Vakataka dynasty

VakatakaVakatakasVakataka EmpireVākāṭakaVakataka kingVākāṭaka dynastyVakatak EmpireVakataksVindhyasaktiVākāṭaka Empire
The Vakataka Empire was a dynasty from the Indian subcontinent that originated from the Deccan in the mid-3rd century CE.wikipedia
138 Related Articles

Deccan Plateau

DeccanDeccan regionDeccan Peninsula
The Vakataka Empire was a dynasty from the Indian subcontinent that originated from the Deccan in the mid-3rd century CE. They were the most important successors of the Satavahanas in the Deccan and contemporaneous with the Guptas in northern India.
The Deccan produced some of the major dynasties in Indian history including Pallavas, Satavahana, Vakataka, Chalukya, and Rashtrakuta dynasties, the Western Chalukya, the Kadamba Dynasty, Kakatiya Empire, Kamma Nayakas, Vijayanagara and Maratha empires and the Muslim Bahmani Sultanate, Deccan Sultanate, and the Nizam of Hyderabad.

Vindhyashakti

Little is known about Vindhyashakti (c.
250) was the founder of the Vakataka dynasty.

Chandragupta II

Chandragupta VikramadityaVikramadityaChandra Gupta II
The Gupta emperor Chandragupta II married his daughter into Vakataka royal family and with their support annexed Gujarat from the Saka Satraps in 4th century CE. Rudrasena II (380–385) is said to have married Prabhavatigupta, the daughter of the Gupta King Chandragupta II (375-413/15).
His daughter Prabhavatigupta was a queen of the southern Vakataka kingdom, and he may have had influence in the Vakataka territory during her regency.

Pravarasena I

Territorial expansion began in the reign of his son Pravarasena I. The next ruler was Pravarasena I (270-330), who maintained the realm as a great power, he was the first Vakataka ruler, who called himself a Samrat (universal ruler) and conducted wars with the Naga kings.
270) was the successor of Vindhyashakti, the founder of the Vakataka dynasty.

Ajanta Caves

AjantaAjanta caveAjantha
The rock-cut Buddhist viharas and chaityas of Ajanta Caves (a UNESCO World Heritage Site) were built under the patronage of Vakataka emperor, Harishena.
For a long time it was thought that the later caves were made over an extended period from the 4th to the 7th centuries CE, but in recent decades a series of studies by the leading expert on the caves, Walter M. Spink, have argued that most of the work took place over the very brief period from 460 to 480 CE, during the reign of Hindu Emperor Harishena of the Vākāṭaka dynasty.

Gupta Empire

GuptaGupta periodGuptas
The Gupta emperor Chandragupta II married his daughter into Vakataka royal family and with their support annexed Gujarat from the Saka Satraps in 4th century CE. They were the most important successors of the Satavahanas in the Deccan and contemporaneous with the Guptas in northern India.
His daughter Prabhavatigupta from this Naga queen was married to Rudrasena II, the Vakataka ruler of Deccan.

Madhya Pradesh

Madhya Pradesh StateMPM.P.
It appears from the Puranas that Vindhyasakti was a ruler of Vidisha (in the present day Madhya Pradesh state) but that is not considered to be correct.
Subsequently, the region came under the control of the Gupta empire in the 4th and 5th centuries, and their southern neighbours, the Vakataka's.

Maharashtra

MaharastraMaharashtra StateMaharashtra, India
But, he may have conquered parts of North Kuntala comprising Kolhapur, Satara and Solapur districts of Maharashtra. King Sarvasena made Vatsagulma, the present day Washim in Washim district of Maharashtra his capital.
The state was also ruled by Western Satraps, Gupta Empire, Gurjara-Pratihara, Vakataka, Kadambas, Chalukya Empire, Rashtrakuta Dynasty, and Western Chalukya before finally, the Yadava rule.

Washim

BashimBasimVashim
His second son, Sarvasena set up his capital at Vatsagulma (the present day Washim). King Sarvasena made Vatsagulma, the present day Washim in Washim district of Maharashtra his capital.
Washim was known earlier as Vatsagulma and it was the seat of power of the Vakataka dynasty.

Nagas of Padmavati

NagaBhavanagaNaga kings
The next ruler was Pravarasena I (270-330), who maintained the realm as a great power, he was the first Vakataka ruler, who called himself a Samrat (universal ruler) and conducted wars with the Naga kings.
Modern historians identify it with the family that is called Bharashiva (IAST: Bhāraśiva) in the records of the Vakataka dynasty.

Rudrasena I (Vakataka king)

Rudrasena IRudrasena
However, Gautamiputra predeceased him and he was succeeded by his grandson Rudrasena I, the son of Gautamiputra. Not much is known about Rudrasena I, the son of Gautamiputra, who ruled from Nandivardhana, near Ramtek hill, about 30 km from Nagpur.
c. 330 – undefined)) was a ruler of the Pravarapura-Nandivardhana branch of the Vakataka dynasty.

