian police officer at the Eyo festival in Lagos
End SARS is a decentralised social movement and series of mass protests against police brutality in Nigeria.
Nigerian women in tech
Lisa Folawiyo, Fashion Designer From Nigeria
An Eyo Iga Olowe Salaye masquerade jumping
Chinua Achebe's Things Fall Apart, Africa's most popular and best selling literary piece ever, has been translated into more than forty languages.
Wizkid is a popular musician in Nigeria, Africa and worldwide.
Nigeria at the 2018 FIFA World Cup
Nigerian football supporters at the 2018 FIFA World Cup in Russia
Imota Rice Mill, close to Lagos
Oil and gas fields in the Niger delta
Oil and gas fields in the Niger delta
The world's biggest distilling column at the Dangote refinery in comparison
The world's biggest distilling column at the Dangote refinery in comparison
Pharmacy in Epe
Ituen Basi, Lagos based Nigerian fashion designer

Lagos is the largest city in Africa, with a population of over 12 million in its urban area.

Essen

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Central and, after Dortmund, second-largest city of the Ruhr, the largest urban area in Germany.

Central and, after Dortmund, second-largest city of the Ruhr, the largest urban area in Germany.

Essen on an engraving from 1647
Essen Minster
Alte Kirche (Old Church, built 1887), Altenessen
large population growth
French troops enter Essen in 1923
Devastation of Krupp factory
View over Central Essen from Bottrop
Essen Minster overshadowed by the town hall
Results of the 2020 city council election.
Essen's coat of arms
The Handelshof Hotel with modified coat of arms and unofficial motto
Messe Essen logo
Ruhrschnellweg towards the central business district of Essen
Essen/Mülheim Airport
Borough of Kettwig, annexed in 1975. Despite its industrial history, Essen is generally regarded as one of Germany's greenest cities.
Stadion Essen
ThyssenKrupp headquarters in Essen
RWE AG headquarters in the business district
E.ON headquarters
RWE AG headquarters
Hochtief headquarters
Evonik Industries headquarters
Schenker AG headquarters
Postbank Essen
Deutsche Bank branch in the financial district
Emschergenossenschaft Essen
Messe Essen south entrance
Messe Essen, east entrance
Messe Essen south entrance
Folkwang University of the Arts
Zollverein School of Management and Design
Universität Essen
Folkwang University
Elisabethkrankenhaus Essen
University Hospital Essen
Main station
Essen Stadtbahn NF2-TW 1601
Essen Hauptbahnhof
Essen Hauptbahnhof in the city centre
Essen Hauptbahnhof subway station
Platforms at Kaiser-Wilhelm-Park
Coal mine Zollverein
Shaft XII of Zollverein
Zollverein entrance
Ruhrmuseum
Ruhrmuseum staircase
Golden Madonna of Essen
Golden Madonna of Essen
Cross of Otto and Mathilde, tenth century
St. Ludger Basilica
Synagogue, 1917
Synagogue 1922
Old Synagogue, 2010
Old Synagogue, 2014
Old Synagogue interior
Villa Hügel
Villa Hügel
Villa Hügel
Great hall
Essen Werden
Essen Werden
Essen Werden historic town centre
Protestant church Essen Werden
Essen Werden
Essen Werden, old town hall
Historic town centre of Kettwig
Essen Kettwig
Saalbau Essen
Museum Folkwang
Aalto Theatre
Colosseum Theater
Grillo-Theater
Grugahalle concert hall
Schloss Borbeck
Hugenpoet castle
Grugapark, Kranichwiese facing the Orangerie and the sculpture Orion
Grugapark, Sculpture "Trauer" by Joseph Enseling
Grugapark, Reichsgartenschau 1938, Keramikhof
Grugapark illuminated, 2015
Grugapark, Waterfall
Baldeneysee
Baldeneysee
Baldeneysee
Marketplace of Margarethenhöhe I
Margarethenhöhe houses
Sculptures by Friedrich Gräsel and Gloria Friedmann at the Moltkeplatz

Essen is located in the centre of the Ruhr area, one of the largest urban areas in Europe (see also: megalopolis), comprising eleven independent cities and four districts with some 5.3 million inhabitants.

From top, left to right: Melbourne skyline, Flinders Street Station, Shrine of Remembrance, Melbourne Cricket Ground, Royal Exhibition Building, Princes Bridge with Federation Square and St Paul's Cathedral.

Melbourne

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Capital and most-populous city of the Australian state of Victoria, and the second-most populous city in both Australia and Oceania.

