Vassal and tributary states of the Ottoman Empire

tributary statesVassal state of the Ottoman Empirevassal statesautonomous vassal statetributary stateVassalvassal stateOttoman vassalsuzerain powertributary princes of the Ottoman Empire
Vassal States were a number of tributary or vassal states, usually on the periphery of the Ottoman Empire under suzerainty of the Porte, over which direct control was not established, for various reasons.wikipedia
152 Related Articles

Ottoman Empire

OttomanOttomansTurks
Vassal States were a number of tributary or vassal states, usually on the periphery of the Ottoman Empire under suzerainty of the Porte, over which direct control was not established, for various reasons.
At the beginning of the 17th century, the empire contained 32 provinces and numerous vassal states.

Khedivate of Egypt

EgyptEgyptianKhedivate
Some states within the eyalet system included sancakbeys who were local to their sanjak or who inherited their position (e.g., Samtskhe, some Kurdish sanjaks), areas that were permitted to elect their own leaders (e.g., areas of Albania, Epirus, and Morea (Mani Peninsula was nominally a part of Aegean Islands Province but Maniot beys were tributary vassals of the Porte.)), or de facto independent eyalets (e.g., the Barbaresque 'regencies' Algiers, Tunis, Tripolitania in the Maghreb, and later the Khedivate of Egypt).
The Khedivate of Egypt was an autonomous tributary state of the Ottoman Empire, established and ruled by the Muhammad Ali Dynasty following the defeat and expulsion of Napoleon Bonaparte's forces which brought an end to the short-lived French occupation of Lower Egypt.

Crimean Khanate

Crimean TatarsCrimeaCrimean
Their number varied over time but notable were the Khanate of Crimea, Wallachia, Moldavia, Transylvania and the Principality of Serbia from 1815 until its full independence half of century later.
The Crimean Khanate (Крымын ханлиг; Crimean Tatar / Ottoman Turkish: Къырым Ханлыгъы, Qırım Hanlığı, قرم خانلغى or Къырым Юрту, Qırım Yurtu, قرم يورتى; Крымское ханство; Кримське ханство, Krymśke chanstvo; Chanat Krymski) was a Turkic vassal state of the Ottoman Empire from 1478 to 1774, the longest-lived of the Turkic khanates that succeeded the empire of the Golden Horde of Mongol origin.

Eastern Hungarian Kingdom

John Szapolyai's Hungarian kingdomTransylvaniaeastern territories of the medieval Kingdom of Hungary
Other states such as Bulgaria, the Eastern Hungarian Kingdom, the Serbian Despotate and the Kingdom of Bosnia were vassals before being absorbed entirely or partially into the Empire.

United Principalities of Moldavia and Wallachia

RomaniaUnion of the PrincipalitiesUnited Principalities (Romania)
During the nineteenth century, as Ottoman territory receded, several breakaway states from the Ottoman Empire had the status of vassal states (e.g. they paid tribute to the Ottoman Empire), before gaining complete independence. They were however de facto independent, including having their own foreign policy and their own independent military. This was the case with the principalities of Serbia, Romania and Bulgaria.

Administrative divisions of the Ottoman Empire

eyaletprovinces of the Ottoman Empirevilayets
Principality of Wallachia (Eflâk Prensliği), 1396–1397, 1417–1861 with some interruptions; briefly annexed as an eyalet from 1595–96
Outside this system were various types of vassal and tributary states.

Moldavia

Principality of MoldaviaMoldavianMoldovan
Their number varied over time but notable were the Khanate of Crimea, Wallachia, Moldavia, Transylvania and the Principality of Serbia from 1815 until its full independence half of century later.

