Vakhsh River

VakhshSurkhobSurkhob RiverKyzyl-SuuKyzyl-Suu RiverVakhsh River ValleySurkhabSurkhob valleyVakhsh Canal
The Vakhsh (River), also known as the Surkhob, in north-central Tajikistan, and the Kyzyl-Suu, in Kyrgyzstan, is a Central Asian river, and one of the main rivers of Tajikistan.wikipedia
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Amu Darya

OxusOxus RiverAmu Darya River
It is a tributary of the Amu Darya river.
It is formed by the junction of the Vakhsh and Panj rivers, in the Tigrovaya Balka Nature Reserve on the border between Tajikistan and Afghanistan, and flows from there north-westwards into the southern remnants of the Aral Sea.

Tigrovaya Balka Nature Reserve

Tigrovaya Balka
The Tigrovaya Balka Nature Reserve, which was the last habitat of the now-extinct Caspian tiger in the former USSR, is located at the confluence of the Vakhsh and the Panj.
Tigrovaya Balka Nature Reserve is in Tajikistan close to the Afghan border where the Vakhsh River and the Panj River join to form the Amu Darya.

Tajikistan

TadjikistanTajikRepublic of Tajikistan
The Vakhsh (River), also known as the Surkhob, in north-central Tajikistan, and the Kyzyl-Suu, in Kyrgyzstan, is a Central Asian river, and one of the main rivers of Tajikistan.
The only major areas of lower land are in the north (part of the Fergana Valley), and in the southern Kofarnihon and Vakhsh river valleys, which form the Amu Darya.

Fedchenko Glacier

Fedchenko
Some of the largest glaciers in Tajikistan, including the Fedchenko and Abramov glaciers (the former of which is the longest glacier in the world outside of the polar regions), drain into the Vakhsh.
The glacier begins at an elevation of 6200 m above sea level, and eventually melts and empties into the Balandkiik River near the border with Kyrgyzstan at an elevation of 2909 m. Its waters eventually feed down the Muksu, Surkhob, Vakhsh, and Amu Darya rivers into the Aral Sea.

Nurek Dam

Nurek ReservoirNurekNurek Hydroelectric Power Plant
Measurements at the Nurek Dam indicate that winter flow rates average around 150 m 3 /s, whereas flow rates during the summer months can exceed 1500 m 3 /s – a tenfold increase. Hydroelectricity provides 91% of the country's electricity as of 2005, and 90% of that total comes from the five completed dams along the Vakhsh, dominated by the world's second tallest dam, the Nurek.
The Nurek Dam (Tajik: Нерӯгоҳи обии Норак, Nerūgohi obii Norak, Tajik for Nurek Hydro-electric Station) is an earth-fill embankment dam on the Vakhsh River in Tajikistan.

Muksu River

Muksu
Its largest tributaries are the Muksu and the Obihingou; the Vakhsh River proper begins at the confluence of the Obihingou and Surkhob rivers.
It is a tributary of the Vakhsh River which in turn is a tributary of the Amu Darya.

Sangtuda 1 Hydroelectric Power Plant

Sangtuda 1Sangtuda 1 Dam
The other four dams, downstream of Nurek, are Baipaza, Sangtuda 1, Sangtuda 2 and Golovnaya Dams.
Sangtuda 1 Hydroelectric Power Plant is a hydroelectric power plant, located on the Vakhsh River in Tajikistan.

Panj River

PanjPyanjAb-i-Panj
It ends when it flows into the Panj River to form the Amu Darya, at the border of Tajikistan and Afghanistan.
It then turns towards the southwest, before joining the river Vakhsh and forming the greatest river of Central Asia, the Amudarya.

Baipaza Dam

Baipaza
The other four dams, downstream of Nurek, are Baipaza, Sangtuda 1, Sangtuda 2 and Golovnaya Dams.
The Baipaza Dam is a concrete face rock-fill dam on the Vakhsh River about 9 km southeast of Yovon in Khatlon Province, Tajikistan.

