A report on Veneto

Venice, the primary tourist destination and the capital of Veneto
Lake Alleghe near Belluno
Cortina d'Ampezzo
The Piave River
The Venetian Lagoon at sunset
Relief map of Veneto
The Adige in Verona
The Tetrarchs were the four co-rulers who governed the Roman Empire as long as Diocletian's reform lasted. Here they are portrayed embracing, in a posture of harmony, in a porphyry sculpture dating from the 4th century, produced in Anatolia, located today on a corner of St Mark's Basilica in Venice.
The Horses of Saint Mark, brought as loot from Constantinople in 1204.
An 18th-century view of Venice by Canaletto.
The 13th-century Castel Brando in Cison di Valmarino, Treviso.
Veneto's provinces.
St Mark's Basilica, the seat of the Patriarch of Venice.
The Punta San Vigilio on the Lake Garda
Kiss of Judas by Giotto, in Padua.
Giorgione's The Tempest.
The Prato della Valle in Padua, a work of Italian Renaissance architecture.
Villa Cornaro.
Antonio Canova's Psyche Revived by Love's Kiss.
The Church of Santa Maria della Salute in Venice
A Golden bottle of Prosecco
Asiago cheese and crackers
A slice of tiramisù
Antonio Salieri
Antonio Vivaldi
Teatro La Fenice
The Arena of Verona
Teatro Salieri
Villa Barbaro
The Villa Capra "La Rotonda"
Villa Badoer
Villa Malcontenta
Villa Pisani (Bagnolo)
The mount Antelao
Lastoi de Formin (Cadore)
The start of Strada delle 52 Gallerie
A trait that shows the structure of the Calà del Sasso

One of the 20 regions of Italy.

- Veneto

203 related topics with Alpha

Overall

Venetian Independence

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Venetian Independence (Indipendenza Veneta, Independensa Vèneta, IV) is a Venetist, liberal and, to some extent, libertarian political party active in Veneto.

Liga Veneta

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Liga Veneta (Łiga Vèneta; Venetian League; abbr.

Liga Veneta (Łiga Vèneta; Venetian League; abbr.

Before 2018

LV), whose complete name is Liga Veneta per Salvini Premier (Venetian League for Salvini Premier), is a regionalist political party active in Veneto.

2020 Venetian regional election

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The 2020 Venetian regional election took place in Veneto on 20 and 21 September 2020.

Istria

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Largest peninsula within the Adriatic Sea.

Largest peninsula within the Adriatic Sea.

Borders and roads in Istria
The Sečovlje Saltworks in northern Istria were probably started in antiquity and were first mentioned in 804 in the report on Placitum of Riziano.
Austrian Littoral in 1897
Map of Istria and Dalmatia with the ancient domains of the Republic of Venice (indicated in fuchsia. Dashed diagonally, the territories that belonged occasionally)
Location map of Slovenian Istria
Percentage of native Italian speakers (Istrian Italians) in Croatia's Istria County in 2001
Percentage of people who used Italian as a "language of daily use" in Istria (Istrian Italians) in 1910
Aerial picture of Pula (Croatia)
The promenade of Poreč (Croatia)
Rovinj, as seen from the bell tower of the church of Saint Eufemia (Croatia)
Motovun (Croatia)
Lim canal (Croatia)
The Praetorian Palace in Koper (Slovenia)
Old town of Piran (Slovenia)
Port in Muggia (Italy)
Traditional folk costume of Istrian Croats
Vineyards of Istria
Changes to the Italian eastern border from 1920 to 1975.
The Austrian Littoral, later renamed Julian March, which was assigned to Italy in 1920 with the Treaty of Rapallo (with adjustments of its border in 1924 after the Treaty of Rome) and which was then ceded to Yugoslavia in 1947 with the Treaty of Paris
Areas annexed to Italy in 1920 and remained Italian even after 1947
Areas annexed to Italy in 1920, passed to the Free Territory of Trieste in 1947 with the Paris treaties and definitively assigned to Italy in 1975 with the Treaty of Osimo
Areas annexed to Italy in 1920, passed to the Free Territory of Trieste in 1947 with the Paris treaties and definitively assigned to Yugoslavia in 1975 with the Osimo treaty

However, after the Third Italian War of Independence (1866), when the Veneto and Friuli regions were ceded by the Austrians to the newly formed Kingdom Italy, Istria remained part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, together with other Italian-speaking areas on the eastern Adriatic.

Kingdom of Sardinia

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State in Southern Europe from the early 14th until the mid-19th century.

State in Southern Europe from the early 14th until the mid-19th century.

