A report on Veneto

Venice, the primary tourist destination and the capital of Veneto
Lake Alleghe near Belluno
Cortina d'Ampezzo
The Piave River
The Venetian Lagoon at sunset
Relief map of Veneto
The Adige in Verona
The Tetrarchs were the four co-rulers who governed the Roman Empire as long as Diocletian's reform lasted. Here they are portrayed embracing, in a posture of harmony, in a porphyry sculpture dating from the 4th century, produced in Anatolia, located today on a corner of St Mark's Basilica in Venice.
The Horses of Saint Mark, brought as loot from Constantinople in 1204.
An 18th-century view of Venice by Canaletto.
The 13th-century Castel Brando in Cison di Valmarino, Treviso.
Veneto's provinces.
St Mark's Basilica, the seat of the Patriarch of Venice.
The Punta San Vigilio on the Lake Garda
Kiss of Judas by Giotto, in Padua.
Giorgione's The Tempest.
The Prato della Valle in Padua, a work of Italian Renaissance architecture.
Villa Cornaro.
Antonio Canova's Psyche Revived by Love's Kiss.
The Church of Santa Maria della Salute in Venice
A Golden bottle of Prosecco
Asiago cheese and crackers
A slice of tiramisù
Antonio Salieri
Antonio Vivaldi
Teatro La Fenice
The Arena of Verona
Teatro Salieri
Villa Barbaro
The Villa Capra "La Rotonda"
Villa Badoer
Villa Malcontenta
Villa Pisani (Bagnolo)
The mount Antelao
Lastoi de Formin (Cadore)
The start of Strada delle 52 Gallerie
A trait that shows the structure of the Calà del Sasso

One of the 20 regions of Italy.

- Veneto

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Overall

Government of Veneto

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The Regional Government of Veneto (Giunta Regionale del Veneto) is the executive of Veneto, one of the twenty regions of Italy.

Adige

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Second-longest river in Italy, after the Po, rises in the Alps in the province of South Tyrol (Italian: Alto Adige "high Adige"), near the Italian border with Austria and Switzerland, and flows 410 km through most of northeastern Italy to the Adriatic Sea.

Second-longest river in Italy, after the Po, rises in the Alps in the province of South Tyrol (Italian: Alto Adige "high Adige"), near the Italian border with Austria and Switzerland, and flows 410 km through most of northeastern Italy to the Adriatic Sea.

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The true source of Adige inside a bunker of the Alpine Wall
The false source
Graun, the bell tower in the Reschensee.
The Adige between Laas and Göflan in the Vinschgau.
The Adige flowing through Lagarina Valley.
thumb|Adige canyon at Chiusa.
The Adige flowing through Verona.
The Adige flowing through Verona, as seen from the Castelvecchio Bridge.
The Adige flowing through Verona.
The Adige flowing through Verona seen from Castel San Pietro.
Adige river and Ponte Pietra in Verona.
The mouth of the Adige at Rosolina Mare

The Adige crosses Trentino and later Veneto, flowing past the town of Rovereto, the Lagarina Valley, the cities of Verona and Adria and the north-eastern part of the Po Plain into the Adriatic Sea.

Dalmatia

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One of the four historical regions of Croatia, alongside Croatia proper, Slavonia, and Istria.

One of the four historical regions of Croatia, alongside Croatia proper, Slavonia, and Istria.

The extent of the Kingdom of Dalmatia (blue) which existed within Austria-Hungary until 1918, on a map of modern-day Croatia and Montenegro
The ancient core of the city of Split, the largest city in Dalmatia, built in and around the Palace of Emperor Diocletian
Rocky beach at Brač island (Croatia), in the Adriatic Sea, during the summer
The historic core of the city of Dubrovnik, in southern Dalmatia
Province of Dalmatia during the Roman Empire
Late Roman provinces
Kingdom of Croatia during the rule of Peter Krešimir IV
Croatia after the Treaty of Zadar
An engraving of the seaward walls of the city of Split by Robert Adam, 1764. The walls were originally built for the Roman Diocletian's Palace.
Map of the Republic of Ragusa, dated 1678
Ottoman Bosnia at its peak territorial extent just before the Morean War in 1684
Dalmatian possessions of the Republic of Venice in 1797
Map of Dalmatia, Croatia, and Sclavonia (Slavonia). Engraved by Weller for the Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge under the Supervision of Charles Knight, dated January 1, 1852. Dalmatia is the area detailed in the smaller map annexed map on the right.
Austrian linguistic map from 1896. In green the areas where Slavs were the majority of the population, in orange the areas where Istrian Italians and Dalmatian Italians were the majority of the population. The boundaries of Venetian Dalmatia in 1797 are delimited with blue dots.
The Seagull Wings monument in Podgora, dedicated to the fallen sailors of the Yugoslav Partisan Navy

However, after 1866, when the Veneto and Friuli regions were ceded by the Austrians to the newly formed Kingdom Italy, Dalmatia remained part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, together with other Italian-speaking areas on the eastern Adriatic.

