Vajont Dam

Vajont dam disasterVajont disaster1963 Vajont Dam Collapse1963 Vajont Dam megatsunamiOctober 9, 1963Vaiont DamVajontVajont dam disaster.
The Vajont Dam (or Vaiont Dam) is a disused dam, completed in 1959 in the valley of the Vajont River under Monte Toc, in the municipality of Erto and Casso, 100 km (60 miles) north of Venice, Italy.wikipedia
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List of tallest dams

List of tallest dams in the worldList of world's tallest damstallest dam
One of the tallest dams in the world, it is 262 m high, 27 m wide and 22.11 m thick at the base and 191 m wide and 3.4 m thick at the top.

Megatsunami

mega-tsunamimegatsunamislandslide tsunami
On 9 October 1963, during initial filling, a massive landslide caused a man-made megatsunami in the lake in which 50 million cubic metres of water overtopped the dam in a wave of 250 metres, leading to the complete destruction of several villages and towns, and 1,917 deaths.
Modern megatsunamis include the one associated with the 1883 eruption of Krakatoa (volcanic eruption), the 1958 Lituya Bay megatsunami (landslide into a bay), and the wave resulting from the Vajont Dam landslide (caused by human activity destabilizing sides of valley).

Enel

Enel GroupEnel S.p.A.1962 nationalization of the electrical power sector
In 1962 the dam was nationalized and came under the control of ENEL as part of the Italian Ministry for Public Works.
In 1963, Enel was involved in the Vajont Dam disaster.

Monte Toc

Toc
The Vajont Dam (or Vaiont Dam) is a disused dam, completed in 1959 in the valley of the Vajont River under Monte Toc, in the municipality of Erto and Casso, 100 km (60 miles) north of Venice, Italy.
Monte Toc, nicknamed the walking mountain by locals due to its tendency to landslide, is a mountain on the border between Veneto and Friuli-Venezia Giulia in Northern Italy best known for the Vajont Dam, which was built at the mountain's base in 1960.

Italy

ItalianITAItalia
The Vajont Dam (or Vaiont Dam) is a disused dam, completed in 1959 in the valley of the Vajont River under Monte Toc, in the municipality of Erto and Casso, 100 km (60 miles) north of Venice, Italy.
Deforestation, illegal building developments and poor land-management policies have led to significant erosion all over Italy's mountainous regions, leading to major ecological disasters like the 1963 Vajont Dam flood, the 1998 Sarno and 2009 Messina mudslides.

Erto e Casso

ErtoErto and Casso
The Vajont Dam (or Vaiont Dam) is a disused dam, completed in 1959 in the valley of the Vajont River under Monte Toc, in the municipality of Erto and Casso, 100 km (60 miles) north of Venice, Italy. Villages in the territory of Erto e Casso and the village of, near Castellavazzo, were largely wrecked. In April and May 1962, with the basin water level at 215 m, the people of Erto and Casso reported five "grade five" Mercalli intensity scale earthquakes.
Erto and Casso were the two villages in the Vajont valley, above the artificial lake, before the Vajont Dam disaster on 9 October 1963.

Castellavazzo

Villages in the territory of Erto e Casso and the village of, near Castellavazzo, were largely wrecked.
On 9 October 1963 at 10:35 pm, heavy rainfall and the 3rd drawing of the Vajont Dam triggered a landslide.

Longarone

The flooding from the huge wave in the Piave valley destroyed the villages of Longarone, Pirago, Rivalta, Villanova and Faè, killing around 2,000 people and turning the land below the dam into a flat plain of mud with an impact crater 60 m deep and 80 m wide.
The village was destroyed in the Vajont Dam disaster on October 9, 1963, when a landslide from Monte Toc forced 50 million cubic metres (1,800 million cu ft) of water over the top of the Vajont Dam.

Casso

cassō
In April and May 1962, with the basin water level at 215 m, the people of Erto and Casso reported five "grade five" Mercalli intensity scale earthquakes.
Situated upon the Vajont Dam, Casso was one of the villages involved in the disaster of October 9, 1963.

