A report on Vagus nerve

Plan of the upper portions of the glossopharyngeal, vagus, and accessory nerves.
H&E stained fibers of the vagus nerve (bottom right) innervate the sinoatrial node tissue (middle left)
Inferior view of the human brain, with the cranial nerves labeled.
Section of the neck at about the level of the sixth cervical vertebra
Transverse section of thorax, showing relations of pulmonary artery
The arch of the aorta, and its branches
Dura mater and its processes exposed by removing part of the right half of the skull, and the brain
The tracheobronchial lymph glands
Section of the medulla oblongata at about the middle of the olive
Hind- and mid-brains; postero-lateral view
Upper part of medulla spinalis and hind- and mid-brains; posterior aspect, exposed in situ
The right sympathetic chain and its connections with the thoracic, abdominal, and pelvic plexuses
The celiac ganglia with the sympathetic plexuses of the abdominal viscera radiating from the ganglia
The position and relation of the esophagus in the cervical region and in the posterior mediastinum, seen from behind
The thyroid gland and its relations
The thymus of a full-term fetus, exposed in situ
Deep dissection of vagus nerve
Vagus nerve – dissection

Cranial nerve that interfaces with the parasympathetic control of the heart, lungs, and digestive tract.

- Vagus nerve
Plan of the upper portions of the glossopharyngeal, vagus, and accessory nerves.

56 related topics with Alpha

Overall

The common carotid artery arises directly from the aorta on the left and as a branch of the brachiocephalic trunk on the right.

Common carotid artery

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In anatomy, the left and right common carotid arteries (carotids) are arteries that supply the head and neck with oxygenated blood; they divide in the neck to form the external and internal carotid arteries.

In anatomy, the left and right common carotid arteries (carotids) are arteries that supply the head and neck with oxygenated blood; they divide in the neck to form the external and internal carotid arteries.

The common carotid artery arises directly from the aorta on the left and as a branch of the brachiocephalic trunk on the right.
Arteries of the neck. The right common carotid artery – labeled Common caroti in the figure – divides into the right internal carotid artery and external carotid artery.
Superficial dissection of the right side of the neck, showing the carotid and subclavian arteries
Magnetic Resonance Angiography
Normal carotidal arteriography
Common carotid artery
Common carotid artery – right view
Brachial plexus and common carotid artery
Common carotid artery
Common carotid artery
Right and left common carotid arteries

To its right side below is the brachiocephalic trunk, and above, the trachea, the inferior thyroid veins, and the remains of the thymus; to its left side are the left vagus and phrenic nerves, left pleura, and lung.

Plan of upper portions of glossopharyngeal, vagus, and accessory nerves. ("Laryngeal" labeled at lower right.)

Superior laryngeal nerve

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Plan of upper portions of glossopharyngeal, vagus, and accessory nerves. ("Laryngeal" labeled at lower right.)
The position and relation of the esophagus in the cervical region and in the posterior mediastinum. Seen from behind.

The superior laryngeal nerve is a branch of the vagus nerve.

Human neck

Neck

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Part of the body on many vertebrates that connects the head with the torso.

Part of the body on many vertebrates that connects the head with the torso.

Human neck
Muscles in the human neck
Clear view of Adam's apple in profile.
Development of neck lines (lat.monillas) or "moon rings" due to excess fat.
The long neck is a distinguishing feature of the giraffe.

Vascular compartment is paired and consists of the two carotid sheaths found on each side of the trachea. Each carotid sheath contains the vagus nerve, common carotid artery and internal jugular vein.

Autonomic nervous system innervation.

Autonomic nervous system

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Division of the peripheral nervous system that supplies smooth muscle and glands, and thus influences the function of internal organs.

Division of the peripheral nervous system that supplies smooth muscle and glands, and thus influences the function of internal organs.

Autonomic nervous system innervation.
Autonomic nervous system, showing splanchnic nerves in middle, and the vagus nerve as "X" in blue. The heart and organs below in list to right are regarded as viscera.
Function of the autonomic nervous system
A flow diagram showing the process of stimulation of adrenal medulla that makes it release adrenaline, that further acts on adrenoreceptors, indirectly mediating or mimicking sympathetic activity.

The parasympathetic division has craniosacral “outflow”, meaning that the neurons begin at the cranial nerves (specifically the oculomotor nerve, facial nerve, glossopharyngeal nerve and vagus nerve) and sacral (S2-S4) spinal cord.

The human heart

Heart rate

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Speed of the heartbeat measured by the number of contractions (beats) of the heart per minute (bpm).

Speed of the heartbeat measured by the number of contractions (beats) of the heart per minute (bpm).

