Usenet

newsnetnewsnewsgroupmoderatedrec.sport.pro-wrestlingUsenet articlebinary retention timecomp.std.cInternet newsgroupsnetwork news
Usenet is a worldwide distributed discussion system available on computers.wikipedia
930 Related Articles

Usenet newsgroup

newsgroupnewsgroupsnews group
Users read and post messages (called articles or posts, and collectively termed news) to one or more categories, known as newsgroups.
A Usenet newsgroup is a repository usually within the Usenet system, for messages posted from many users in different locations using Internet.

UUCP

bang pathUUCPNETUnix to Unix Copy Program
It was developed from the general-purpose Unix-to-Unix Copy (UUCP) dial-up network architecture.
UUCP is an abbreviation of Unix-to-Unix Copy. The term generally refers to a suite of computer programs and protocols allowing remote execution of commands and transfer of files, email and netnews between computers.

Internet forum

forumforumsmessage board
Usenet resembles a bulletin board system (BBS) in many respects and is the precursor to Internet forums that are widely used today. Today, Usenet has diminished in importance with respect to Internet forums, blogs and mailing lists.
Early Internet forums could be described as a web version of an electronic mailing list or newsgroup (such as exist on Usenet); allowing people to post messages and comment on other messages.

Internet service provider

ISPinternet service providersISPs
Individual users may read messages from and post messages to a local server operated by a commercial usenet provider, their Internet service provider, university, employer, or their own server.
Internet services typically provided by ISPs include Internet access, Internet transit, domain name registration, web hosting, Usenet service, and colocation.

Jim Ellis (computing)

Jim Ellis
Tom Truscott and Jim Ellis conceived the idea in 1979, and it was established in 1980.
James Tice Ellis ( – June 28, 2001) was an American computer scientist best known as the co-creator of Usenet, along with Tom Truscott.

Dial-up Internet access

dial-updialupdial-up access
It was developed from the general-purpose Unix-to-Unix Copy (UUCP) dial-up network architecture.
In 1979, Tom Truscott and Steve Bellovin, graduates for Duke University, created an early predecessor to dial-up Internet access called the USENET.

Tom Truscott

Tom Truscott and Jim Ellis conceived the idea in 1979, and it was established in 1980.
Tom Truscott is an American computer scientist best known for creating Usenet with Jim Ellis, when both were graduate students at Duke University.

Spamming

spamspammersspammer
Usenet has significant cultural importance in the networked world, having given rise to, or popularized, many widely recognized concepts and terms such as "FAQ", "flame", and "spam".
It later came to be used on Usenet to mean excessive multiple posting—the repeated posting of the same message.

A News

It was originally built on the "poor man's ARPANET", employing UUCP as its transport protocol to offer mail and file transfers, as well as announcements through the newly developed news software such as A News.
A News, originally known simply as news, was the first widely distributed program for serving and reading Usenet newsgroups.

Newsreader (Usenet)

news clientnewsreaderNews reader
It was originally built on the "poor man's ARPANET", employing UUCP as its transport protocol to offer mail and file transfers, as well as announcements through the newly developed news software such as A News.
A newsreader is an application program that reads articles on Usenet (a distributed discussion system, which groups its content into a hierarchy of subject-related newsgroups, each of which contains multiple threads or discussions).

Peer-to-peer

P2Ppeer to peerpeer-to-peer network
The later peer-to-peer networks operate on a similar principle, but for Usenet it is normally the sender, rather than the receiver, who initiates transfers.
Therefore, USENET, a distributed messaging system that is often described as an early peer-to-peer architecture, was established.

News server

serverserverssites
Many Internet service providers, and many other Internet sites, operate news servers for their users to access.
A news server is a collection of software used to handle Usenet articles.

News server operation

news serversRetention (news server)
See also news server operation for an overview of how news systems are implemented.
Among the operators and users of commercial Usenet news servers, common concerns are the continually increasing storage and network capacity requirements and their effects.

