Vaishnavism

VaishnavaVaishnaviteVaishnavaiteVaishnavVaishnavasVaishnavitesKrishnaismVaisnavismVaisnavaKrishnology
Vaishnavism is one of the major Hindu denominations along with Shaivism, Shaktism, and Smartism.wikipedia
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Bhagavata Purana

Srimad BhagavatamBhagavataBhagavatam
Key texts in Vaishnavism include the Vedas, the Upanishads, the Bhagavad Gita, the Pancaratra (Agama) texts and the Bhagavata Purana.
Originally composed in Sanskrit, the most studied, popular, revered, and influential Purana is an epic Vaishnava poem consisting of 18,000 shlokas (or verses) over 12 skandhas (or cantos).

Krishna

Lord KrishnaSri KrishnaShri Krishna
Rama, Krishna, Narayana, Kalki, Hari, Vithoba, Kesava, Madhava, Govinda, Srinathji and Jagannath are among the popular names used for the same supreme being.
In some sub-traditions, Krishna is worshipped as Svayam Bhagavan, and this is sometimes referred to as Krishnaism.

Jagannath

JagannathaLord JagannathLord Jagannatha
Rama, Krishna, Narayana, Kalki, Hari, Vithoba, Kesava, Madhava, Govinda, Srinathji and Jagannath are among the popular names used for the same supreme being.
To most Vaishnava Hindus, Jagannath is an abstract representation of Krishna; to some Shaiva and Shakta Hindus, He is a symmetry-filled tantric representation of Bhairava; to some Buddhists, He is a symbolic representation of the Buddha in the Buddha-Sangha-Dhamma triad; to some Jains, His name and His festive rituals are derived from Jeenanath of Jainism tradition.

Bhakti movement

bhaktiBhakti ageBhakti era
The tradition is known for the loving devotion to an avatar of Vishnu (often Krishna), and it has been key to the spread of the Bhakti movement in South Asia in the 2nd millennium CE.
The Bhakti movement regionally developed around different gods and goddesses, and some sub-sects were Vaishnavism (Vishnu), Shaivism (Shiva), Shaktism (Shakti goddesses), and Smartism.

Kalki

Kalki AvatarKalankiKalki Krishnamurthy
Rama, Krishna, Narayana, Kalki, Hari, Vithoba, Kesava, Madhava, Govinda, Srinathji and Jagannath are among the popular names used for the same supreme being.
Kalki, also called Kalkin or Karki, is the tenth avatar of Hindu god Vishnu to end the Kali Yuga, one of the four periods in the endless cycle of existence (krita) in Vaishnavism cosmology.

Narayana

NarayanLord NarayanaNārāyaṇa
Rama, Krishna, Narayana, Kalki, Hari, Vithoba, Kesava, Madhava, Govinda, Srinathji and Jagannath are among the popular names used for the same supreme being.
He is also known as the "Purusha" and is considered Supreme being in Vaishnavism.

Ramananda

RamanandBhagat RamanandRamanandi
Later developments led by Ramananda created a Rama-oriented movement, now the largest monastic group in Asia. Bhakti poets or teachers such as Manavala Mamunigal, Namdev, Ramananda, Surdas, Tulsidas, Eknath, Tyagaraja, Chaitanya Mahaprabhu and many others influenced the expansion of Vaishnavism.Even Meera bai(princess of Mehwar and Rajasthan)took part in this specific movement. In North and Eastern India, Krishnaism gave rise to various late Medieval movements: Nimbarka and Ramananda in the 14th century, Sankaradeva in the 15th and Vallabha and Chaitanya in the 16th century.
Ramananda (IAST: Rāmānanda) was a 14th-century Vaishnava devotional poet saint, in the Ganges river region of northern India.