The human heart
Autonomic Innervation of the Heart – Cardioaccelerator and cardioinhibitory areas are components of the paired cardiac centers located in the medulla oblongata of the brain. They innervate the heart via sympathetic cardiac nerves that increase cardiac activity and vagus (parasympathetic) nerves that slow cardiac activity.
Effects of Parasympathetic and Sympathetic Stimulation on Normal Sinus Rhythm – The wave of depolarization in a normal sinus rhythm shows a stable resting HR. Following parasympathetic stimulation, HR slows. Following sympathetic stimulation, HR increases.
Heart rate (HR) (top trace) and tidal volume (Vt) (lung volume, second trace) plotted on the same chart, showing how heart rate increases with inspiration and decreases with expiration.
The various formulae provide slightly different numbers for the maximum heart rates by age.
Fox and Haskell formula; widely used.
At 21 days after conception, the human heart begins beating at 70 to 80 beats per minute and accelerates linearly for the first month of beating.
Wrist heart rate monitor
Heart rate monitor with a wrist receiver
ECG-RRinterval
In obstetrics, heart rate can be measured by ultrasonography, such as in this embryo (at bottom left in the sac) of 6 weeks with a heart rate of approximately 90 per minute.
Pulsatile retinal blood flow in the optic nerve head region revealed by laser Doppler imaging

The accelerans nerve provides sympathetic input to the heart by releasing norepinephrine onto the cells of the sinoatrial node (SA node), and the vagus nerve provides parasympathetic input to the heart by releasing acetylcholine onto sinoatrial node cells.

Section of the neck at about the level of the sixth cervical vertebra. Showing the arrangement of the fascia coli. Carotid sheath is labeled in red.

Carotid sheath

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Anatomical term for the fibrous connective tissue that surrounds the vascular compartment of the neck.

Anatomical term for the fibrous connective tissue that surrounds the vascular compartment of the neck.

Section of the neck at about the level of the sixth cervical vertebra. Showing the arrangement of the fascia coli. Carotid sheath is labeled in red.
Hypoglossal nerve, cervical plexus, and their branches.
Muscles of the pharynx, viewed from behind, together with the associated vessels and nerves.

the vagus nerve.

Schematic of the proximal aorta and its branches. The left subclavian artery is the fifth branch of the aorta and the third branch from the arch of the aorta. The right subclavian artery arises from the brachiocephalic artery and its branches. (Right subclavian is at upper left, and left subclavian is at upper right.)

Subclavian artery

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In human anatomy, the subclavian arteries are paired major arteries of the upper thorax, below the clavicle.

In human anatomy, the subclavian arteries are paired major arteries of the upper thorax, below the clavicle.

Schematic of the proximal aorta and its branches. The left subclavian artery is the fifth branch of the aorta and the third branch from the arch of the aorta. The right subclavian artery arises from the brachiocephalic artery and its branches. (Right subclavian is at upper left, and left subclavian is at upper right.)
Superficial dissection of the right side of the neck, showing the carotid and subclavian arteries. Branch of vertebral artery and thyrocervical trunk is labeled. Internal thoracic artery branches from same segment, but inferiorily, and is therefore not visible.
Side of neck, showing chief surface markings.
Magnetic Resonance Angiography
Right subclavian artery
Brachial plexus and subclavian artery

It is crossed by the internal jugular vein and the vertebral vein, by the vagus nerve and the cardiac branches of the vagus and sympathetic, and by the subclavian loop of the sympathetic trunk which forms a ring around the vessel.

The tracheobronchial lymph glands. (Esophageal plexus visible at bottom center.)

Esophageal plexus

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The tracheobronchial lymph glands. (Esophageal plexus visible at bottom center.)
The right sympathetic chain and its connections with the thoracic, abdominal, and pelvic plexuses.

The esophageal plexus (oesophageal plexus in British-English) is formed by nerve fibers from two sources, branches of the vagus nerve, and visceral branches of the sympathetic trunk.

Transverse section of medulla oblongata below the middle of the olive. ("Nucleus ambiguus" labeled at center right.)

Nucleus ambiguus

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Group of large motor neurons, situated deep in the medullary reticular formation named by Jacob Clarke.

Group of large motor neurons, situated deep in the medullary reticular formation named by Jacob Clarke.

Transverse section of medulla oblongata below the middle of the olive. ("Nucleus ambiguus" labeled at center right.)
Section of the medulla oblongata at about the middle of the olive.
The cranial nerve nuclei schematically represented; dorsal view. Motor nuclei in red; sensory in blue.
Nuclei of origin of cranial motor nerves schematically represented; lateral view.
The formatio reticularis of the medulla oblongata, shown by a transverse section passing through the middle of the olive.

This nucleus gives rise to the branchial efferent motor fibers of the vagus nerve (CN X) terminating in the laryngeal, pharyngeal muscles, and musculus uvulae; as well as to the efferent motor fibers of the glossopharyngeal nerve (CN IX) terminating in the stylopharyngeus muscle.

Nuclei of origin of cranial motor nerves schematically represented; lateral view. ("X" visible at bottom center.)

Dorsal nucleus of vagus nerve

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Nuclei of origin of cranial motor nerves schematically represented; lateral view. ("X" visible at bottom center.)
Section of the medulla oblongata at about the middle of the olive.
The cranial nerve nuclei schematically represented; dorsal view. Motor nuclei in red; sensory in blue.
Dorsal motor nucleus of Vagus with Lewy body pathology

The dorsal nucleus of vagus nerve (or posterior nucleus of vagus nerve or dorsal vagal nucleus or nucleus dorsalis nervi vagi or nucleus posterior nervi vagi) is a cranial nerve nucleus for the vagus nerve in the medulla that lies ventral to the floor of the fourth ventricle.