Vein

veinsvenousvenous systemphlebologyvenous valvesvenationvenous circulationvenous valvevalvesVein valve
Veins are blood vessels that carry blood towards the heart.wikipedia
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Umbilical vein

umbilicalumbilical veins[umbilical] veins
Most veins carry deoxygenated blood from the tissues back to the heart; exceptions are the pulmonary and umbilical veins, both of which carry oxygenated blood to the heart.
The umbilical vein is a vein present during fetal development that carries oxygenated blood from the placenta into the growing fetus.

Pulmonary vein

pulmonary veinspulmonaryPulmonary venous
Most veins carry deoxygenated blood from the tissues back to the heart; exceptions are the pulmonary and umbilical veins, both of which carry oxygenated blood to the heart.
The pulmonary veins are the veins that transfer oxygenated blood from the lungs to the heart.

Blood

human bloodhematologicaloxygen consumption
Veins are blood vessels that carry blood towards the heart.
In animals with lungs, arterial blood carries oxygen from inhaled air to the tissues of the body, and venous blood carries carbon dioxide, a waste product of metabolism produced by cells, from the tissues to the lungs to be exhaled.

Superficial vein

superficial veinssuperficialsuperficial vessels
Superficial vein is a vein that is close to the surface of the body.

Deep vein

deepdeep veinsdeep vessels
A deep vein is a vein that is deep in the body.

Venous blood

peripheral bloodvenousblood
Veins are translucent, so the color a vein appears from an organism's exterior is determined in large part by the color of venous blood, which is usually dark red as a result of its low oxygen content.
Venous blood is deoxygenated blood which travels from the peripheral vessels, through the venous system into the right atrium of the heart.

Heart

cardiachuman heartapex of the heart
Veins are blood vessels that carry blood towards the heart.
This is achieved by the coronary circulation, which includes arteries, veins, and lymphatic vessels.

Superior vena cava

superioranterior vena cavaSVC
The superior vena cava carries blood from the arms and head to the right atrium of the heart, while the inferior vena cava carries blood from the legs and abdomen to the heart.
The superior vena cava (SVC) is the superior of the two venae cavae, the great venous trunks that return deoxygenated blood from the systemic circulation to the right atrium of the heart.

Venae cavae

vena cavavena cavaevenæ cavæ
The largest veins in the human body are the venae cavae.
The venae cavae (from the Latin for "hollow veins", singular "vena cava" ) are two large veins (venous trunks) that return deoxygenated blood from the body into the heart.

Communicating vein

Communicating veinsperforating veins
Communicating veins are veins that communicate two different points of the venous system.

Systemic venous system

systemicSystemic veinsystemic system
In human anatomy, the systemic venous system refers to veins that drain into the right atrium without passing through two vascular beds (i.e.

Inferior vena cava

inferiorIVCposterior vena cava
The superior vena cava carries blood from the arms and head to the right atrium of the heart, while the inferior vena cava carries blood from the legs and abdomen to the heart.
The inferior vena cava is the lower ("inferior") of the two venae cavae, the two large veins that carry deoxygenated blood from the body to the right auricle of the heart: the inferior vena cava carries blood from the lower half of the body whilst the superior vena cava carries blood from the upper half of the body.

Peripheral vascular system

peripheral veinperipheral arteriesperipheral vessel
The peripheral veins carry blood from the limbs and hands and feet.
The peripheral vascular system is the part of the circulatory system that consists of the veins and arteries not in the chest or abdomen (i.e. in the arms, hands, legs and feet).

Venipuncture

venesectionphlebotomyblood samples
During procedures requiring venous access such as venipuncture, one may notice a subtle "pop" as the needle penetrates this layer.
In medicine, venipuncture or venepuncture is the process of obtaining intravenous access for the purpose of intravenous therapy or for blood sampling of venous blood.

Smooth muscle

smooth muscle cellssmooth musclessmooth muscle cell
The middle layer of bands of smooth muscle are called tunica media and are, in general, much thinner than those of arteries, as veins do not function primarily in a contractile manner and are not subject to the high pressures of systole, as arteries are.
Smooth muscle cells are found in the walls of hollow organs, including the stomach, intestines, urinary bladder and uterus, and in the walls of passageways, such as the arteries and veins of the circulatory system, and the tracts of the respiratory, urinary, and reproductive systems.

Portal venous system

portal circulationportal systemportal blood vessels
The portal venous system is a series of veins or venules that directly connect two capillary beds.
In the circulatory system of animals, a portal venous system occurs when a capillary bed pools into another capillary bed through veins, without first going through the heart.

Portal vein

hepatic portal veinportalhepatic portal
Examples of such systems include the hepatic portal vein and hypophyseal portal system.
The portal vein is not a true vein, because it conducts blood to capillary beds in the liver and not directly to the heart.

Tunica intima

intimaintimalinner layer
The interior is lined with endothelial cells called tunica intima.
The tunica intima (New Latin "inner coat"), or intima for short, is the innermost tunica (layer) of an artery or vein.

Atrium (heart)

right atriumatrialeft atrium
The superior vena cava carries blood from the arms and head to the right atrium of the heart, while the inferior vena cava carries blood from the legs and abdomen to the heart. These are two large veins which enter the right atrium of the heart from above and below. The de-oxygenated blood is taken by veins to the right atrium of the heart, which transfers the blood to the right ventricle, where it is then pumped through the pulmonary arteries to the lungs.
There are two atria in the human heart – the left atrium receives blood from the pulmonary (lung) circulation, and the right atrium receives blood from the venae cavae (venous circulation).

Tunica media

mediamedia wallmedial
The middle layer of bands of smooth muscle are called tunica media and are, in general, much thinner than those of arteries, as veins do not function primarily in a contractile manner and are not subject to the high pressures of systole, as arteries are.
The tunica media (New Latin "middle coat"), or media for short, is the middle tunica (layer) of an artery or vein.

Capillary

capillariessinusoidscapillary bed
The portal venous system is a series of veins or venules that directly connect two capillary beds.
The capillaries then join and widen to become venules, which in turn widen and converge to become veins, which then return blood back to the heart through the venae cavae.

Lung

lungspulmonaryright lung
The de-oxygenated blood is taken by veins to the right atrium of the heart, which transfers the blood to the right ventricle, where it is then pumped through the pulmonary arteries to the lungs.
The lungs filter out small blood clots from veins and prevent them from entering arteries and causing strokes.

Blood vessel

vascularblood vesselsintravascular
Veins are blood vessels that carry blood towards the heart.
There are five types of blood vessels: the arteries, which carry the blood away from the heart; the arterioles; the capillaries, where the exchange of water and chemicals between the blood and the tissues occurs; the venules; and the veins, which carry blood from the capillaries back towards the heart.

Coronary sinus

cardiac vein
Most of the blood of the coronary veins returns through the coronary sinus.
The coronary sinus is a collection of veins joined together to form a large vessel that collects blood from the heart muscle (myocardium).

Esophageal varices

oesophageal varicesvaricesdilated blood vessels in the esophagus
When the pressure increases in the portal veins, a collateral circulation develops, causing visible veins such as oesophageal varices.
Esophageal varices are extremely dilated sub-mucosal veins in the lower third of the esophagus.