View of Torcello in a book published in Venice in 1534

Torcello

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Sparsely populated island at the northern end of the Venetian Lagoon, in north-eastern Italy.

Sparsely populated island at the northern end of the Venetian Lagoon, in north-eastern Italy.

View of Torcello in a book published in Venice in 1534
Central Torcello, with the Cathedral of Santa Maria Assunta and the Church of Santa Fosca
Facade of the cathedral.
Narthex of the cathedral.
Mosaic from the cathedral in the Louvre in Paris.
Sculpture of the Museo provinciale di Torcello.
Ponte del Diavolo
Torcello as seen from the Venetian lagoon
Venetian lagoon as seen from Torcello

Although the hard-fought Veneto region formally belonged to the Byzantine Exarchate of Ravenna since the end of the Gothic War, it remained unsafe on account of frequent Gothic (Sarmatian) invasions and wars: during the following 200 years the Lombards and the Franks fuelled a permanent influx of sophisticated urban refugees to the island’s relative safety, including the Bishop of Altino himself.

Negrar

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Mosaico Negrar
Panorama
vineyards
vineyards
Villa Mosconi Bertani and Amarone vineyards
Villa Rizzardi and Amarone vineyards

Negrar di Valpolicella is a comune (municipality) in the Province of Verona in the Italian region Veneto, about 110 km west of Venice and about 12 km northwest of Verona.

Villa Emo

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One of the many creations conceived by Italian Renaissance architect Andrea Palladio.

One of the many creations conceived by Italian Renaissance architect Andrea Palladio.

The main building (casa dominicale).
Another view of Villa Emo.
Frescoes by Giovanni Battista Zelotti, west wall of the hall
Hall West
Perspective view of the front grounds
Perspective view of the rear garden.

It is a patrician villa located in the Veneto region of northern Italy, near the village of Fanzolo di Vedelago, in the Province of Treviso.

John Paul I on 19 September 1978

Pope John Paul I

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Head of the Catholic Church and sovereign of the Vatican City from 26 August 1978 to his death 33 days later.

Head of the Catholic Church and sovereign of the Vatican City from 26 August 1978 to his death 33 days later.

John Paul I on 19 September 1978
Pope Paul VI makes Luciani a cardinal in 1973
Albino Luciani in 1969
John Paul I photographed from his study's window
Tomb of John Paul I in the Vatican Grottoes
1000 lire silver coin with a portrait of John Paul I on the front (1978)
The Pope Luciani museum.
Albino Luciani approximately at the age of 10, c. 1922-23

Albino Luciani was born on 17 October 1912 in Forno di Canale (now Canale d'Agordo) in Belluno, a province of the Veneto region in Northern Italy.

View from a bridge on Murano, overlooking the Canal Grande di Murano

Murano

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Series of islands linked by bridges in the Venetian Lagoon, northern Italy.

Series of islands linked by bridges in the Venetian Lagoon, northern Italy.

View from a bridge on Murano, overlooking the Canal Grande di Murano
Church of Santa Maria e San Donato, Murano
Glass making in Murano
Chandelier in Murano glass
Numerous tourists take a vaporetto from Venice to visit Murano
The seven individual islands of Murano
The eight channels separating the islands of Murano

Murano was initially settled by the Romans and from the sixth century by people from Altinum and Oderzo.

The Last Judgment in the Scrovegni Chapel

Scrovegni Chapel

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Older palace, also bought, and redecorated, by Enrico Scrovegni.

Older palace, also bought, and redecorated, by Enrico Scrovegni.

The Last Judgment in the Scrovegni Chapel
The exterior of the Scrovegni Chapel
Kiss of Judas, one of the panels in the Scrovegni Chapel
Cast of Giovanni Pisano's effigy of Enrico Scrovegni, in the chapel
Model of the interior of the chapel, towards entrance
Towards the apse and altar
Section of the wall, showing the setting of the narrative panels.
The scene of the Lamentation of Christ
The centre of the vault, with Madonna and Child as one of the two suns, and prophets as planets
Expulsion of the money changers from the temple
Infidelity
Justice
Last Judgment

]]The Scrovegni Chapel (Cappella degli Scrovegni ), also known as the Arena Chapel, is a small church, adjacent to the Augustinian monastery, the Monastero degli Eremitani in Padua, region of Veneto, Italy.

Vineyards in Soave, Veneto

Venetian wine

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Vineyards in Soave, Veneto
Prosecco Valley, UNESCO
Vineyards in Valpolicella

Venetian wine is produced in Veneto, a highly productive wine region in north-eastern Italy.