Vajont

Most of the survivors were moved into a newly built village, Vajont, 50 km (31 mi) south-east on the Tagliamento river plain.
It was built to rehome the people evacuated from Erto e Casso after the Vajont Dam disaster of 1963.

Marco Paolini

Paolini
Interest was rejuvenated by a 1997 television program by Marco Paolini and, "Il racconto del Vajont".
In 1995, received the Ubu Prize for writing Il racconto del Vajont (translated: The Vajont Tale), which was dedicated to the disaster of the Vajont Dam in Italy.

Disasters of the Century

It was studied in the 2008 documentary series Disasters of the Century.

Giovanni Michelucci

Michelucci
The memorial church in Longarone — although its construction was strongly opposed by the surviving parish priest — is a late masterpiece of the famous architect Giovanni Michelucci.
During the war Michelucci built his first architectural work, a chapel on the eastern front in Casale Ladra, near Caporetto (today in Slovenia); later he was often forced to face the effects of trauma (the reconstruction of the center of Florence after the Second World War, the church at Longarone after the tragedy of Vajont dam, the plan for the popular Santa Croce district in Florence after the 1966 flood of the Arno).

List of dams and reservoirs

List of reservoirs and damsLists of reservoirs and damsDams

Malpasset Dam

Malpassetdam broke and killed 400 peopleflood victims in France

Venice

VenetianVenice, ItalyVenezia
The Vajont Dam (or Vaiont Dam) is a disused dam, completed in 1959 in the valley of the Vajont River under Monte Toc, in the municipality of Erto and Casso, 100 km (60 miles) north of Venice, Italy.

Monopoly

monopoliesmonopolisticmonopolist
The dam was conceived in the 1920s, designed by Carlo Semenza, and eventually built between 1957 and 1960 by Società Adriatica di Elettricità ("SADE", or "EDIS") (English: Adriatic Energy Corporation), the electricity supply and distribution monopoly in northeastern Italy, which was owned by Giuseppe Volpi di Misurata.

Giuseppe Volpi

Giuseppe Volpi di MisurataCount Giuseppe Volpi di MisurataVolpi di Misurata
The dam was conceived in the 1920s, designed by Carlo Semenza, and eventually built between 1957 and 1960 by Società Adriatica di Elettricità ("SADE", or "EDIS") (English: Adriatic Energy Corporation), the electricity supply and distribution monopoly in northeastern Italy, which was owned by Giuseppe Volpi di Misurata. The owner, Giuseppe Volpi di Misurata, had been Mussolini's Minister of Finances for several years.

Nationalization

nationalisationnationalisednationalized
In 1962 the dam was nationalized and came under the control of ENEL as part of the Italian Ministry for Public Works.

Electricity sector in Italy

Italycame under the controlelectricity sector
In 1962 the dam was nationalized and came under the control of ENEL as part of the Italian Ministry for Public Works.

Ministry of Infrastructure and Transport (Italy)

Ministry of Infrastructure and TransportMinister of Infrastructure and TransportItalian Ministry of Infrastructure and Transport
In 1962 the dam was nationalized and came under the control of ENEL as part of the Italian Ministry for Public Works.

Industrialisation

industrializationindustrializedindustrialised
It was described as 'the tallest dam in the world', intended to meet the growing demands of industrialization, and as of 2010 is still one of the tallest in the world.

Piave (river)

PiavePiave RiverPiave valley
The flooding from the huge wave in the Piave valley destroyed the villages of Longarone, Pirago, Rivalta, Villanova and Faè, killing around 2,000 people and turning the land below the dam into a flat plain of mud with an impact crater 60 m deep and 80 m wide. Although the dam itself remained almost intact, and two thirds of the water was retained behind it, the landslide was much larger than expected and the impact brought massive flooding and destruction to the Piave valley below.

Benito Mussolini

MussoliniBenitoDuce
The owner, Giuseppe Volpi di Misurata, had been Mussolini's Minister of Finances for several years.