Golovnaya Dam

The other four dams, downstream of Nurek, are Baipaza, Sangtuda 1, Sangtuda 2 and Golovnaya Dams.
The Golovnaya Dam is an earth-fill embankment dam on the Vakhsh River just east of Sarband in Khatlon Province, Tajikistan.

Caspian tiger

Panthera tigris virgatatigerPersian tiger
The Tigrovaya Balka Nature Reserve, which was the last habitat of the now-extinct Caspian tiger in the former USSR, is located at the confluence of the Vakhsh and the Panj.
Tigrovaya Balka was apparently the last refuge of Caspian tigers in the Soviet Union, and is situated in the lower reaches of Vakhsh River between the Piandj and Kofarnihon Rivers near the border of Afghanistan.

Rogun Dam

RogunRogun power plantRoghun Dam
Another four dams are planned or under construction, including the Rogun Dam.
Rogun Dam is an embankment dam under construction on the Vakhsh River in southern Tajikistan.

Tursunzoda

TursunzadeRegar/Tursunzoda
) Hydroelectricity powers the aluminum production at the Tajik Aluminum Company in Tursunzoda, a major source of Tajikistan's industrial output and export revenue.
In the 1960s, the nearby Nurek Dam hydroelectric power station on the Vakhsh River made the city a good location for industry, and besides the aluminium plant, there are also china, brick, cable, and cotton cleaning plants.

Dushanbe

StalinabadDushanbe, TajikistanDushambe
This dependence has caused energy crises in the winters of 2008 and 2009, in which the capital, Dushanbe, lost power and heating.
Tajikistan's principal railways are in the southern region and connect Dushanbe with the industrial areas of the Gissar and Vakhsh valleys and with Uzbekistan, Turkmenistan, Kazakhstan and Russia.

Kyrgyzstan

Kyrgyz RepublicKyrgyzKyrghyzstan
The Vakhsh (River), also known as the Surkhob, in north-central Tajikistan, and the Kyzyl-Suu, in Kyrgyzstan, is a Central Asian river, and one of the main rivers of Tajikistan.

Central Asia

Central AsianCentralCentral Asian Republics
The Vakhsh (River), also known as the Surkhob, in north-central Tajikistan, and the Kyzyl-Suu, in Kyrgyzstan, is a Central Asian river, and one of the main rivers of Tajikistan.

Tributary

tributariesright tributaryleft tributary
It is a tributary of the Amu Darya river.

Pamir Mountains

PamirsPamirPamir Plateau
The river flows through the Pamirs, passing through very mountainous territory that frequently restricts its flow to narrow channels within deep gorges.

Confluence

confluentconfluxsangam
Its largest tributaries are the Muksu and the Obihingou; the Vakhsh River proper begins at the confluence of the Obihingou and Surkhob rivers.

Afghanistan

AfghanIslamic Republic of AfghanistanAfghans
It ends when it flows into the Panj River to form the Amu Darya, at the border of Tajikistan and Afghanistan.

Main stem

mainstemparentparent river
The river contributes about 25% of the total flow of the Amu Darya, its parent river.

Snowmelt

snow meltmeltwatermelt snow
However, since the Vakhsh is fed mostly by melting snow and glaciers, these flow rates have great seasonal variability between winter and summer.

Glacier

glaciersglacialglaciated
However, since the Vakhsh is fed mostly by melting snow and glaciers, these flow rates have great seasonal variability between winter and summer.

Hydroelectricity

hydroelectrichydroelectric powerhydroelectric dam
Hydroelectricity provides 91% of the country's electricity as of 2005, and 90% of that total comes from the five completed dams along the Vakhsh, dominated by the world's second tallest dam, the Nurek.

Dam

earthfilldamsconcrete-face rock-fill dam
Hydroelectricity provides 91% of the country's electricity as of 2005, and 90% of that total comes from the five completed dams along the Vakhsh, dominated by the world's second tallest dam, the Nurek.