Vaccine

vaccinesvaccinologyvaccinatedvaccinationvaccinatevaccinationsvaccinologistrecombinant vaccinetherapeutic vaccinedelivery system
A vaccine is a biological preparation that provides active acquired immunity to a particular disease.wikipedia
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Cancer vaccine

cancer vaccinescancer vaccine-based immunotherapyHepcortespenlisimut-L
Vaccines can be prophylactic (to prevent or ameliorate the effects of a future infection by a natural or "wild" pathogen), or therapeutic (e.g., vaccines against cancer, which are being investigated).
A cancer vaccine is a vaccine that either treats existing cancer or prevents development of a cancer.

HPV vaccine

HPV vaccinationHPV vaccinesHuman papillomavirus vaccine
Human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccines are vaccines that prevent infection by certain types of human papillomavirus.

Vaccine-preventable diseases

vaccine-preventable diseasevaccine-preventabledisease
A vaccine-preventable disease is an infectious disease for which an effective preventive vaccine exists.

Breakthrough infection

If a vaccinated individual does develop the disease vaccinated against (breakthrough infection), the disease is likely to be less virulent than in unvaccinated victims.
Simply, they occur when vaccines fail to provide immunity against the pathogen they are designed to target.

Immunologic adjuvant

adjuvantadjuvantsvaccine adjuvant
Adjuvants in immunology are often used to modify or augment the effects of a vaccine by stimulating the immune system to respond to the vaccine more vigorously, and thus providing increased immunity to a particular disease.

Eradication of infectious diseases

eradicationeradicatedisease eradication programme
It became the first disease for which there was an effective vaccine in 1798 when Edward Jenner showed the protective effect of inoculation (vaccination) of humans with material from cowpox lesions.

Therapy

therapeutictherapisttreatment
Vaccines can be prophylactic (to prevent or ameliorate the effects of a future infection by a natural or "wild" pathogen), or therapeutic (e.g., vaccines against cancer, which are being investigated).

MMR vaccine

MMRmeasles-mumps-rubella vaccineMMR vaccination
MMR vaccine is rarely associated with febrile seizures.
The MMR vaccine is a vaccine against measles, mumps, and rubella (German measles).

Vaccine efficacy

efficacyeffectivenessvaccine assays
Vaccine efficacy was designed and calculated by Greenwood and Yule in 1915 for the cholera and typhoid vaccines.

Vaccination schedule

vaccine scheduleroutine immunizationsroutine vaccinations
A vaccine is an antigenic preparation used to produce active immunity to a disease, in order to prevent or reduce the effects of infection by any natural or "wild" pathogen.

Varicella vaccine

chickenpox vaccinevaricellaVarivax
Varicella vaccine is rarely associated with complications in immunodeficient individuals and rotavirus vaccines are moderately associated with intussusception.
Varicella vaccine, also known as chickenpox vaccine, is a vaccine that protects against chickenpox.

Rotavirus vaccine

RotaTeqrotavirusrotavirus vaccination
Varicella vaccine is rarely associated with complications in immunodeficient individuals and rotavirus vaccines are moderately associated with intussusception.
Rotavirus vaccine is a vaccine used to protect against rotavirus infections, which are the leading cause of severe diarrhea among young children.

Polio vaccine

oral polio vaccineSalk vaccinepolio vaccination
Examples include the polio vaccine, hepatitis A vaccine, rabies vaccine and some influenza vaccines.
Polio vaccines are vaccines used to prevent poliomyelitis (polio).

Polio eradication

Poliomyelitis eradicationEradication of polioeradicate polio
Polio, which is transmitted only between humans, is targeted by an extensive eradication campaign that has seen endemic polio restricted to only parts of three countries (Afghanistan, Nigeria, and Pakistan).
Three indicators, however, are considered of primary importance in determining the likelihood of successful eradication: that effective interventional tools are available to interrupt transmission of the agent, such as a vaccine; that diagnostic tools, with sufficient sensitivity and specificity, be available to detect infections that can lead to transmission of the disease; and that humans are required for the life-cycle of the agent, which has no other vertebrate reservoir and cannot amplify in the environment.

Influenza vaccine

flu vaccineinfluenza vaccinationinfluenza
Examples include the polio vaccine, hepatitis A vaccine, rabies vaccine and some influenza vaccines.
Influenza vaccines, also known as flu shots or flu jabs, are vaccines that protect against infection by influenza viruses.

Hepatitis A vaccine

Hepatitis AHavrixAvaxim
Examples include the polio vaccine, hepatitis A vaccine, rabies vaccine and some influenza vaccines.
Hepatitis A vaccine is a vaccine that prevents hepatitis A.

Rabies vaccine

vaccinationRabiesrabies vaccination
Examples include the polio vaccine, hepatitis A vaccine, rabies vaccine and some influenza vaccines.
Rabies vaccine is a vaccine used to prevent rabies.

Attenuated vaccine

attenuatedlive vaccinelive attenuated
Some vaccines contain live, attenuated microorganisms.
An attenuated vaccine is a vaccine created by reducing the virulence of a pathogen, but still keeping it viable (or "live").

National Childhood Vaccine Injury Act

National Childhood Vaccine Injury Act of 1986
The United States has the National Childhood Vaccine Injury Act.
NCVIA's purpose was to eliminate the potential financial liability of vaccine manufacturers due to vaccine injury claims in order to ensure a stable market supply of vaccines, and to provide cost-effective arbitration for vaccine injury claims.

Antigen

antigensantigenicantigenic proteins
It also might fail for genetic reasons if the host's immune system includes no strains of B cells that can generate antibodies suited to reacting effectively and binding to the antigens associated with the pathogen.
Vaccines are examples of antigens in an immunogenic form, which are intentionally administered to a recipient to induce the memory function of adaptive immune system toward the antigens of the pathogen invading that recipient.

Louis Pasteur

PasteurPasteur, LouisPasteurian
In 1881, to honor Jenner, Louis Pasteur proposed that the terms should be extended to cover the new protective inoculations then being developed.
This discovery revolutionized work in infectious diseases, and Pasteur gave these artificially weakened diseases the generic name of "vaccines", in honour of Jenner's discovery.

Measles

Rubeolameasles encephalitisAcute Measles encephalitis
Examples include the viral diseases yellow fever, measles, mumps, and rubella, and the bacterial disease typhoid.
In developing countries where measles is common, the World Health Organization (WHO) recommends two doses of vaccine be given, at six and nine months of age.

Edible algae vaccine

Examples include the subunit vaccine against Hepatitis B virus that is composed of only the surface proteins of the virus (previously extracted from the blood serum of chronically infected patients, but now produced by recombination of the viral genes into yeast) or as an edible algae vaccine, the virus-like particle (VLP) vaccine against human papillomavirus (HPV) that is composed of the viral major capsid protein, and the hemagglutinin and neuraminidase subunits of the influenza virus.
Edible algae based vaccination is a vaccination strategy under preliminary research to combine a genetically engineered sub-unit vaccine and an immunologic adjuvant into Chlamydomonas reinhardtii microalgae.

Febrile seizure

febrile seizuresFebrile convulsionsfebrile
MMR vaccine is rarely associated with febrile seizures.
There is a small chance of a febrile seizure after certain vaccines.

RVSV-ZEBOV vaccine

VSV-EBOVrVSV-ZEBOVrVSV-ZEBOV-GP
Recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus–Zaire Ebola virus (rVSV-ZEBOV, also designated V920 ) is an experimental vaccine for protection against Ebola virus disease.