Ursa Major

Great BearOrsa MaggioreBearUMaBig BearBig DipperGreatthe BearThe PloughUrsa
Ursa Major (also known as the Great Bear) is a constellation in the northern sky, whose associated mythology likely dates back into prehistory.wikipedia
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Ursa Minor

Little BearLittleLittle Dipper
Its Latin name means "greater (or larger) she-bear", standing as a reference to and in direct contrast with nearby Ursa Minor, the lesser bear. Ursa Major is primarily known from the asterism of its main seven relatively bright stars comprising the "Big Dipper", "the Wagon", "Charles's Wain" or "the Plough" (among others), with its stellar configuration mimicking the shape of the "Little Dipper". Also the asterism's two brightest stars, named Dubhe and Merak (α Ursae Majoris and β Ursae Majoris), can be used as the navigational pointer towards the place of the current northern pole star, Polaris in Ursa Minor.
Ursa Minor (Latin: "Lesser Bear", contrasting with Ursa Major), also known as the Little Bear, is a constellation in the Northern Sky.

Big Dipper

Northern DipperPloughBeidou
Ursa Major is primarily known from the asterism of its main seven relatively bright stars comprising the "Big Dipper", "the Wagon", "Charles's Wain" or "the Plough" (among others), with its stellar configuration mimicking the shape of the "Little Dipper".
The Big Dipper (US) or the Plough (UK, Ireland) is a large asterism consisting of seven bright stars of the constellation Ursa Major; six of them are of second magnitude and one, Megrez, of third magnitude.

Asterism (astronomy)

asterismasterismsconstellation
Ursa Major is primarily known from the asterism of its main seven relatively bright stars comprising the "Big Dipper", "the Wagon", "Charles's Wain" or "the Plough" (among others), with its stellar configuration mimicking the shape of the "Little Dipper".
For example, the asterisms known as The Plough (Charles' Wain, the Big Dipper, etc.) comprises the seven brightest stars in the International Astronomical Union (IAU) recognised constellation Ursa Major.

Beta Ursae Majoris

Merakβ UMaβ Ursae Majoris
Also the asterism's two brightest stars, named Dubhe and Merak (α Ursae Majoris and β Ursae Majoris), can be used as the navigational pointer towards the place of the current northern pole star, Polaris in Ursa Minor.
Beta Ursae Majoris (β Ursae Majoris, abbreviated Beta UMa, β UMa), also named Merak, is a star in the northern circumpolar constellation of Ursa Major.

IAU designated constellations by area

88 modern constellations by area25th28th of the 88 constellations
In antiquity, it was one of the original 48 constellations listed by Ptolemy (2nd century AD), and is now the third largest constellation of the 88 modern constellations.

Alpha Ursae Majoris

Dubheα UMaα Ursae Majoris
Also the asterism's two brightest stars, named Dubhe and Merak (α Ursae Majoris and β Ursae Majoris), can be used as the navigational pointer towards the place of the current northern pole star, Polaris in Ursa Minor. Except for Dubhe and Alkaid, the stars of the Big Dipper all have proper motions heading toward a common point in Sagittarius.
Alpha Ursae Majoris (Latinised from α Ursae Majoris, abbreviated Alpha UMa, α UMa), also called Dubhe, is, despite being designated "α" (alpha), the second-brightest object in the constellation of Ursa Major.

Flag of Alaska

Alaskan flagFlagstate flag
e.g. as the flag of Alaska.
The Big Dipper is an asterism in the constellation Ursa Major which symbolizes a bear, an animal indigenous to Alaska.

Constellation

constellationsEuropean constellationModern constellation
Ursa Major (also known as the Great Bear) is a constellation in the northern sky, whose associated mythology likely dates back into prehistory.
Another example is the popular northern asterism known as the Big Dipper (US) or the Plough (UK), composed of the seven brightest stars within the area of the IAU-defined constellation of Ursa Major.

Gamma Ursae Majoris

Phecdaγ UMaγ Ursae Majoris
γ Ursae Majoris, known as either Phecda or Phad ("thigh"), with a magnitude of 2.44.
Gamma Ursae Majoris (γ Ursae Majoris, abbreviated Gamma UMa, γ UMa), also named Phecda, is a star in the constellation of Ursa Major.

