A report on Veneto

Venice, the primary tourist destination and the capital of Veneto
Lake Alleghe near Belluno
Cortina d'Ampezzo
The Piave River
The Venetian Lagoon at sunset
Relief map of Veneto
The Adige in Verona
The Tetrarchs were the four co-rulers who governed the Roman Empire as long as Diocletian's reform lasted. Here they are portrayed embracing, in a posture of harmony, in a porphyry sculpture dating from the 4th century, produced in Anatolia, located today on a corner of St Mark's Basilica in Venice.
The Horses of Saint Mark, brought as loot from Constantinople in 1204.
An 18th-century view of Venice by Canaletto.
The 13th-century Castel Brando in Cison di Valmarino, Treviso.
Veneto's provinces.
St Mark's Basilica, the seat of the Patriarch of Venice.
The Punta San Vigilio on the Lake Garda
Kiss of Judas by Giotto, in Padua.
Giorgione's The Tempest.
The Prato della Valle in Padua, a work of Italian Renaissance architecture.
Villa Cornaro.
Antonio Canova's Psyche Revived by Love's Kiss.
The Church of Santa Maria della Salute in Venice
A Golden bottle of Prosecco
Asiago cheese and crackers
A slice of tiramisù
Antonio Salieri
Antonio Vivaldi
Teatro La Fenice
The Arena of Verona
Teatro Salieri
Villa Barbaro
The Villa Capra "La Rotonda"
Villa Badoer
Villa Malcontenta
Villa Pisani (Bagnolo)
The mount Antelao
Lastoi de Formin (Cadore)
The start of Strada delle 52 Gallerie
A trait that shows the structure of the Calà del Sasso

One of the 20 regions of Italy.

- Veneto

203 related topics with Alpha

Overall

Treviso

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Gate San Tomaso, with the Lion of Saint Mark, emblem of the Venetian Republic
A bridge on the Sile river in Treviso
Tiramisù, a typical dessert from Treviso.

Treviso (, ; Trevixo) is a city and comune in the Veneto region of northern Italy.

Austrian Uhlans charge Italian Bersaglieri during the Battle of Custoza. Painting by Juliusz Kossak

Third Italian War of Independence

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War between the Kingdom of Italy and the Austrian Empire fought between June and August 1866.

War between the Kingdom of Italy and the Austrian Empire fought between June and August 1866.

Austrian Uhlans charge Italian Bersaglieri during the Battle of Custoza. Painting by Juliusz Kossak
Allegory of Venice, represented by the lion, hoping to join Italy, represented by the woman
The naval Battle of Lissa, 20 July 1866
Battle of Bezzecca, 21 July 1866
Battle of Versa, 26 July 1866
Victor Emmanuel II in Venice

The conflict paralleled the Austro-Prussian War and resulted in Austria conceding the region of Venetia (present-day Veneto, Friuli and the city of Mantua, the last remnant of the Quadrilatero) to France, which were later annexed by Italy after a plebiscite.

Oderzo

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Remains of a Roman villa in the Roman Forum

Oderzo (Opitergium; Oderso) is a comune with a population of 20,003 in the province of Treviso, Veneto, northern Italy.

Brenta (river)

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The Brenta Canal (light green line, marked "Brenta Nova") between the rivers Brenta and Bacchiglione

The Brenta is an Italian river that runs from Trentino to the Adriatic Sea just south of the Venetian lagoon in the Veneto region, in the north-east of Italy.

Monte Gemola seen from Monte Rusta

Euganean Hills

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The Euganean Hills (Colli Euganei ) are a group of hills of volcanic origin that rise to heights of 300 to 600 m from the Padovan-Venetian plain a few km south of Padua.

The Euganean Hills (Colli Euganei ) are a group of hills of volcanic origin that rise to heights of 300 to 600 m from the Padovan-Venetian plain a few km south of Padua.

Monte Gemola seen from Monte Rusta

The Colli Euganei form the first Regional park established in the Veneto (1989), enclosing fifteen towns and eighty one hills.