Bala Krishna

BalakrishnaBalakrishnanBal Krishna
Vaishnavism originates in the latest centuries BCE and the early centuries CE, as an amalgam of the heroic Krishna Vasudeva, the "divine child" Bala Krishna of the Gopala traditions, and syncretism of these non-Vedic traditions with the Mahabharata canon, thus affiliating itself with Vedism in order to become acceptable to the orthodox establishment.
Bala Krishna (बाल-कृष्ण, literally "child Krishna") sometimes translated to "Divine Child Krishna", is historically one of the early forms of worship in Krishnaism and an element of the history of Krishna worship in antiquity.

Historical Vishnuism

Rigvedic Vishnu
The "Greater Krsnaism", states Dandekar, then merged with the Rigvedic Vishnu.
Historical Vishnuism as early worship of the deity Vishnu is one of the historical components, branches or origins of the contemporary and early Vaishnavism, which was subject of considerable study, and often showing that Vishnuism is a distinctive worship — a sect.

Krishna Vasudeva

Krishna-VasudevaVasudeva-KrishnaCult of Krishna-Vasudeva
Vaishnavism originates in the latest centuries BCE and the early centuries CE, as an amalgam of the heroic Krishna Vasudeva, the "divine child" Bala Krishna of the Gopala traditions, and syncretism of these non-Vedic traditions with the Mahabharata canon, thus affiliating itself with Vedism in order to become acceptable to the orthodox establishment.
The cult of Krishna Vāsudeva (IAST "Krishna, son of Vasudeva") is historically one of the earliest forms of worship in Krishnaism and Vaishnavism.

Vithoba

VitthalPandurangaVitthala
Rama, Krishna, Narayana, Kalki, Hari, Vithoba, Kesava, Madhava, Govinda, Srinathji and Jagannath are among the popular names used for the same supreme being.
Finally, Vithoba is also addressed by the names of Vishnu like Hari and Narayana, in the Vaishnava sect.

Avatar

avatarsincarnationavatara
The tradition is notable for its avatar doctrine, wherein Vishnu is revered in one of many distinct incarnations.
The avatars of Vishnu are important in Vaishnavism theology.

Alvars

AzhwarAlwarsAzhwars
Hardy argues that the Sanskrit Bhagavata Purana is essentially a Sanskrit "translation" of the bhakti of the Tamil alvars.
They are venerated especially in Vaishnavism, which regards Vishnu or Krishna as the Supreme Being.

Tulsidas

Goswami TulsidasTulasidasGosvāmī Tulsīdās
Bhakti poets or teachers such as Manavala Mamunigal, Namdev, Ramananda, Surdas, Tulsidas, Eknath, Tyagaraja, Chaitanya Mahaprabhu and many others influenced the expansion of Vaishnavism.Even Meera bai(princess of Mehwar and Rajasthan)took part in this specific movement.
Tulsidas (1532 –1623), also known as Goswami Tulsidas, was a Hindu Vaishnava saint and poet, renowned for his devotion to the deity Rama.

Madhvacharya

MadhvaMadhwacharyaMadhwa
The Vaishnava tradition has many sampradayas (denominations, sub-schools) ranging from the medieval era Dvaita school of Madhvacharya to Vishishtadvaita school of Ramanuja.
The Dvaita school founded by Madhva influenced Vaishnavism, the Bhakti movement in medieval India, and has been one of the three influential Vedānta philosophies, along with Advaita Vedanta and Vishishtadvaita Vedanta.

Bhakti yoga

bhaktiBhakti-yogabhakti marga
Krishnaism becomes associated with bhakti yoga in the medieval period.
Bhakti marga is a part of the religious practice in Vaishnavism, Shaivism, and Shaktism.

Gopal (Krishna)

GopalaGopalVenugopala
Vaishnavism originates in the latest centuries BCE and the early centuries CE, as an amalgam of the heroic Krishna Vasudeva, the "divine child" Bala Krishna of the Gopala traditions, and syncretism of these non-Vedic traditions with the Mahabharata canon, thus affiliating itself with Vedism in order to become acceptable to the orthodox establishment.
Historically one of the earliest forms of worship in Krishnaism or Vaishnava dharma, it is believed to be a key element of the early history of the worship of Krishna.