Capital and most-populous city of the Australian state of Victoria, and the second-most populous city in both Australia and Oceania.

From top, left to right: Melbourne skyline, Flinders Street Station, Shrine of Remembrance, Melbourne Cricket Ground, Royal Exhibition Building, Princes Bridge with Federation Square and St Paul's Cathedral.
A late 19th-century artist's depiction of John Batman's treaty with a group of Wurundjeri elders
Melbourne Landing,1840; watercolor by W. Liardet (1840)
South Melbourne's "Canvas Town" provided temporary accommodation for the thousands of migrants who arrived each week during the 1850s gold rush.
A large crowd outside the Victorian Supreme Court, celebrating the release of the Eureka rebels in 1855
Elizabeth Street lined with buildings from the "Marvellous Melbourne" era
The Big Picture, the opening of the first Parliament of Australia on 9 May 1901, painted by Tom Roberts
ICI House, a symbol of progress and modernity in post-war Melbourne
Map of Melbourne and Geelong urban areas
Storm passing over Melbourne CBD in summer. Melbourne is said to have "four seasons in one day" due to its changeable weather.
Melbourne's CBD as viewed from above the Shrine of Remembrance, with Southbank and the Hoddle Grid visible.
Government House (left) and skyscrapers seen from the Royal Botanic Gardens
"Melbourne Style" terrace houses are common in the inner suburbs have undergone gentrification.
Victorian era buildings on Collins Street, preserved by setting skyscrapers back from the street
Melbourne is home to 61 skyscrapers, the two tallest being Australia 108 (left), the Southern Hemisphere's only 100-plus-storey building, and Eureka Tower (right).
Established in Melbourne's East End Theatre District in 1854, Princess Theatre is mainland Australia's oldest continuously operating theatre.
Known for its bars, street art and coffee culture, the inner city's network of laneways and arcades is a popular cultural attraction.
National Gallery of Victoria
Statue at the MCG of Australian rules football founder Tom Wills umpiring an 1858 football match. The first games of Australian rules were played in adjacent parklands.
Melbourne hosts the Australian Open, the first of four annual Grand Slam tennis tournaments.
The 19th-century Coop's Shot Tower enclosed in Melbourne Central, one of the city's major retail hubs
The Crown Casino and Entertainment Complex contributes AU$2 billion to the Victorian economy annually.
Queen Victoria Market is the Southern Hemisphere's largest open air market and a popular tourist attraction.
Established during the gold rush, Chinatown is the longest continuous Chinese settlement outside Asia.
St Patrick's Cathedral
Ormond College, part of the University of Melbourne
Parliament House with W-Class heritage tram in foreground.
Royal Children's Hospital
The Bolte Bridge is part of the CityLink tollway system.
Situated on the City Loop, Southern Cross station is Victoria's main hub for regional and interstate trains.
An E-class tram in St Kilda. The city's tram network consists of 475 trams and is the largest in the world.
Sugarloaf Reservoir at Christmas Hills in the metropolitan area is one of Melbourne's closest water supplies.
Victoria Police vehicle in the city centre.
Storm passing over Melbourne CBD in August. Melbourne is said to have "four seasons in one day" due to its changeable weather.
An X'Trapolis 100 train crosses an E-class tram in the Melbourne CBD. The city's tram network consists of 475 trams and is the largest in the world.

Its name generally refers to a 9993 km2 metropolitan area known as Greater Melbourne, comprising an urban agglomeration of 31 local municipalities, although the name is also used specifically for the local municipality of City of Melbourne based around its central business area.

