Ursula K. Le Guin

Ursula Le GuinUrsula K. LeGuinLe GuinThe Unreal and the RealThe Unreal and the Real: The Selected Stories of Ursula Le GuinUrsula K Le GuinUrsula Kroeber Le GuinUrsula LaGuinUrsula LeGuin
Ursula Kroeber Le Guin (October 21, 1929 – January 22, 2018) was an American author best known for her works of speculative fiction, including science fiction works set in her Hainish universe, and the Earthsea fantasy series.wikipedia
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Ursula K. Le Guin bibliography

twenty novels and over a hundred short storiesUrsula K. Le Guin
She was first published in 1959, and her literary career spanned nearly sixty years, yielding more than twenty novels and over a hundred short stories, in addition to poetry, literary criticism, translations, and children's books.
Ursula K. Le Guin (1929–2018) was an American author of speculative fiction, realistic fiction, non-fiction, screenplays, librettos, essays, poetry, speeches, translations, literary critiques, chapbooks, and children's fiction.

Earthsea

Earthsea CycleEarthsea seriesEarthsea (radio series)
Ursula Kroeber Le Guin (October 21, 1929 – January 22, 2018) was an American author best known for her works of speculative fiction, including science fiction works set in her Hainish universe, and the Earthsea fantasy series. Among them were "The Dowry of the Angyar", which introduced the fictional Hainish universe, and "The Rule of Names" and "The Word of Unbinding", which introduced the world of Earthsea.
Earthsea, also known as The Earthsea Cycle, is a series of fantasy books written by the American writer Ursula K. Le Guin and the name of their setting, a dense archipelago surrounded by an uncharted ocean.

The Left Hand of Darkness

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She began writing full-time in the late 1950s and achieved major critical and commercial success with A Wizard of Earthsea (1968) and The Left Hand of Darkness (1969), which have been described by Harold Bloom as her masterpieces.
The Left Hand of Darkness is a science fiction novel by U.S. writer Ursula K. Le Guin, published in 1969.

A Wizard of Earthsea

She began writing full-time in the late 1950s and achieved major critical and commercial success with A Wizard of Earthsea (1968) and The Left Hand of Darkness (1969), which have been described by Harold Bloom as her masterpieces.
A Wizard of Earthsea is a fantasy novel written by American author Ursula K. Le Guin and first published by the small press Parnassus in 1968.

Nebula Award for Best Novel

Best NovelNebula AwardNebula
For the latter volume, Le Guin won both the Hugo and Nebula awards for best novel, becoming the first woman to do so.
Ursula K. Le Guin has received the most Nebula Awards for Best Novel with four wins out of six nominations.

Always Coming Home

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Le Guin often subverted typical speculative fiction tropes, such as through her use of dark-skinned protagonists in Earthsea, and also used unusual stylistic or structural devices in books such as the experimental work Always Coming Home (1985).
Always Coming Home is a 1985 science fiction novel by Ursula K. Le Guin.

The Dispossessed

dispossessedPravicThe Dispossessed: An Ambiguous Utopia
Social and political themes, including gender, sexuality, and coming of age were prominent in her writing, and she explored alternative political structures in many stories, such as in the parable "The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas" (1973) and the utopian novel The Dispossessed (1974).
The Dispossessed: An Ambiguous Utopia is a 1974 utopian science fiction novel by American writer Ursula K. Le Guin, set in the fictional universe of the seven novels of the Hainish Cycle, e.g. The Left Hand of Darkness, about anarchist and other societal structures.

Theodora Kroeber

TheodoraTheodora Kracaw Brown
Le Guin was born in Berkeley, California, to author Theodora Kroeber and anthropologist Alfred Louis Kroeber.
Kroeber published several other works in her later years, including a collaboration with her daughter Ursula K. Le Guin and several anthropological texts.

Science fiction

sci-fiscience-fictionSci Fi
Ursula Kroeber Le Guin (October 21, 1929 – January 22, 2018) was an American author best known for her works of speculative fiction, including science fiction works set in her Hainish universe, and the Earthsea fantasy series.
1969's The Left Hand of Darkness by Ursula K. Le Guin was set on a planet in which the inhabitants have no fixed gender.

Hugo Award for Best Novel

Best NovelHugoHugo Award
For the latter volume, Le Guin won both the Hugo and Nebula awards for best novel, becoming the first woman to do so.

Neil Gaiman

GaimanGaiman, NeilGaiman, N.
Le Guin influenced many other authors, including Booker Prize winner Salman Rushdie, David Mitchell, Neil Gaiman, and Iain Banks.
As a child and a teenager, Gaiman read the works of C. S. Lewis, J. R. R. Tolkien, Lewis Carroll, Mary Shelley, Rudyard Kipling, Edgar Allan Poe, Michael Moorcock, Alan Moore, Steve Ditko, Will Eisner, Ursula K. Le Guin, Harlan Ellison, Lord Dunsany and G. K. Chesterton.

