Value chain

value-added chainIndustry Level Value Chainsupporting value chainsvalue chain analysisValue Chain Modelvalue chain sectorsvalue deliveryvalue system
A value chain is a set of activities that a firm operating in a specific industry performs in order to deliver a valuable product (i.e., good and/or service) for the market.wikipedia
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Global value chain

global supply chainglobal value chainsinternational supply chains
According to the OECD Secretary-General the emergence of global value chains (GVCs) in the late 1990s provided a catalyst for accelerated change in the landscape of international investment and trade, with major, far-reaching consequences on governments as well as enterprises.
GVC is similar to Industry Level Value Chain but encompasses operations at the global level.

Strategic management

business strategycorporate strategystrategy
Porter revised the strategy paradigm again in 1985, writing that superior performance of the processes and activities performed by organizations as part of their value chain is the foundation of competitive advantage, thereby outlining a process view of strategy.

Virtual value chain

This value chain begins with the content supplied by the provider, which is then distributed and supported by the information infrastructure; thereupon the context provider supplies actual customer interaction.

Competitive advantage

sustainable competitive advantagecompetitive strategyunfair advantage
To achieve and sustain a competitive advantage, and to support that advantage with information technologies, a firm must understand every component of this value system.

Value-stream mapping

Value Stream Mappingvalue streamvalue chain mapping
The simpler concept of value stream mapping, a cross-functional process which was developed over the next decade, had some success in the early 1990s.
The difference between a value stream and a value chain is that a value stream focuses only on areas of a firm that add value to a product or service, whereas a value chain refers to all of the activities within a company.

Agricultural value chain

value chainAgricultural Value Chainsvalue chains
The term value chain was first popularized in a book published in 1985 by Michael Porter, who used it to illustrate how companies could achieve what he called “competitive advantage” by adding value within their organization.

Demand chain

Demand-driven supply network
The demand chain is that part of the value chain which drives demand.

Supply chain

supplierssupply chainssupply-chain
An industry value-chain is a physical representation of the various processes involved in producing goods (and services), starting with raw materials and ending with the delivered product (also known as the supply chain).
Supply chains link value chains.

Porter's five forces analysis

Porter five forces analysisPorter 5 forces analysis5 forces model
Other Porter strategy tools include the value chain and generic competitive strategies.

Value grid

The value grid model was proposed by Pil and Holweg as a means to show that the way firms compete has shifted away from the linear value chain way management theory has traditionally thought about value chain management.

Value shop

Compared to Michael Porter's concept of the value chain, there is no sequential fixed set of activities or resources utilized to create value.

Marketing strategy

marketing strategiesstrategic marketingmarketing tool

Beneficiation

beatificationBenefication (metallurgy)beneficiat
For example, in the diamond industry, the beneficiation imperative argues that cutting and polishing (processes within the diamond value chain) should be conducted in-country to maximise the local economic contribution.

Value migration

The value chain is the sum of all activities that add utility to the customer.

Product (business)

productproductsmerchandise
A value chain is a set of activities that a firm operating in a specific industry performs in order to deliver a valuable product (i.e., good and/or service) for the market.

Goods

goodeconomic goodcommodity
A value chain is a set of activities that a firm operating in a specific industry performs in order to deliver a valuable product (i.e., good and/or service) for the market.

Service (economics)

servicesserviceBusiness Services
A value chain is a set of activities that a firm operating in a specific industry performs in order to deliver a valuable product (i.e., good and/or service) for the market.

Market (economics)

marketmarketsmarket forces
A value chain is a set of activities that a firm operating in a specific industry performs in order to deliver a valuable product (i.e., good and/or service) for the market.

Michael Porter

Michael E. PorterMike PorterPorter
The concept comes through business management and was first described by Michael Porter in his 1985 best-seller, Competitive Advantage: Creating and Sustaining Superior Performance.

Strategic business unit

business unitstrategic business unitsunit manager
The appropriate level for constructing a value chain is the business unit, not division or corporate level.

Division (business)

Divisiondivisionsbusiness division
The appropriate level for constructing a value chain is the business unit, not division or corporate level.

Corporation

corporatecorporationsincorporated
The appropriate level for constructing a value chain is the business unit, not division or corporate level.

Diamond cutting

diamond cutterdiamond cuttersBruting
The activity of a diamond cutter can illustrate the difference between cost and the value chain.

ISO 9000

ISO 9001ISO 9001:2000ISO 9002
Typically, the described value chain and the documentation of processes, assessment and auditing of adherence to the process routines are at the core of the quality certification of the business, e.g. ISO 9001.