New York metropolitan area

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Map of the counties in the four divisions of the New York Metropolitan Area
Nocturnal view of the New York City metropolitan area, the world's most brightly illuminated conurbation and largest urban landmass. Long Island extends 120 miles eastward from Manhattan, the central core of the conurbation.
Part of the Palisades Interstate Park, the cliffs of the New Jersey Palisades of Bergen County overlook the Hudson River as well as The Bronx and Upper Manhattan in New York.
Enveloped by the Atlantic Ocean and Long Island Sound, New York City and Long Island alone are home to approximately 11 million residents conjointly.
The Bear Mountain Bridge connecting Westchester and Orange Counties, New York, across the Hudson River, as seen from Bear Mountain
High Point Monument as seen from Lake Marcia at High Point, Sussex County, the highest elevation in New Jersey at 1803 ft above sea level.
The Village of Garden City in Nassau County, Long Island's Town of Hempstead, which with over 770,000 people is the New York metropolitan area's most populous individual municipality outside New York City.
Westhampton, Suffolk County, New York, on the East End of Long Island, December 2008
The Great Falls of the Passaic River in Paterson, Passaic County, New Jersey, dedicated as a National Historical Park in November 2011, incorporates one of the largest waterfalls in the eastern United States.
Downtown Trenton in Mercer County, including the New Jersey State House topped by its golden dome, alongside the Delaware River
Downtown New Brunswick, Middlesex County, New Jersey, an educational and cultural district undergoing gentrification
The Mohonk Mountain House, Ulster County, New York, in the Hudson Valley, was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1986.
Sugarloaf Hill in Putnam County, New York, in the Hudson Valley
A deer in a suburban street (Highland Park, Middlesex County, NJ)
Mohawk Mountain Ski Area, Cornwall, Litchfield County, Connecticut, in the Berkshire Mountains
Dingmans Falls in the Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area, Pike County, northeastern Pennsylvania
Downtown Stamford in Fairfield County, Connecticut
The New Haven Green Historic District in Connecticut was designated a National Historic Landmark District in 1970.
Aerial view of Newark, Essex County, New Jersey's most populous city
Public Library in Yonkers, Westchester County, New York
Barnum Museum in Bridgeport, Fairfield County, Connecticut's most populous city
Paterson, Passaic County, New Jersey, known as the "Silk City", seen here from Garret Mountain Reservation, is a prime destination for a diverse pool of international immigrants.
Peter Minuit is credited with the purchase of the island of Manhattan in 1626.
New Amsterdam, centered in the eventual Lower Manhattan, in 1664, the year England took control and renamed it New York
Little Italy, Lower East Side, Manhattan, circa 1900.
The United Nations Headquarters, established in Midtown Manhattan in 1952
Liberty Enlightening the World, known as the Statue of Liberty, on Liberty Island in New York Harbor, is a globally recognized symbol of both the United States and ideals such as freedom, democracy, and opportunity.
The Unisphere in Flushing Meadows – Corona Park, iconic of Queens, the most ethnically diverse U.S. county and a borough of New York.
The main concourse of Grand Central Terminal, which opened in 1913.
A flooded Avenue C in Manhattan just moments before the explosion at an electrical substation caused by Hurricane Sandy on October 29, 2012.
Spanish Harlem (El Barrio) in Upper Manhattan
Chinatown, Manhattan (紐約華埠). The New York metropolitan area is home to the largest population of overseas Chinese outside of Asia, over three-quarters of a million in 2013.
Bergen County (버겐 카운티), New Jersey, is home to [[List of U.S. cities with significant Korean-American populations#Top ten municipalities as ranked by Korean-American percentage of overall population in 2010|all of the nation's top ten municipalities by percentage of Korean population]], led by Palisades Park (벼랑 공원) (above), a borough where Koreans comprise the majority (52%) of the population.
India Square, Jersey City, New Jersey, known as Little Bombay, home to the highest concentration of Asian Indians in the Western Hemisphere.
The Rockefeller Center Christmas Tree, considered the “worldwide symbol of Christmas”, is an annual staple of the New York metropolitan area during the Holiday season
The New York metropolitan area is home to the largest gay and bisexual community in the United States and one of the world's largest.
Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory on the North Shore of Long Island is an internationally renowned biomedical research facility and home to eight scientists awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine.
The NY Stock Exchange on Wall St. is the world's largest by total market capitalization of listed companies.
Manhattan's Flatiron District was the cradle of Silicon Alley, now metonymous for the New York metropolitan region's high tech sector, which has since expanded beyond the area.
Butler Library at Columbia University, described as one of the most beautiful college libraries in the United States.
Low Library, the Neoclassical centerpiece of the Columbia University campus
The bronze clock on Harkness Tower at Yale University, a structure reflecting the Collegiate Gothic architectural genre
Watercolor of Cleveland Tower, Princeton University, seen in the noon autumn sun
The George Washington Bridge, connecting Washington Heights in Upper Manhattan across the Hudson River to Fort Lee in Bergen County, New Jersey, is the world's busiest motor vehicle bridge. Interstate 95 and U.S. Route 1/9 cross the river via the bridge, while U.S. Route 46, which lies entirely within New Jersey, ends halfway across the bridge at the state border with New York.
The Walkway over the Hudson, the world's longest pedestrian bridge, connects Ulster and Dutchess counties in New York.
The Long Island Expressway (I-495), viewing eastbound in Corona, Queens
Heavy traffic on the Garden State Parkway in Wall Township, Monmouth County, New Jersey
The AirTrain at JFK International Airport in Jamaica, Queens
Skyline of Six Flags Great Adventure in Jackson Township, Ocean County, New Jersey, the world's largest theme park in 2013. To the far left is Kingda Ka, the world's tallest roller coaster.