Blog

blogsbloggerweblog
Today, Usenet has diminished in importance with respect to Internet forums, blogs and mailing lists.
Before blogging became popular, digital communities took many forms including Usenet, commercial online services such as GEnie, Byte Information Exchange (BIX) and the early CompuServe, e-mail lists, and Bulletin Board Systems (BBS).

Internet

onlinethe Internetweb
Usenet was conceived in 1979 and publicly established in 1980, at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and Duke University, over a decade before the World Wide Web went online and the general public received access to the Internet, making it one of the oldest computer network communications systems still in widespread use.
By Christmas 1990, Berners-Lee had built all the tools necessary for a working Web: the HyperText Transfer Protocol (HTTP) 0.9, the HyperText Markup Language (HTML), the first Web browser (which was also a HTML editor and could access Usenet newsgroups and FTP files), the first HTTP server software (later known as CERN httpd), the first web server, and the first Web pages that described the project itself.

Flaming (Internet)

flame warflame warsflaming
Usenet has significant cultural importance in the networked world, having given rise to, or popularized, many widely recognized concepts and terms such as "FAQ", "flame", and "spam".
Internet flaming was mostly observed in Usenet newsgroups although it was known to occur in the WWIVnet and FidoNet computer networks as well.

Alt.* hierarchy

altalt.*'' hierarchyalt'' hierarchy
The groups in alt.binaries are still widely used for data transfer.
The alt.* hierarchy is a major class of newsgroups in Usenet, containing all newsgroups whose name begins with "alt.", organized hierarchically.

Control message

newgroup messagermgroup messagecancel message
One little cited defense of propagation is canceling a propagated message, but few Usenet users use this command and some news readers do not offer cancellation commands, in part because article storage expires in relatively short order anyway.
Control messages are a special kind of Usenet post that are used to control news servers.

Network News Transfer Protocol

NNTPnews
On the Internet, Usenet is transported via the Network News Transfer Protocol (NNTP) on TCP Port 119 for standard, unprotected connections and on TCP port 563 for SSL encrypted connections which is offered only by a few sites.
The Network News Transfer Protocol (NNTP) is an application protocol used for transporting Usenet news articles (netnews) between news servers and for reading and posting articles by end user client applications.

Big 8 (Usenet)

Big 8Big SevenBig-8 hierarchy
Usenet newsgroups in the Big-8 hierarchy are created by proposals called a Request for Discussion, or RFD.
The Big 8 (previously the Big 7) are a group of newsgroup hierarchies established after the Great Renaming, a restructuring of Usenet that took place in 1987.

Transport Layer Security

SSLTLSSSL/TLS
On the Internet, Usenet is transported via the Network News Transfer Protocol (NNTP) on TCP Port 119 for standard, unprotected connections and on TCP port 563 for SSL encrypted connections which is offered only by a few sites.
Another mechanism is for the client to make a protocol-specific request to the server to switch the connection to TLS; for example, by making a STARTTLS request when using the mail and news protocols.

Talk.origins

talk.* – talk about various controversial topics (talk.religion, talk.politics, talk.origins)
talk.origins (often capitalised to Talk.Origins or abbreviated as t.o.) is a moderated Usenet discussion forum concerning the origins of life, and evolution.

Mozilla Thunderbird

ThunderbirdMozilla Thunderbird PortableThunderbird 1.5.0.2
Some clients such as Mozilla Thunderbird and Outlook Express provide both abilities.
For usenet news groups they offer the latest NNTPS.

World Wide Web

Webthe webweb-based
Usenet was conceived in 1979 and publicly established in 1980, at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and Duke University, over a decade before the World Wide Web went online and the general public received access to the Internet, making it one of the oldest computer network communications systems still in widespread use.
The hostname of a web server is often www, in the same way that it may be ftp for an FTP server, and news or nntp for a Usenet news server.

YEnc

In an attempt to reduce file transfer times, an informal file encoding known as yEnc was introduced in 2001.
yEnc is a binary-to-text encoding scheme for transferring binary files in messages on Usenet or via e-mail.