A. L. Kroeber

Alfred L. KroeberAlfred KroeberAlfred Louis Kroeber
Le Guin was born in Berkeley, California, to author Theodora Kroeber and anthropologist Alfred Louis Kroeber.
He was the father of the acclaimed novelist, poet, and writer of short stories Ursula K. Le Guin.

Dancing at the Edge of the World

It is listed as in American Rhetorics Top 100 Speeches of the 20th Century, and was included in her nonfiction collection Dancing at the Edge of the World.
Dancing at the Edge of the World is a 1989 nonfiction collection by Ursula K. Le Guin.

Nebula Award for Best Novelette

noveletteNebula AwardBest Novelette
Le Guin refused a Nebula Award for her story "The Diary of the Rose" in 1975, in protest at the Science Fiction Writers of America's revocation of Stanisław Lem's membership.
Ursula K. Le Guin has the most nominations of any author with seven, including one win and not including one withdrawn nomination.

Fantasy

fantasy fictionfantasiesfantastic
Ursula Kroeber Le Guin (October 21, 1929 – January 22, 2018) was an American author best known for her works of speculative fiction, including science fiction works set in her Hainish universe, and the Earthsea fantasy series.
Several other series, such as C. S. Lewis's Chronicles of Narnia and Ursula K. Le Guin's Earthsea books, helped cement the genre's popularity.

Locus Award for Best Novel

Best Novelfor Best NovelLocus Award
She received numerous accolades, including eight Hugos, six Nebulas, and twenty-two Locus Awards, and in 2003 became the second woman honored as a Grand Master of the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America.

City of Illusions

Two more Hainish novels, Planet of Exile and City of Illusions were published in 1966 and 1967, respectively, and the three books together would come to be known as the Hainish trilogy.
City of Illusions is a 1967 science fiction novel by American writer Ursula K. Le Guin.

The Dowry of the Angyar

Semley's NecklaceDowry of the AngyarThe Dowry of Angyar
Among them were "The Dowry of the Angyar", which introduced the fictional Hainish universe, and "The Rule of Names" and "The Word of Unbinding", which introduced the world of Earthsea.
"The Dowry of the Angyar" is a science fiction short story by American writer Ursula K. Le Guin, first published in 1964.

Planet of Exile

Two more Hainish novels, Planet of Exile and City of Illusions were published in 1966 and 1967, respectively, and the three books together would come to be known as the Hainish trilogy.
Planet of Exile is a 1966 science fiction novel by American writer Ursula K. Le Guin, part of her Hainish Cycle.

Rocannon's World

Ace Books released Rocannon's World, Le Guin's first published novel, in 1966.
Rocannon's World is a science fiction novel by American writer Ursula K. Le Guin, her literary debut.

Amazing Stories

AmazingAmazing Science FictionAmazing Science Fiction Stories
Her first professional publication was the short story "April in Paris" in 1962 in Fantastic Science Fiction, and seven other stories followed in the next few years, in Fantastic or Amazing Stories.
Writers whose first story was published in the magazine include John W. Campbell, Isaac Asimov, Howard Fast, Ursula K. Le Guin, Roger Zelazny, and Thomas M. Disch.

Fantastic (magazine)

FantasticFantastic Stories of ImaginationFantastic Stories
Her first professional publication was the short story "April in Paris" in 1962 in Fantastic Science Fiction, and seven other stories followed in the next few years, in Fantastic or Amazing Stories.
Goldsmith helped to nurture the early careers of writers such as Roger Zelazny and Ursula K. Le Guin, but was unable to increase circulation, and in 1965 the magazines were sold to Sol Cohen, who hired Joseph Wrzos as editor and switched to a reprint-only policy.

The Tombs of Atuan

Le Guin continued to develop themes of equilibrium and coming-of-age in the next two installments of the Earthsea series, The Tombs of Atuan and The Farthest Shore, published in 1971 and 1972, respectively.
The Tombs of Atuan is a fantasy novel by the American author Ursula K. Le Guin, first published in the Winter 1970 issue of Worlds of Fantasy, and published as a book by Atheneum Books in 1971.

The Word for World Is Forest

She won the Hugo Award again in 1973 for The Word for World is Forest.
The Word for World Is Forest is a science fiction novella by American writer Ursula K. Le Guin, first published in the United States in 1972 as a part of the anthology Again, Dangerous Visions, and published as a separate book in 1976 by Berkley Books.

The Rule of Names

Among them were "The Dowry of the Angyar", which introduced the fictional Hainish universe, and "The Rule of Names" and "The Word of Unbinding", which introduced the world of Earthsea.
"The Rule of Names" is a short story by American writer Ursula K. Le Guin, first published in the April 1964 issue of Fantastic, and reprinted in collections such as The Wind's Twelve Quarters.