The New York metropolitan area, also commonly referred to as the Tri-State area (NY, NJ and CT), is the largest metropolitan area in the world by urban landmass, at 4669.0 mi2, and one of the most populous urban agglomerations in the world.

Mexico City

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Capital and largest city of Mexico, and the most populous city in North America.

Capital and largest city of Mexico, and the most populous city in North America.

The city was the place of Mexico-Tenochtitlan, the Aztec capital.
Storming of the Teocalli by Cortez and his Troops (1848)
Mexico City Metropolitan Cathedral's (1571–1813) 18th century painting. The cathedral was built by the Spaniards over the ruins of the main Aztec temple.
Mexico City in 1628
Palacio de Mineria, Mexico City. The elevation of silver mining as a profession and the ennoblement of silver miners was a development of the eighteenth-century Bourbon Reforms
A painting of the American assault on the Chapultepec Castle.
Mexican President and later dictator Porfirio Díaz (second from right) commissioned many of the ornate European style buildings constructed from the 1890–1910 and hoped for Mexico City to eventually rival European cities like Paris in opulence
Corpses in front of the National Palace during the Ten Tragic Days. Photographer, Manuel Ramos.
Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera house in San Ángel designed by Juan O'Gorman, an example of 20th-century Modernist architecture in Mexico
Students in a burned bus during the protests of 1968
First ladies Paloma Cordero of Mexico (left) and Nancy Reagan of the United States (right) with U.S. Ambassador to Mexico, John Gavin observing the damage done by the 1985 earthquake.
Satellite image of Mexico City
Trajineras in the canals of Xochimilco. Xochimilco and the historic center of Mexico City were declared a World Heritage Site in 1987.
Air pollution over Mexico City. Air quality is poorest during the winter.
The Chapultepec was an important park during the Aztecs whose access had been limited to its nobility, was declared open to the public by a decree of Charles V, Holy Roman Emperor in 1530, it is one of the world's largest city parks.
Lightning in the background of the Torre Mayor
Growth of Mexico city's area from 1900 to 2000
Basilica of Our Lady of Guadalupe in La Villa de Guadalupe, the main Catholic pilgrimage site in the Americas. It houses the original image of Our Lady of Guadalupe.
Secretariat of Health building
Central Campus of the University City of the UNAM. Since 2007 the University City is a UNESCO World Heritage Site.
The National Palace of Mexico
Senate of the Republic
Legislative Palace of San Lázaro
Offices of the Secretariat of Foreign Affairs
Mexico City's Legislative Assembly building
The 16 boroughs of Mexico City
Federal Police headquarters in Mexico City
The Paseo de la Reforma is a wide avenue designed by Ferdinand von Rosenzweig in the 1860s and was modeled after the Champs-Élysées in Paris.
Palacio de Hierro store
The Turibus runs through many of the most important tourist attractions in the city.
The Art Nouveau/Neoclassical Palacio de Bellas Artes is the prominent cultural center in the city
Receptions Hall at the Museo Nacional de Arte
lReconstruction of the entrance to the Hochob temple in the National Museum of Anthropology
Museo Soumaya
The City Theatre built in 1918.
A guajolota, a tamale torta invention.
Televisa headquarters in Mexico City
Azteca Stadium, the 21st largest stadium in the world
Autódromo Hermanos Rodríguez
Mexico City Arena
Mexico City Metro
Metrobús rapid transit bus stop station at Indios Verdes
The Anillo Periférico and Paseo de la Reforma in Miguel Hidalgo
Bicycles available for rental in Zona Rosa
Mexico City International Airport
Felipe Ángeles International Airport
Santa Fe is one of the centers of greatest economic activity in the city.
Central de Abasto is one of the two large wholesale markets in Mexico City, along with the Nueva Viga market, which specializes in fish and seafood.
Biblioteca Vasconcelos
Street tacos in Mexico City
A pesero or microbús

According to the most recent definition agreed upon by the federal and state governments, the population of Greater Mexico City is 21,804,515, which makes it the sixth-largest metropolitan area in the world, the second-largest urban agglomeration in the Western Hemisphere (behind São Paulo, Brazil), and the largest Spanish-speaking city (city proper) in the world.