Venice

VenetianVenice, ItalyVeneziaVenetianssestiereVenedigsestieriVeniseItalyhistory of Venice
Venice (Venezia ; Venesia or Venexia, ) is a city in northeastern Italy and the capital of the Veneto region.wikipedia
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Veneto

VenetiaVenetianVeneto region
Venice (Venezia ; Venesia or Venexia, ) is a city in northeastern Italy and the capital of the Veneto region.
The region's capital is Venice.

Republic of Venice

VenetianVeniceVenetian Republic
The city was historically the capital of the Republic of Venice for a millennium and more, from 697 to 1797.
Centered on the lagoon communities of the prosperous city of Venice, the republic grew into a trading power during the Middle Ages and strengthened this position in the Renaissance.

Po (river)

PoPo RiverRiver Po
The islands are located in the shallow Venetian Lagoon, an enclosed bay that lies between the mouths of the Po and the Piave rivers (more exactly between the Brenta and the Sile).
The Po then extends along the 45th parallel north before ending at a delta projecting into the Adriatic Sea near Venice.

Antonio Vivaldi

VivaldiAntonio Lucio VivaldiA. Vivaldi
Venice is known for several important artistic movements—especially during the Renaissance period—has played an important role in the history of symphonic and operatic music, and is the birthplace of Antonio Vivaldi.
Born in Venice, the capital of the Venetian Republic, he is regarded as one of the greatest Baroque composers, and his influence during his lifetime was widespread across Europe.

Battle of Lepanto

LepantoBattle of Lepanto (1571)Battles of Lepanto
It was a major financial and maritime power during the Middle Ages and Renaissance, and a staging area for the Crusades and the Battle of Lepanto, as well as an important center of commerce—especially silk, grain, and spice, and of art from the 13th century to the end of the 17th.
The Spanish Empire and the Venetian Republic were the main powers of the coalition, as the league was largely financed by Philip II of Spain and Venice was the main contributor of ships.

Venetian language

VenetianVenetian dialectvec
The alternative obsolete form is Vinegia ; (Venetian: Venèxia ; ; Benetke; Venecija).
Venetian or Venetan (łéngoa vèneta or vèneto), is a Romance language spoken as a native language by Venetians, almost four million people in the northeast of Italy, mostly in the Veneto region of Italy, where most of the five million inhabitants can understand it, centered in and around Venice, which carries the prestige dialect.

Adriatic Sea

AdriaticAdriatic coastThe Adriatic
Venice has been known as "La Dominante", "La Serenissima", "Queen of the Adriatic", "City of Water", "City of Masks", "City of Bridges", "The Floating City", and "City of Canals".
The Adriatic's shores are populated by more than 3.5 million people; the largest cities are Bari, Venice, Trieste and Split.

Italian Renaissance

Renaissance ItalyRenaissanceFlorentine Renaissance
Venice is known for several important artistic movements—especially during the Renaissance period—has played an important role in the history of symphonic and operatic music, and is the birthplace of Antonio Vivaldi.
The Renaissance later spread to Venice, heart of a mediterranean empire and in control of the trade routes with the east since the participation in the crusades and the voyages of Marco Polo, where the remains of ancient Greek culture were brought together and provided humanist scholars with new texts.

Congress of Vienna

Vienna CongressTreaty of ViennaFinal Act of the Congress of Vienna
After the Napoleonic Wars and the Congress of Vienna, the Republic was annexed by the Austrian Empire, until it became part of the Kingdom of Italy in 1866, following a referendum held as a result of the Third Italian War of Independence.
Prussia added smaller German states in the west, Swedish Pomerania and 60% of the Kingdom of Saxony; Austria gained Venice and much of northern Italy.

Piave (river)

PiavePiave RiverPiave valley
The islands are located in the shallow Venetian Lagoon, an enclosed bay that lies between the mouths of the Po and the Piave rivers (more exactly between the Brenta and the Sile).
It begins in the Alps and flows southeast for 220 km into the Adriatic Sea near the city of Venice.

Rialto

The Rialto
The traditional founding is identified with the dedication of the first church, that of San Giacomo on the islet of Rialto (Rivoalto, "High Shore")—said to have taken place at the stroke of noon on 25 March 421 (the Feast of the Annunciation).
The Rialto is a central area of Venice, Italy, in the sestiere of San Polo.

Oderzo

Opitergiumbishop of Oderzodiocese of Oderzo
Beginning as early as AD 166–168, the Quadi and Marcomanni destroyed the main Roman town in the area, present-day Oderzo.
It lies in the heart of the Venetian plain, about 66 km to the northeast of Venice.

Renaissance

the RenaissanceEarly RenaissanceEuropean Renaissance
It was a major financial and maritime power during the Middle Ages and Renaissance, and a staging area for the Crusades and the Battle of Lepanto, as well as an important center of commerce—especially silk, grain, and spice, and of art from the 13th century to the end of the 17th.
Instead, it was divided into smaller city states and territories: the Kingdom of Naples controlled the south, the Republic of Florence and the Papal States at the center, the Milanese and the Genoese to the north and west respectively, and the Venetians to the east.

