A report on Vagus nerve

Plan of the upper portions of the glossopharyngeal, vagus, and accessory nerves.
H&E stained fibers of the vagus nerve (bottom right) innervate the sinoatrial node tissue (middle left)
Inferior view of the human brain, with the cranial nerves labeled.
Section of the neck at about the level of the sixth cervical vertebra
Transverse section of thorax, showing relations of pulmonary artery
The arch of the aorta, and its branches
Dura mater and its processes exposed by removing part of the right half of the skull, and the brain
The tracheobronchial lymph glands
Section of the medulla oblongata at about the middle of the olive
Hind- and mid-brains; postero-lateral view
Upper part of medulla spinalis and hind- and mid-brains; posterior aspect, exposed in situ
The right sympathetic chain and its connections with the thoracic, abdominal, and pelvic plexuses
The celiac ganglia with the sympathetic plexuses of the abdominal viscera radiating from the ganglia
The position and relation of the esophagus in the cervical region and in the posterior mediastinum, seen from behind
The thyroid gland and its relations
The thymus of a full-term fetus, exposed in situ
Deep dissection of vagus nerve
Vagus nerve – dissection

Cranial nerve that interfaces with the parasympathetic control of the heart, lungs, and digestive tract.

- Vagus nerve
Plan of the upper portions of the glossopharyngeal, vagus, and accessory nerves.

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Overall

Superior view of the skull base. posterior cranial fossa shown in green. 
1: Dorsum sellae of the sphenoid bone 
2: Superior borders of the petrous part of the temporal bone 
3: Groove for transverse sinus of the occipital bone

Posterior cranial fossa

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Part of the cranial cavity, located between the foramen magnum and tentorium cerebelli.

Part of the cranial cavity, located between the foramen magnum and tentorium cerebelli.

Superior view of the skull base. posterior cranial fossa shown in green. 
1: Dorsum sellae of the sphenoid bone 
2: Superior borders of the petrous part of the temporal bone 
3: Groove for transverse sinus of the occipital bone
Animation
Posterior cranial fossa at human fetus
Base of skull
Posterior cranial fossa
Posterior cranial fossa
A tumor of the posterior fossa leading to mass effect and shift of the fourth ventricle

Lies between the inferior edge of the petrous temporal bone and the adjacent occipital bone and transmits the internal jugular vein (actually begins here), the glossopharyngeal (IX), the vagus (X) and the accessory (XI) nerves.

Electrical stimulation of vagus nerve.

Vagus nerve stimulation

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Electrical stimulation of vagus nerve.

Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) is a medical treatment that involves delivering electrical impulses to the vagus nerve.

Dissection of the muscles of the palate from behind.

Salpingopharyngeus muscle

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Muscle of the pharynx.

Muscle of the pharynx.

Dissection of the muscles of the palate from behind.

The salpingopharyngeus is supplied by the vagus nerve (CN X) via the pharyngeal plexus.

A parietal cell.

Parietal cell

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Parietal cells (also known as oxyntic cells) are epithelial cells in the stomach that secrete hydrochloric acid (HCl) and intrinsic factor.

Parietal cells (also known as oxyntic cells) are epithelial cells in the stomach that secrete hydrochloric acid (HCl) and intrinsic factor.

A parietal cell.
A parietal cell.
Human parietal cells (pink staining) – stomach.
Immunofluorescence staining pattern of gastric parietal antibodies on a stomach section
Parietal cells are part of fundic gland polyps (here shown in high magnification).

Acetylcholine, from parasympathetic activity via the vagus nerve and enteric nervous system, stimulating M3 receptors.

Pharyngeal reflex

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Reflex muscular contraction of the back of the throat, evoked by touching the roof of the mouth, the back of the tongue, the area around the tonsils, the uvula, and the back of the throat.

Reflex muscular contraction of the back of the throat, evoked by touching the roof of the mouth, the back of the tongue, the area around the tonsils, the uvula, and the back of the throat.

In certain cases, absence of the gag reflex and pharyngeal sensation can be a symptom of a number of severe medical conditions, such as damage to the glossopharyngeal nerve, the vagus nerve, or brain death.

Dissection of the muscles of the palate from behind. (Caption for Levator veli palatini visible at right, second from the top.)

Levator veli palatini

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Elevator muscle of the soft palate in the human body.

Elevator muscle of the soft palate in the human body.

Dissection of the muscles of the palate from behind. (Caption for Levator veli palatini visible at right, second from the top.)
Left temporal bone. Inferior surface.

The levator veli palatini muscle is supplied by the pharyngeal plexus, which is supplied by the vagus nerve (CN X).