Vittorio Veneto

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Vittorio Veneto City Hall
Serravalle
Serravalle middle ages square
Vittorio Veneto City Hall
De Negri distillery
Vittorio Veneto station

Vittorio Veneto is a city and comune situated in the Province of Treviso, in the region of Veneto, Italy, in the northeast of Italy, between the Piave and the Livenza rivers, borders with the following municipalities:

Kingdom of Italy (Napoleonic)

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Kingdom in Northern Italy (formerly the Italian Republic) in personal union with France under Napoleon I.

Kingdom in Northern Italy (formerly the Italian Republic) in personal union with France under Napoleon I.

Iron Crown of Lombardy
The Kingdom of Italy in 1807, with Istria and Dalmatia, shown in yellow
The Kingdom of Italy in 1811, shown in pink
40 lire coin of the<BR>Regno d'Italia (1808)
5 lire coin of the<BR>Regno d'Italia (1812)
The Kingdom of Italy in 1812, when it was extended from Bolzano to central Adriatic Italy (Marche), losing at the same time Istria and Dalmatia
The murder of finance minister Prina in Milan marked the effective end of the kingdom.
Napoleon I King of Italy 1805–1814
Eugène de Beauharnais Viceroy of Italy 1805–1814
Augusto Caffarelli Minister of War 1806–1810
Achille Fontanelli Minister of War 1811–1813
Ferdinando Marescalchi Minister of Foreign Affairs 1805–1814
Giuseppe Luosi Minister of Justice 1805–1814
Troop uniforms of the Kingdom of Italy, 1805–14
Military parade in 1812

It covered Savoy and the modern provinces of Lombardy, Veneto, Emilia-Romagna, Friuli Venezia Giulia, Trentino, South Tyrol, and Marche.

Extent of Etruscan civilisation and the twelve Etruscan League cities.

Etruscan civilization

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Extent of Etruscan civilisation and the twelve Etruscan League cities.
Biconical cinerary urn with crest-shaped helmet lid, 9th–8th century BC, from Monterozzi (Fontanaccia), Tarquinia, Museo archeologico nazionale
Urn in the shape of a hut, which represents the typical Etruscan house of the Villanovan phase, 8th century BC, from Vulci, Musée d'art et d'histoire de Genève
Etruscan pendant with swastika symbols from Bolsena, Italy, 700–650 BC. Louvre
Putto Graziani, hollow-cast bronze on which is engraved the Etruscan inscription "To the god Tec Sans as a gift" (Tec Sans was the protectress of childhood), 3-2nd century BC, Rome, Museo Gregoriano Etrusco
Sarcophagus of the Spouses, about 1st century BC, Volterra, Museo etrusco Guarnacci
Painted terracotta Sarcophagus of Seianti Hanunia Tlesnasa, about 150–130 BC.
Ethnic groups of Italy (as defined by today's borders) in 400 BC
Etruscan territories and major spread pathways of Etruscan products
The Mars of Todi, an Etruscan bronze sculpture, c. 400 BC
A former Etruscan walled town, Civita di Bagnoregio
The Capitoline Wolf, long considered an Etruscan bronze, feeding the twins Romulus and Remus
Etruscan mother and child, 500–450 BC
Sarcophagus of the Spouses, (Louvre, Room 18)
Etruscan warrior, found near Viterbo, Italy, dated c. undefined 500 BC
3D view, facing west, of the Etruscan Hypogeum of the Volumnis, Perugia, Italy, cut from a laser scan
5th century BC fresco of dancers and musicians, Tomb of the Leopards, Monterozzi necropolis, Tarquinia, Italy
Janiform kantharos, Etruscan pottery, second half of the 4th century BC.
Cippus Perusinus. 3rd–2nd century BC, San Marco near Perugia
Samples of Etruscan script, from the Liber linteus

The Etruscan civilization of ancient Italy covered a territory, at its greatest extent, of roughly what is now Tuscany, western Umbria, and northern Lazio, as well as what are now the Po Valley, Emilia-Romagna, south-eastern Lombardy, southern Veneto, and western Campania.

Adria

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Adria is a town and comune in the province of Rovigo in the Veneto region of northern Italy, situated between the mouths of the rivers Adige and Po.

Bacchiglione

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Route of the Rivers Bacchiglione, Brenta, and Muson.
1789 map

The Bacchiglione (Medoacus Minor, "Little Medoacus") is a river that flows in Veneto, northern Italy.