Lake Garda

GardaLago di GardaGarda Lake
Later mainland possessions, which extended across Lake Garda as far west as the Adda River, were known as the Terraferma; they were acquired partly as a buffer against belligerent neighbours, partly to guarantee Alpine trade routes, and partly to ensure the supply of mainland wheat (on which the city depended).
It is a popular holiday location in northern Italy, about halfway between Brescia and Verona, and between Venice and Milan on the edge of the Dolomites.

San Giacomo di Rialto

Church of San Giacomo di RialtoSan Giacomo
The traditional founding is identified with the dedication of the first church, that of San Giacomo on the islet of Rialto (Rivoalto, "High Shore")—said to have taken place at the stroke of noon on 25 March 421 (the Feast of the Annunciation).
San Giacomo di Rialto is a church in the sestiere of San Polo, Venice, northern Italy.

Bergamo

Bergamo, ItalyBergamasqueBergamese
By the standards of the time, Venice's stewardship of its mainland territories was relatively enlightened and the citizens of such towns as Bergamo, Brescia, and Verona rallied to the defence of Venetian sovereignty when it was threatened by invaders.
Bergamo is well connected to several cities in Italy, thanks to the motorway A4 stretching on the axis between Turin, Milan, Verona, Venice, and Trieste.

Treviso

Treviso, ItalyTarvisiumTrévise
Together with Padua and Treviso, the city is included in the Padua-Treviso-Venice Metropolitan Area (PATREVE), which is considered a statistical metropolitan area, with a total population of 2.6 million. Although no surviving historical records deal directly with the founding of Venice, tradition and the available evidence have led several historians to agree that the original population of Venice consisted of refugees—from nearby Roman cities such as Padua, Aquileia, Treviso, Altino, and Concordia (modern Portogruaro), as well as from the undefended countryside—who were fleeing successive waves of Germanic and Hun invasions.
People from the city also played a role in the founding of Venice.

Marino Sanuto the Younger

Marin SanudoMarino SanudoMarino Sanuto
Supposed connections of Venetia with the Latin verb venire (to come), such as Marin Sanudo's veni etiam ("Yet, I have come!"), the supposed cry of the first refugees to the Venetian lagoon from the mainland, or even with venia ("forgiveness") are fanciful.
His most significant work is his Diarii, which he had intended to write up into a history of Venice.

Altinum

AltinoAltino (Quarto d'Altino)
Although no surviving historical records deal directly with the founding of Venice, tradition and the available evidence have led several historians to agree that the original population of Venice consisted of refugees—from nearby Roman cities such as Padua, Aquileia, Treviso, Altino, and Concordia (modern Portogruaro), as well as from the undefended countryside—who were fleeing successive waves of Germanic and Hun invasions.
Located at the mouth of the river Silis, it was first destroyed by Attila in 452 and gradually abandoned by its inhabitants, who sought refuge in the islands of the lagoon, such as Torcello and Burano, in the area where later Venice would be built.

Venetian Ghetto

ghettoGhetto of Venicethe Jewish community
He removed the gates of the Ghetto and ended the restrictions on when and where Jews could live and travel in the city.
The Venetian Ghetto was the area of Venice in which Jews were compelled to live by the government of the Venetian Republic.

Padua–Treviso–Venice metropolitan area

Padua-Treviso-Venice Metropolitan Area
Together with Padua and Treviso, the city is included in the Padua-Treviso-Venice Metropolitan Area (PATREVE), which is considered a statistical metropolitan area, with a total population of 2.6 million.
The Padua–Treviso–Venice metropolitan area (PaTreVe) or Venice city–region is the urban agglomeration centred on the cities of Padova, Treviso, and Venice in the Veneto region of northeast Italy.

Brenta (river)

BrentaBrenta RiverVal Brenta
The islands are located in the shallow Venetian Lagoon, an enclosed bay that lies between the mouths of the Po and the Piave rivers (more exactly between the Brenta and the Sile).
A branch of the Brenta, named Naviglio del Brenta, was left to connect directly Venice and Padua (which was a kind of second capital of the Venice Republic).

Aldus Manutius

Aldo ManuzioAldusManutius
the leading printer was Aldus Manutius, who invented paperback books that could be carried in a saddlebag.
In his late thirties or early forties Manutius settled in Venice to become a print publisher.

Italy

ItalianITAItalia
Venice (Venezia ; Venesia or Venexia, ) is a city in northeastern Italy and the capital of the Veneto region.
Many watercourses and coastal stretches have also been contaminated by industrial and agricultural activity, while because of rising water levels, Venice has been regularly flooded throughout recent years.

Triveneto

Venetia et HistriaTre VenezieNorth East
The name of the city, deriving from Latin forms Venetia and Venetiae, is most likely taken from "Venetia et Histria", the Roman name of Regio X of Roman Italy, but applied to the coastal part of the region that remained under Roman Empire outside of Gothic, Lombard, and Frankish control.
Nowadays the name Triveneto is more commonly used in the Northern Italian dialects, while its original title is still in use in the Neapolitan Language and Southern Italian dialects, and it includes the three Italian regions of Veneto, Friuli-Venezia Giulia and Trentino-Alto Adige/Südtirol: that is to say, the provinces of Belluno, Bolzano, Gorizia, Padua, Pordenone, Rovigo, Trento, Treviso, Trieste, Udine, Venice, Verona, and Vicenza.