Principality of Transylvania (1570–1711)

Principality of TransylvaniaTransylvaniaTransylvanian
Principality of Transylvania (Erdel), 1570–1692 with some interruptions

Principality of Upper Hungary

Upper Hungaryprince of Upper Hungaryseparate vassal state
Principality of Upper Hungary (modern-day Slovakia), 1682–1685 under Imre Thököly

Aceh Sultanate

Acehsultan of AcehAcèh Darussalam
Sultanate of Aceh, 1569-late 18th century

Eastern Rumelia

(Eastern) RumeliaE. RumeliaEast Rumelia
Eastern Rumelia (Doğu Rumeli), 1878–1885: established by the Treaty of Berlin on 13 July 1878 as an autonomous province; in a personal union with the tributary Principality of Bulgaria on 6 September 1885 but remained de jure under Ottoman suzerainty; annexed by Bulgaria on 5 October 1908.

Tributary state

tributarytributariestributary states
Vassal States were a number of tributary or vassal states, usually on the periphery of the Ottoman Empire under suzerainty of the Porte, over which direct control was not established, for various reasons.

Vassal state

vassalvassal statesvassals
Vassal States were a number of tributary or vassal states, usually on the periphery of the Ottoman Empire under suzerainty of the Porte, over which direct control was not established, for various reasons.

Suzerainty

suzerainsuzerainsparamountcy
Vassal States were a number of tributary or vassal states, usually on the periphery of the Ottoman Empire under suzerainty of the Porte, over which direct control was not established, for various reasons.

Sublime Porte

PorteOttoman PorteOttoman government
Vassal States were a number of tributary or vassal states, usually on the periphery of the Ottoman Empire under suzerainty of the Porte, over which direct control was not established, for various reasons.

Buffer state

bufferbuffer statesbuffers
Some of these states served as buffer states between the Ottomans and Christianity in Europe or Shi’ism in Asia.

Shia Islam

ShiaShi'aShiite
Some of these states served as buffer states between the Ottomans and Christianity in Europe or Shi’ism in Asia.

Transylvania

TransylvanianTransilvaniaSiebenbürgen
Their number varied over time but notable were the Khanate of Crimea, Wallachia, Moldavia, Transylvania and the Principality of Serbia from 1815 until its full independence half of century later.

Principality of Serbia

SerbiaPrincipalitySerbian
Their number varied over time but notable were the Khanate of Crimea, Wallachia, Moldavia, Transylvania and the Principality of Serbia from 1815 until its full independence half of century later. During the nineteenth century, as Ottoman territory receded, several breakaway states from the Ottoman Empire had the status of vassal states (e.g. they paid tribute to the Ottoman Empire), before gaining complete independence. They were however de facto independent, including having their own foreign policy and their own independent military. This was the case with the principalities of Serbia, Romania and Bulgaria.

Bulgaria

🇧🇬BULBulgarian
Other states such as Bulgaria, the Eastern Hungarian Kingdom, the Serbian Despotate and the Kingdom of Bosnia were vassals before being absorbed entirely or partially into the Empire.

Serbian Despotate

SerbiaSerbian DespotSerbian
Other states such as Bulgaria, the Eastern Hungarian Kingdom, the Serbian Despotate and the Kingdom of Bosnia were vassals before being absorbed entirely or partially into the Empire.

Kingdom of Bosnia

BosniaBosnianBosnian Kingdom
Other states such as Bulgaria, the Eastern Hungarian Kingdom, the Serbian Despotate and the Kingdom of Bosnia were vassals before being absorbed entirely or partially into the Empire.

Imereti

Imereti ProvinceImereti regionImeretian
Still others had commercial value such as Imeretia, Mingrelia, Chios, the Duchy of Naxos, and the Republic of Ragusa (Dubrovnik).

Samegrelo

MingreliaMegrelianMegrelia
Still others had commercial value such as Imeretia, Mingrelia, Chios, the Duchy of Naxos, and the Republic of Ragusa (Dubrovnik).

Chios

ChianChiansisland of Chios
Still others had commercial value such as Imeretia, Mingrelia, Chios, the Duchy of Naxos, and the Republic of Ragusa (Dubrovnik).