Valdemar Poulsen

telegraphonePoulsen, Valdemara Danish inventorPoulsenPoulsen's TelegraphoneValdemar Poulsen Medal
Valdemar Poulsen (23 November 1869 – 23 July 1942) was a Danish engineer who made significant contributions to early radio technology.wikipedia
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Wire recording

wire recorderwire recordersmagnetic wire recorder
He developed a magnetic wire recorder called the telegraphone in 1898 and the first continuous wave radio transmitter, the Poulsen arc transmitter, in 1903, which was used in some of the first broadcasting stations until the early 1920s. Magnetic wire recording, and its successor, magnetic tape recording, involve the use of a magnetizable medium which moves past a recording head.
Wire recording or magnetic wire recording was the first early magnetic recording technology, an analog type of audio storage in which a magnetic recording is made on a thin 37 gauge (0.004") steel wire. The first crude magnetic recorder was invented in 1898 by Valdemar Poulsen. The first magnetic recorder to be made commercially available anywhere was the Telegraphone, manufactured by the American Telegraphone Company, Springfield, Massachusetts.

Magnetic storage

magnetic recordingmagnetic mediamagnetic disk
The magnetic recording was demonstrated in principle as early as 1898 by Poulsen in his telegraphone.
The first publicly demonstrated (Paris Exposition of 1900) magnetic recorder was invented by Valdemar Poulsen in 1898.

Tape recorder

audio tapetape machineaudiotape
Magnetic wire recording, and its successor, magnetic tape recording, involve the use of a magnetizable medium which moves past a recording head.
Magnetic recording was conceived as early as 1878 by the American engineer Oberlin Smith and demonstrated in practice in 1898 by Danish engineer Valdemar Poulsen.

Exposition Universelle (1900)

Exposition UniverselleParis ExpositionParis Exposition of 1900
At the 1900 World's Fair in Paris, Poulsen had the chance to record the voice of Emperor Franz Josef of Austria which is believed to be the oldest surviving magnetic audio recording today.
The fair, visited by nearly 50 million, displayed many technological innovations, including the Grande Roue de Paris Ferris wheel, the moving sidewalk, diesel engines, talking films, escalators, and the telegraphone (the first magnetic audio recorder).

Peder Oluf Pedersen

P O PedersenP.O. Pedersen
Poulsen obtained a Telegraphone patent in 1898, and with his assistant, Peder Oluf Pedersen, later developed other magnetic recorders that recorded on steel wire, tape, or disks.
He is notable for his work on electrotechnology and his cooperation with Valdemar Poulsen on the developmental work on Wire recorders, which he called a telegraphone, and the arc converter known as the Poulsen Arc Transmitter.

Arc converter

Poulsen arcarc transmitterArc transmitters
He developed a magnetic wire recorder called the telegraphone in 1898 and the first continuous wave radio transmitter, the Poulsen arc transmitter, in 1903, which was used in some of the first broadcasting stations until the early 1920s. Poulsen developed an arc converter in 1908, referred to as the "Poulsen Arc Transmitter", which was widely used in radio before the advent of vacuum tube technology.
The arc converter, sometimes called the arc transmitter, or Poulsen arc after Danish engineer Valdemar Poulsen who invented it in 1903, was a variety of spark transmitter used in early wireless telegraphy.

Valdemar Poulsen Gold Medal

Valdemar Poulsen Medal
The Valdemar Poulsen Gold Medal was awarded each year for outstanding research in the field of radio techniques and related fields by the.
The Valdemar Poulsen Gold Medal, named after radio pioneer Valdemar Poulsen, was awarded each year for outstanding research in the field of radio techniques and related fields by the.

Denmark

DanishKingdom of DenmarkConstituent country
Valdemar Poulsen (23 November 1869 – 23 July 1942) was a Danish engineer who made significant contributions to early radio technology.

Engineer

engineersconsulting engineerIr.
Valdemar Poulsen (23 November 1869 – 23 July 1942) was a Danish engineer who made significant contributions to early radio technology.

Continuous wave

CWcontinuous-wavecontinuous-wave operation
He developed a magnetic wire recorder called the telegraphone in 1898 and the first continuous wave radio transmitter, the Poulsen arc transmitter, in 1903, which was used in some of the first broadcasting stations until the early 1920s.

Transmitter

radio transmittertransmittersradio transmitters
He developed a magnetic wire recorder called the telegraphone in 1898 and the first continuous wave radio transmitter, the Poulsen arc transmitter, in 1903, which was used in some of the first broadcasting stations until the early 1920s.

Copenhagen

Copenhagen, DenmarkKøbenhavnKopenhagen
Poulsen was born on 23 November 1869 in Copenhagen.

Supreme Court (Denmark)

Supreme CourtSupreme Court of DenmarkDanish Supreme Court
He was the son of the Supreme Court judge Jonas Nicolai Johannes Poulsen and Rebekka Magdalene (née Brandt).

Birth name

néenee
He was the son of the Supreme Court judge Jonas Nicolai Johannes Poulsen and Rebekka Magdalene (née Brandt).

Signal

signalselectrical signalsignaling
An electrical signal, which is analogous to the sound that is to be recorded, is fed to the recording head, inducing a pattern of magnetization similar to the signal.

Sound

audiosound wavesound waves
An electrical signal, which is analogous to the sound that is to be recorded, is fed to the recording head, inducing a pattern of magnetization similar to the signal.

Recording head

record headheadheads
An electrical signal, which is analogous to the sound that is to be recorded, is fed to the recording head, inducing a pattern of magnetization similar to the signal. A playback head (which may be the same as the recording head) can then pick up the changes in the magnetic field from the tape and convert them into an electrical signal.

Tape head

erase headplayback headhead
A playback head (which may be the same as the recording head) can then pick up the changes in the magnetic field from the tape and convert them into an electrical signal.

Paris

Paris, FranceParísParisian
At the 1900 World's Fair in Paris, Poulsen had the chance to record the voice of Emperor Franz Josef of Austria which is believed to be the oldest surviving magnetic audio recording today.

Franz Joseph I of Austria

Franz Joseph IFranz JosephEmperor Franz Joseph
At the 1900 World's Fair in Paris, Poulsen had the chance to record the voice of Emperor Franz Josef of Austria which is believed to be the oldest surviving magnetic audio recording today.

Vacuum tube

vacuum tubestubethermionic valve
Poulsen developed an arc converter in 1908, referred to as the "Poulsen Arc Transmitter", which was widely used in radio before the advent of vacuum tube technology.

Google Doodle

DoodleGoogle DoodlesGoogle's Doodle
On 23 November 2018 he was honoured with a Google Doodle for his 149th birthday.

Ferracute Machine Company

Oberlin Smith's ideas in magnetic recording were used by Valdemar Poulsen when he developed magnetic recording successfully.