Wardha district

Wardha
The Pravarapura-Nandivardhana branch ruled from various sites like Pravarapura (Paunar) in Wardha district and Mansar and Nandivardhan (Nagardhan) in Nagpur district.
It was included in the empire of Mauryas, Shungas, Satavahanas and Vakatakas.

Nagpur

Nagpur, IndiaNagpur, MaharashtraNagpore
Not much is known about Rudrasena I, the son of Gautamiputra, who ruled from Nandivardhana, near Ramtek hill, about 30 km from Nagpur.
Towards the end of the 3rd century, King Vindhyasakti is known to have ruled the Nagpur region.

Sarvasena

His second son, Sarvasena set up his capital at Vatsagulma (the present day Washim).
c. 330 – undefined)) was a king of the Vakataka dynasty and the founder of the Vatsagulma branch of the line.

Prabhavatigupta

Prabhavati-guptaPrabhavati
A number of scholars, like A.S. Altekar do not agree that Rudradeva is Rudrasena I, since if Rudrasena I had been exterminated by Samudragupta, it is extremely unlikely that his son Prithivishena I would accept a Gupta princess (Prabhavatigupta) as his daughter-in-law. Rudrasena II (380–385) is said to have married Prabhavatigupta, the daughter of the Gupta King Chandragupta II (375-413/15).
405), was queen and regent of the Vakataka dynasty.

Prithivishena I

A number of scholars, like A.S. Altekar do not agree that Rudradeva is Rudrasena I, since if Rudrasena I had been exterminated by Samudragupta, it is extremely unlikely that his son Prithivishena I would accept a Gupta princess (Prabhavatigupta) as his daughter-in-law.
c. 355 – undefined)) was a king of the Pravarapura-Nandivardhana branch of the Vakataka dynasty.

Rudrasena II

Rudrasena II (380–385) is said to have married Prabhavatigupta, the daughter of the Gupta King Chandragupta II (375-413/15).
c. 380 – undefined)) was a king of the Pravarapura-Nandivardhana branch of the Vakataka dynasty.

Washim district

WashimBasim districtBasim
King Sarvasena made Vatsagulma, the present day Washim in Washim district of Maharashtra his capital.
Washim was once known as Vatsagulma, the capital of the Vatsagulma line of Vakataka dynasty.

Vishnukundina dynasty

VishnukundinaVishnukundinVishnukundinas
The Vishnukundina dynasty (IAST: Viṣṇukundina) was an Indian imperial power controlling the Deccan, Odisha and parts of South India during the 5th and 6th centuries, carving land out from the Vakataka Empire.

Harishena

Harisena
The rock-cut Buddhist viharas and chaityas of Ajanta Caves (a UNESCO World Heritage Site) were built under the patronage of Vakataka emperor, Harishena.

Middle kingdoms of India

Classical IndiaClassical periodmiddle kingdoms
The Vishnukundina Empire was an Indian dynasty that ruled over the Deccan, Odisha and parts of South India during the 5th and 6th centuries carving land out from the Vakataka Empire.

Dashakumaracharita

DaśakumāracaritaDashakumaracharitraWhat Ten Young Men Did
According to the eighth ucchvāsaḥ of the Dashakumaracharita of Dandin, which was written probably around 125 years after the fall of the Vakataka dynasty, Harishena's son, though intelligent and accomplished in all arts, neglected the study of the Dandaniti (Political Science) and gave himself up to the enjoyment of pleasures and indulged in all sorts of vices.
The Dashakumaracharita has been used to examine the creation of the Ajanta Caves, interpreting it as an extended metaphoric telling of the 5th-century fall of the Vākāṭaka dynasty, and a comparison to the 7th-century Pallava dynasty, which is the period that the work is conventionally dated to.

Indian subcontinent

IndiasubcontinentIndian
The Vakataka Empire was a dynasty from the Indian subcontinent that originated from the Deccan in the mid-3rd century CE.

Malwa

MalavaMalwa PlateauMālwa
Their state is believed to have extended from the southern edges of Malwa and Gujarat in the north to the Tungabhadra River in the south as well as from the Arabian Sea in the west to the edges of Chhattisgarh in the east.

Gujarat

Gujarat StateGujarat, IndiaGujrat
The Gupta emperor Chandragupta II married his daughter into Vakataka royal family and with their support annexed Gujarat from the Saka Satraps in 4th century CE. Their state is believed to have extended from the southern edges of Malwa and Gujarat in the north to the Tungabhadra River in the south as well as from the Arabian Sea in the west to the edges of Chhattisgarh in the east.