Utagawa Toyokuni

ToyokuniToyokuni IUtagawa Toyokuni IToyokuni Utagawa
Utagawa Toyokuni (歌川豊国; 1769 in Edo – 24 February 1825 in Edo), also often referred to as Toyokuni I, to distinguish him from the members of his school who took over his gō (art-name) after he died, was a great master of ukiyo-e, known in particular for his kabuki actor prints.wikipedia
51 Related Articles

Utagawa school

Utagawamembers of his schoolUtagawa Kuniaki II
Utagawa Toyokuni (歌川豊国; 1769 in Edo – 24 February 1825 in Edo), also often referred to as Toyokuni I, to distinguish him from the members of his school who took over his gō (art-name) after he died, was a great master of ukiyo-e, known in particular for his kabuki actor prints.
His pupil, Toyokuni I, took over after Toyoharu's death and led the group to become the most famous and powerful woodblock print school for the remainder of the 19th century.

Ukiyo-e

Japanese printsJapanese woodblock printsUkiyoe
Utagawa Toyokuni (歌川豊国; 1769 in Edo – 24 February 1825 in Edo), also often referred to as Toyokuni I, to distinguish him from the members of his school who took over his gō (art-name) after he died, was a great master of ukiyo-e, known in particular for his kabuki actor prints.
A group of Utagawa-school offenders including Toyokuni had their works repressed in 1801, and Utamaro was imprisoned in 1804 for making prints of 16th-century political and military leader Toyotomi Hideyoshi.

Hiroshige

Andō HiroshigeUtagawa HiroshigeAndo Hiroshige
One of his fellow pupils under Toyoharu was Toyohiro, whose pupil was the great landscape artist Hiroshige.
He sought the tutelage of Toyokuni of the Utagawa school, but Toyokuni had too many pupils to make room for him.

Utamaro

Kitagawa Utamarofamed Japanese printmakerIchitarō Kitagawa
Toyokuni seems not to have been an "intuitive genius" determined to forge a new path; rather, he seems to have studied intently those who came before him, particularly Utamaro, Chōbunsai Eishi and Eishōsai Chōki.
A group of Utagawa-school offenders including Toyokuni had their works repressed in 1801.

Utagawa Toyoharu

Toyoharu
At around 14, Toyokuni was apprenticed to the first head of the Utagawa house, Utagawa Toyoharu, whom his father knew well and who lived nearby.
His students included Toyokuni and Toyohiro; Toyohiro worked in the style of his master, while Toyokuni, who headed the school from 1814, became a prominent and prolific producer of yakusha-e prints of kabuki actors.

Toyohiro

Utagawa Toyohiro
One of his fellow pupils under Toyoharu was Toyohiro, whose pupil was the great landscape artist Hiroshige.
His works include a number of ukiyo-e landscape series,as well as many depictions of the daily activities in the Yoshiwara entertainment quarter; many of his stylistic features paved the way for Hokusai and Hiroshige (the latter a Prodigy who studied under Toyohiro,becoming one of the very finest Landscape Artists of all ), as well as producing an important series of ukiyo-e triptychs in collaboration with Toyokuni, and numerous book and e-hon illustrations, which occupied him in his later years.

Utagawa Kuniyoshi

KuniyoshiKuniyoshi UtagawaIchiyūsai Kuniyoshi
Toyokuni's two major pupils were the woodblock print masters Kunisada and Kuniyoshi, but he had a host of students in his school.
Yoshisaburō proved his drawing talents at age 12, quickly attracting the attention of the famous ukiyo-e print master Utagawa Toyokuni.

Yakusha-e

actor prints
He was known mostly for his prints related to the kabuki theatre, in particular his yakusha-e actor portraits, a field which he took to new heights.
Meanwhile, Utagawa Toyokuni emerged almost simultaneously with Sharaku.

Ichikawa Omezō as a Pilgrim and Ichikawa Yaozō as a Samurai (Toyokuni I)

Ichikawa Omezō as a Pilgrim and Ichikawa Yaozō as a Samurai is an ukiyo-e woodblock print dating to around 1801 by Edo period artist Utagawa Toyokuni I.

Sharaku

Tōshūsai SharakuToshusai Sharaku
In his actor prints, like Sharaku, one sees the real subject; but his prints merely portrayed what he saw, unlike Sharaku who exaggerated those aspects he saw as the most key.
Others proposed identities include Sharaku's publisher Tsutaya or Tsutaya's father-in-law; the artists Utamaro, Utagawa Toyokuni, or Maruyama Ōkyo; the painter-poet Tani Bunchō; the writer ; an unnamed Dutch artist; or actually three people.

Kunisada

Utagawa KunisadaToyokuni IIIKunisada I
Toyokuni's two major pupils were the woodblock print masters Kunisada and Kuniyoshi, but he had a host of students in his school.
His early sketches at that time impressed Toyokuni, the great master of the Utagawa school and prominent designer of kabuki and actor-portrait prints.

Art name

pseudonymart-name
Utagawa Toyokuni (歌川豊国; 1769 in Edo – 24 February 1825 in Edo), also often referred to as Toyokuni I, to distinguish him from the members of his school who took over his gō (art-name) after he died, was a great master of ukiyo-e, known in particular for his kabuki actor prints.
Another figure who studied under Toyoharu was the principal head of the Utagawa school, Toyokuni.

Edo

YedoEdo CityEdo Honmachi
Utagawa Toyokuni (歌川豊国; 1769 in Edo – 24 February 1825 in Edo), also often referred to as Toyokuni I, to distinguish him from the members of his school who took over his gō (art-name) after he died, was a great master of ukiyo-e, known in particular for his kabuki actor prints.

Kabuki

Kabuki Theatrekabuki theateractor
Utagawa Toyokuni (歌川豊国; 1769 in Edo – 24 February 1825 in Edo), also often referred to as Toyokuni I, to distinguish him from the members of his school who took over his gō (art-name) after he died, was a great master of ukiyo-e, known in particular for his kabuki actor prints.

Eishōsai Chōki

Toyokuni seems not to have been an "intuitive genius" determined to forge a new path; rather, he seems to have studied intently those who came before him, particularly Utamaro, Chōbunsai Eishi and Eishōsai Chōki.

Musha-e

He also, however, produced other genres such as musha-e warrior prints, shunga erotica, and most notably bijin-ga.

Bijin-ga

bijingabijinbeauties
He also, however, produced other genres such as musha-e warrior prints, shunga erotica, and most notably bijin-ga.

Kanji

on'yomikun'yomikokuji
In addition, the name 'Toyokuni' has been transcribed through several kanji character combinations, both by the artist himself and by those writing about him.

Yoshitoshi

Tsukioka YoshitoshiYoshitoshi TsukiokaT. Yoshitoshi
Indeed, so powerful was the Utagawa school after Toyokuni's time that almost every Japanese print artist of note either had one of these two characters in his gō, or, like Yoshitoshi, was a student of one who did.

Toyoshige

His gō, "Toyokuni", was initially used after his death by his son-in-law, Toyoshige, who is therefore known to us as Toyokuni II.