Vegetarianism and religion

religiousreligious beliefsreligious prohibition of beef consumptionreligious reasonsunder various religious beliefsvegetarian
Vegetarianism is strongly linked with a number of religions that originated in ancient India (Hinduism, Jainism and Buddhism).wikipedia
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Ahimsa

non-violencegenerally pacifist traditionnon-harming
Vegetarianism in Jainism is based on the principle of nonviolence (ahimsa, literally "non-injuring"). The principle of nonviolence (Ahimsa) applied to animals is connected with the intention to avoid negative karmic influences which result from violence.
Vegetarianism and religion

Vegetarianism

vegetarianvegetariansvegetarian diet
In Jainism, vegetarianism is mandatory for everyone; in Hinduism and Mahayana Buddhism, it is advocated by some influential scriptures and religious authorities.
Such ethical motivations have been codified under various religious beliefs, as well as animal rights advocacy.

Jewish Veg

JVNA
Groups advocating for Jewish vegetarianism include Jewish Veg, a contemporary grassroots organization promoting veganism as "God's ideal diet", and the Shamayim V'Aretz Institute, which promotes a vegan diet in the Jewish community through animal welfare activism, kosher veganism, and Jewish spirituality.
Vegetarianism and religion

Buddhist cuisine

shōjin-ryōriBuddhistexclusively vegetarian menu
In China and Vietnam, monks typically eat no meat, with other restrictions as well.
Vegetarianism and religion

Ethics of eating meat

ethicalethical vegetarianeating meat
Ethics of vegetarianism
Ethical vegetarians and ethical vegans may also object to the practices underlying the production of meat, or cite their concerns about animal welfare, animal rights, environmental ethics, and religious reasons.

Fasting

fastfastsfasted
Within Eastern Christianity, Vegetarianism is practiced as part of fasting during the Great Lent (although shellfish and other non-vertebrate products are generally considered acceptable during some periods of this time); vegan fasting is particularly common in Eastern Orthodoxy and Oriental Orthodox Churches, such as the Coptic Orthodox Church of Alexandria, which generally fasts 210 days out of the year.
Vegetarianism and religion

Rastafari

RastafarianRastaRastafarians
Rastafarians generally follow a diet called "I-tal", which eschews the eating of food that has been artificially preserved, flavoured, or chemically altered in any way.
Vegetarianism and religion

Hinduism

HinduHindusHindu religion
Vegetarianism is strongly linked with a number of religions that originated in ancient India (Hinduism, Jainism and Buddhism).

Jainism

JainJainsJaina
Vegetarianism in Jainism is based on the principle of nonviolence (ahimsa, literally "non-injuring"). Vegetarianism is strongly linked with a number of religions that originated in ancient India (Hinduism, Jainism and Buddhism).

Buddhism

BuddhistBuddhistsBuddha
Vegetarianism is strongly linked with a number of religions that originated in ancient India (Hinduism, Jainism and Buddhism).

Mahayana

Mahayana BuddhismMahāyānaMahayana Buddhist
In Jainism, vegetarianism is mandatory for everyone; in Hinduism and Mahayana Buddhism, it is advocated by some influential scriptures and religious authorities.

Christianity

ChristianChristiansChristian faith
Comparatively, in the Abrahamic religions (Judaism, Christianity, and Islam), the Bahá'í Faith and Dharmic religions such as Sikhism, vegetarianism is less commonly viewed as a religious obligation, although in all these faiths there are groups actively promoting vegetarianism on religious grounds.

Islam

MuslimMuslimsIslamic
Comparatively, in the Abrahamic religions (Judaism, Christianity, and Islam), the Bahá'í Faith and Dharmic religions such as Sikhism, vegetarianism is less commonly viewed as a religious obligation, although in all these faiths there are groups actively promoting vegetarianism on religious grounds.

Bahá'í Faith

Bahá'íBahá'ísBaha'i
Comparatively, in the Abrahamic religions (Judaism, Christianity, and Islam), the Bahá'í Faith and Dharmic religions such as Sikhism, vegetarianism is less commonly viewed as a religious obligation, although in all these faiths there are groups actively promoting vegetarianism on religious grounds.

Dharma

dhammadharmicdharmas
Comparatively, in the Abrahamic religions (Judaism, Christianity, and Islam), the Bahá'í Faith and Dharmic religions such as Sikhism, vegetarianism is less commonly viewed as a religious obligation, although in all these faiths there are groups actively promoting vegetarianism on religious grounds.

Sikhism

SikhSikhsSikh religion
Comparatively, in the Abrahamic religions (Judaism, Christianity, and Islam), the Bahá'í Faith and Dharmic religions such as Sikhism, vegetarianism is less commonly viewed as a religious obligation, although in all these faiths there are groups actively promoting vegetarianism on religious grounds.

Indian religions

religionDharmic religionsIndian
Most Indian religions have philosophical schools that forbid consumption of meat and Jainism institutes an outright ban on the same.

India

🇮🇳IndianIND
Consequently, India is home to more vegetarians than any other country.

Sanskrit

Skt.classical SanskritSanskrit language
Moreover, Jains try to avoid unnecessary injury to plants and suksma jiva (Sanskrit for subtle life forms; minuscule organisms).

Karma in Jainism

karmakarmasJainism
Every act by which a person directly or indirectly supports killing or injury is seen as violence (hinsa), which creates harmful karma.

Nonviolence

nonviolentnon-violencenon-violent
The principle of nonviolence (Ahimsa) applied to animals is connected with the intention to avoid negative karmic influences which result from violence.

Karma

karmickammakarmas
The principle of nonviolence (Ahimsa) applied to animals is connected with the intention to avoid negative karmic influences which result from violence.

Vedic period

VedicVedic timesVedic culture
Hindu scriptures belong or refer to the Vedic period which lasted till about 500 BCE according to the chronological division by modern historians.

Historical Vedic religion

VedicVedic religionBrahmanism
In the historical Vedic religion, the predecessor of Hinduism, meat eating was not banned in principle, but was restricted by specific rules.