Delta Ursae Majoris

Megrezδ UMaδ Ursae Majoris
δ Ursae Majoris, or Megrez, meaning "root of the tail," referring to its location as the intersection of the body and tail of the bear (or the ladle and handle of the dipper).
Delta Ursae Majoris (δ Ursae Majoris, abbreviated Delta UMa, δ UMa), also named Megrez, is a star in the northern circumpolar constellation of Ursa Major.

Lynx (constellation)

LynxLynconstellation Lynx
Ursa Major borders eight other constellations: Draco to the north and northeast, Boötes to the east, Canes Venatici to the east and southeast, Coma Berenices to the southeast, Leo and Leo Minor to the south, Lynx to the southwest and Camelopardalis to the northwest.
Polish astronomer Johannes Hevelius formed the constellation in 1687 from 19 faint stars between the constellations Ursa Major and Auriga that earlier had been part of the obsolete constellation Jordanus Fluvius.

Zeta Ursae Majoris

Mizarζ Ursae Majoris80 Ursae Majoris
ε Ursae Majoris, known as Alioth, a name which refers not to a bear but to a "black horse," the name corrupted from the original and mis-assigned to the similarly named Alcor, the naked-eye binary companion of Mizar. Alioth is the brightest star of Ursa Major and the 33rd-brightest in the sky, with a magnitude of 1.76. It is also the brightest of the "peculiar A (Ap) stars," magnetic stars whose chemical elements are either depleted or enhanced, and appear to change as the star rotates.
Mizar is a 2nd magnitude star in the handle of the Big Dipper asterism in the constellation of Ursa Major.

Epsilon Ursae Majoris

Aliothε UMaε Ursae Majoris
ε Ursae Majoris, known as Alioth, a name which refers not to a bear but to a "black horse," the name corrupted from the original and mis-assigned to the similarly named Alcor, the naked-eye binary companion of Mizar. Alioth is the brightest star of Ursa Major and the 33rd-brightest in the sky, with a magnitude of 1.76. It is also the brightest of the "peculiar A (Ap) stars," magnetic stars whose chemical elements are either depleted or enhanced, and appear to change as the star rotates.
Epsilon Ursae Majoris (Latinised from ε Ursae Majoris, abbreviated Epsilon UMa, ε UMa), officially named Alioth, is, despite being designated "ε" (epsilon), the brightest star in the constellation of Ursa Major, and at magnitude 1.77 is the thirty-second brightest star in the sky.

Mizar and Alcor

MizarAlcorMizar-Alcor
ε Ursae Majoris, known as Alioth, a name which refers not to a bear but to a "black horse," the name corrupted from the original and mis-assigned to the similarly named Alcor, the naked-eye binary companion of Mizar. Alioth is the brightest star of Ursa Major and the 33rd-brightest in the sky, with a magnitude of 1.76. It is also the brightest of the "peculiar A (Ap) stars," magnetic stars whose chemical elements are either depleted or enhanced, and appear to change as the star rotates.
Mizar and Alcor are two stars forming a naked eye double in the handle of the Big Dipper (or Plough) asterism in the constellation of Ursa Major.

Eta Ursae Majoris

Alkaidη UMaη Ursae Majoris
η Ursae Majoris, known as either Alkaid or Benetnash, both meaning the "end of the tail." With a magnitude of 1.85, Alkaid is the third-brightest star of Ursa Major. Except for Dubhe and Alkaid, the stars of the Big Dipper all have proper motions heading toward a common point in Sagittarius.
Eta Ursae Majoris (Latinised from η Ursae Majoris, abbreviated Eta UMa, η UMa), officially named Alkaid, is a star in the constellation of Ursa Major.

Ursa Major Moving Group

Ursa Major StreamCollinder 285Ursa Major supergroup
A few other such stars have been identified, and together they are called the Ursa Major Moving Group.
The core of the moving group consists of 14 stars, of which 13 are in the Ursa Major constellation and the other is in the neighboring constellation of Canes Venatici.

Xi Ursae Majoris

ξ UMaξ Ursae MajorisAustralis
Another asterism known as the "Three Leaps of the Gazelle" is recognized in Arab culture, a series of three pairs of stars found along the southern border of the constellation; From southeast to southwest, the "first leap", comprising ν and ξ Ursae Majoris (Alula Borealis and Australis, respectively); the "second leap", comprising λ and μ Ursae Majoris (Tania Borealis and Australis); and the "third leap", comprising ι and κ Ursae Majoris, (Talitha Borealis and Australis).
Xi Ursae Majoris (ξ Ursae Majoris, abbreviated Xi UMa, ξ UMa), also named Alula Australis, is a star system in the constellation of Ursa Major.