Chaitanya Mahaprabhu

ChaitanyaCaitanya MahaprabhuSri Chaitanya
In North and Eastern India, Krishnaism gave rise to various late Medieval movements: Nimbarka and Ramananda in the 14th century, Sankaradeva in the 15th and Vallabha and Chaitanya in the 16th century.
He also expounded the Vaishnava school of Bhakti yoga (meaning loving devotion to God), based on Bhagavata Purana and Bhagavad Gita.

Hari

HareHáriSri Hari
Rama, Krishna, Narayana, Kalki, Hari, Vithoba, Kesava, Madhava, Govinda, Srinathji and Jagannath are among the popular names used for the same supreme being.
The name "Hari" also appears as the 656th name of Vishnu in the Vishnu sahasranama of the Mahabharata and is considered to be of great significance in Vaishnavism.

Namdev

Bhagat NamdevNamadevaNamdeo
Bhakti poets or teachers such as Manavala Mamunigal, Namdev, Ramananda, Surdas, Tulsidas, Eknath, Tyagaraja, Chaitanya Mahaprabhu and many others influenced the expansion of Vaishnavism.Even Meera bai(princess of Mehwar and Rajasthan)took part in this specific movement.
Namdev was influenced by Vaishnavism, and became widely known in India for his devotional songs set to music (bhajan-kirtans).

Radha-vallabha

RadhaismRadhavallabh SampradayaRadhavallabha
This is its difference from such groups as Ramaism, Radhaism, Sitaism, etc. As such Krishnaism is believed to be one of the early attempts to make philosophical Hinduism appealing to the masses.
Radhavallabha is a Vaishnava denomination which began with the Vaishnava theologian Hith Harivansh Mahaprabhu.

Friedhelm Hardy

Hardy
According to Hardy, there is evidence of early "southern Krishnaism," despite the tendency to allocate the Krishna-traditions to the Northern traditions.
Hardy went to Tamil Nadu to conduct research for his doctoral thesis, spending over a year examining the history of Krishnaism, specifically all pre-11th century sources starting with the stories of Krishna and the gopis, of Northern Literature, and including Mayon mysticism of the Vaishnava Tamil saints, Sangam Tamil literature and Alvars' Krishna-centered devotion in the rasa of the emotional union and the dating and history of the Bhagavata Purana.

Bhagavata

BhagavatBhagavatasBhagavata religion
Most of the Gupta kings, beginning with Chandragupta II (Vikramaditya) (375-413 CE) were known as Parama Bhagavatas or Bhagavata Vaishnavas.
However, Vaishnava traditionalists place it in the 4th century BC.

Pushtimarg

PushtiMahaprabhu Shri Vallabhacharya ji's writingsPushti Marg (The way of grace) or the Vallabh Sampradaya
In the Krishnaism group of independent traditions of Vaishnavism, such as the Nimbarka Sampradaya (the first krishnaite sampradaya developed by Nimbarka c. 12th or 13th century), Ekasarana Dharma, Gaudiya Vaishnavism, Mahanubhava, Rudra Sampradaya (Pushtimarg), Vaishnava-Sahajiya and Varkari, devotees worship Krishna as the One Supreme form of God, and source of all avatars, Svayam Bhagavan.
Pushtimarg (lit. "the Path of Nourishing, Flourishing"), also known as Pushtimarg sampradaya or Vallabha sampradaya, is a subtradition of Vaishnavism (Hinduism).

Vaishnava-Sahajiya

sahajiaSahajiyasahajiyas
In the Krishnaism group of independent traditions of Vaishnavism, such as the Nimbarka Sampradaya (the first krishnaite sampradaya developed by Nimbarka c. 12th or 13th century), Ekasarana Dharma, Gaudiya Vaishnavism, Mahanubhava, Rudra Sampradaya (Pushtimarg), Vaishnava-Sahajiya and Varkari, devotees worship Krishna as the One Supreme form of God, and source of all avatars, Svayam Bhagavan.
Vaishnava-Sahajiya is a form of tantric Vaishnavism that centred in Bengal, India.