Kingdom of Piedmont-Sardinia in 1848.
The flag of the Kingdom of Sardinia at the funeral ceremony of Charles V
Kingdom of Piedmont-Sardinia in 1848.
The Kingdom of Sardinia in a 16th-century map
Kingdom of Piedmont-Sardinia in 1848.
The Savoyards' Italian possessions in the early 18th century.
19th-century coat of arms of the Kingdom of Sardinia under the Savoy dynasty
A map of the Kingdom of Sardinia in 1856, after the fusion of all its provinces into a single jurisdiction
Camillo Benso, Count of Cavour
King Victor Emmanuel II meets Garibaldi in Teano (26 October 1860)
Middle Ages
Imperial Eagle of Roman Holy Emperor Charles V with the four Moors of the Kingdom of Sardinia (16th century)
(1720–1815)
(1815–1831)
(1831–1848)
(1848–1861)
Flag of the Kingdom of Sardinia in 1568
Royal Standard of the Savoyard kings of Sardinia of Savoy dynasty (1720-1848) and State Flag of the Savoyard States (late 16th - late 18th century)
State Flag and War Ensign (1816–1848): Civil Flag "crowned"
State and war flag (1848–1851)
State flag and war ensign (1851–1861)
Merchant Flag (c.1799–1802)
War Ensign of the Royal Sardinian Navy (1785–1802)
Merchant Flag (1802–1814)
War Ensign (1802–1814)
Merchant Flag and War Ensign (1814–1816)
War Ensign of the Kingdom of Sardinia (1816–1848) aspect ratio 31:76
Civil and merchant flag (1851–1861), the Italian tricolore with the coat of arms of Savoy as an inescutcheon
(1848–1861) and Kingdom of Italy (1861–1880)
Crown Prince (1848–1861) and Crown Prince of the Kingdom of Italy (1861–1880)
The political situation in Sardinia after 1324 when the Aragonese conquered the Pisan territories of Sardinia, which included the defunct Judicate of Cagliari and Gallura.
The Kingdom of Sardinia from 1368 to 1388 and 1392 to 1409, after the wars with Arborea, consisted of only the cities of Cagliari and Alghero.
The Kingdom of Sardinia from 1410 to 1420, after the defeat of the Arborean Judicate in the Battle of Sanluri (1409).
The Kingdom of Sardinia from 1448 to 1720; the Maddalena archipelago was conquered in 1767–69.
1796
1859: {{legend|#ff8040|Kingdom of Sardinia}} {{legend|#0000ff|Kingdom Lombardy–Venetia}} {{legend|#00ff00|Duchies Parma–Modena-Tuscany}} {{legend|#fd0000|Papal States}} {{legend|#ffff00|Kingdom of the Two Sicilies}}
1860: {{legend|#ff8040|Kingdom of Sardinia}} {{legend|#0000ff|Kingdom Lombardy–Venetia}} {{legend|#fd0000|Papal States}} {{legend|#ffff00|Kingdom of the Two Sicilies}} After the annexation of Lombardy, the Grand Duchy of Tuscany, the Emilian Duchies and Pope's Romagna.
1861: {{legend|#ff8040|Kingdom of Sardinia}} {{legend|#0000ff|Kingdom Lombardy–Venetia}} {{legend|#d8241c|Papal States}} After the Expedition of the Thousand.
maximum expansion of the Kingdom of Sardinia, in 1860

There followed the annexation of Lombardy (1859), the central Italian states and the Two Sicilies (1860), Venetia (1866), and the Papal States (1870).

A bottle of Prosecco di Conegliano spumante extra dry and a glass of Prosecco frizzante, which stops forming bubbles soon after it is poured.

Prosecco

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A bottle of Prosecco di Conegliano spumante extra dry and a glass of Prosecco frizzante, which stops forming bubbles soon after it is poured.
The cover of the book Il Roccolo Ditirambo (1754) containing for the first time the exact word Prosecco.
The poem where the term Prosecco appears for the first time within Il Roccolo Ditirambo (1754).
Vineyards in the Prosecco region of origin (UNESCO)
Glera grapes on the vine in the Prosecco zone, pre-veraison.
Bottle of Prosecco showing the DOC designation on the label.
Prosecco valley, UNESCO World Heritage Site
Cheap Prosecco is also sold in cans.

Prosecco (Italian: ) is an Italian DOC or DOCG white wine produced in a large area spanning nine provinces in the Veneto and Friuli Venezia Giulia regions, and named after the village of Prosecco which is in the province of Trieste, Italy.

Regional Council of Veneto

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The Regional Council of Veneto (Consiglio Regionale del Veneto) is the regional parliament of Veneto.

North-East Project

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"Dignity. Autonomy for Veneto"

North-East Project (Progetto NordEst, PNE) is a Venetist, fiscal federalist and libertarian Italian political party based in Veneto, demanding larger autonomy, if not complete independence for the region.

Hohe Warte and Kellerspitzen, view from south (Monte Arvenis)

Carnic Alps

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The Carnic Alps (Alpi Carniche; Karnische Alpen; Karnijske Alpe; Alps Cjargnelis) are a range of the Southern Limestone Alps in Austria and northeastern Italy.

The Carnic Alps (Alpi Carniche; Karnische Alpen; Karnijske Alpe; Alps Cjargnelis) are a range of the Southern Limestone Alps in Austria and northeastern Italy.

Hohe Warte and Kellerspitzen, view from south (Monte Arvenis)
Wind turbine on the Austrian side of the Plöcken Pass

They are within Austrian East Tyrol and Carinthia, and Italian Friuli (Province of Udine) and marginally in Veneto.

Plebiscito.eu

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Plebiscito.eu, originally known as Plebiscite 2013 (Plebiscito 2013, P2013), is a supposedly cross-party nonpartisan committee that campaigns for the independence of Veneto from Italy.