Proper motion

proper motionsproper-motionhigh proper motion star
Except for Dubhe and Alkaid, the stars of the Big Dipper all have proper motions heading toward a common point in Sagittarius.
Ursa Major or Crux, for example, looks nearly the same now as they did hundreds of years ago.

Nu Ursae Majoris

ν UMaνν Ursae Majoris
Another asterism known as the "Three Leaps of the Gazelle" is recognized in Arab culture, a series of three pairs of stars found along the southern border of the constellation; From southeast to southwest, the "first leap", comprising ν and ξ Ursae Majoris (Alula Borealis and Australis, respectively); the "second leap", comprising λ and μ Ursae Majoris (Tania Borealis and Australis); and the "third leap", comprising ι and κ Ursae Majoris, (Talitha Borealis and Australis).
Nu Ursae Majoris (ν Ursae Majoris, abbreviated Nu UMa, ν UMa), also named Alula Borealis, is a double star in the northern circumpolar constellation of Ursa Major.

Mu Ursae Majoris

μ UMaTania AustralisAustralis
Another asterism known as the "Three Leaps of the Gazelle" is recognized in Arab culture, a series of three pairs of stars found along the southern border of the constellation; From southeast to southwest, the "first leap", comprising ν and ξ Ursae Majoris (Alula Borealis and Australis, respectively); the "second leap", comprising λ and μ Ursae Majoris (Tania Borealis and Australis); and the "third leap", comprising ι and κ Ursae Majoris, (Talitha Borealis and Australis).
Mu Ursae Majoris (μ Ursae Majoris, abbreviated Mu UMa, μ UMa), also named Tania Australis, is a binary star in the constellation of Ursa Major.

Lambda Ursae Majoris

λ UMaTania Borealisλ
Another asterism known as the "Three Leaps of the Gazelle" is recognized in Arab culture, a series of three pairs of stars found along the southern border of the constellation; From southeast to southwest, the "first leap", comprising ν and ξ Ursae Majoris (Alula Borealis and Australis, respectively); the "second leap", comprising λ and μ Ursae Majoris (Tania Borealis and Australis); and the "third leap", comprising ι and κ Ursae Majoris, (Talitha Borealis and Australis).
Lambda Ursae Majoris (λ Ursae Majoris, abbreviated Lambda UMa, λ UMa), also named Tania Borealis, is a star in the northern circumpolar constellation of Ursa Major.

Iota Ursae Majoris

ι UMaTalitha Borealis9 UMi
Another asterism known as the "Three Leaps of the Gazelle" is recognized in Arab culture, a series of three pairs of stars found along the southern border of the constellation; From southeast to southwest, the "first leap", comprising ν and ξ Ursae Majoris (Alula Borealis and Australis, respectively); the "second leap", comprising λ and μ Ursae Majoris (Tania Borealis and Australis); and the "third leap", comprising ι and κ Ursae Majoris, (Talitha Borealis and Australis).
Iota Ursae Majoris (ι Ursae Majoris, abbreviated Iota UMa, ι UMa), also named Talitha, is a star system in the northern circumpolar constellation of Ursa Major.

47 Ursae Majoris

47 UMaHD 95128
47 Ursae Majoris is a Sun-like star with a three-planet system.
47 Ursae Majoris (abbreviated 47 UMa), also named Chalawan, is a yellow dwarf star approximately 46 light-years from Earth in the constellation of Ursa Major.

Kappa Ursae Majoris

κ UMaTalitha AustralisAustralis
Another asterism known as the "Three Leaps of the Gazelle" is recognized in Arab culture, a series of three pairs of stars found along the southern border of the constellation; From southeast to southwest, the "first leap", comprising ν and ξ Ursae Majoris (Alula Borealis and Australis, respectively); the "second leap", comprising λ and μ Ursae Majoris (Tania Borealis and Australis); and the "third leap", comprising ι and κ Ursae Majoris, (Talitha Borealis and Australis).
Kappa Ursae Majoris (κ Ursae Majoris, abbreviated Kap UMa, κ UMa) is a binary star in the constellation of Ursa Major.

W Ursae Majoris

W UMaW Uma variable
W Ursae Majoris is the prototype of a class of contact binary variable stars, and ranges between 7.75 m and 8.48 m.
W Ursae Majoris (W UMa) is the variable star designation for a binary star system in the northern constellation of Ursa Major.