Ventricle (heart)

ventricleleft ventricleright ventricleventriclesventricularleft ventricularright ventricularventricular functionrightventricular pressure
A ventricle is one of two large chambers toward the bottom of the heart that collect and expel blood received from an atrium towards the peripheral beds within the body and lungs.wikipedia
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Blood

human bloodhematologicalblood-forming
A ventricle is one of two large chambers toward the bottom of the heart that collect and expel blood received from an atrium towards the peripheral beds within the body and lungs.
In humans, blood is pumped from the strong left ventricle of the heart through arteries to peripheral tissues and returns to the right atrium of the heart through veins.

Aorta

aorticaortic archaortic root
In a four-chambered heart, such as that in humans, there are two ventricles that operate in a double circulatory system: the right ventricle pumps blood into the pulmonary circulation to the lungs, and the left ventricle pumps blood into the systemic circulation through the aorta. The left ventricle receives oxygenated blood from the left atrium via the mitral valve and pumps it through the aorta via the aortic valve, into the systemic circulation. During most of the cardiac cycle, ventricular pressure is less than the pressure in the aorta, but during systole, the ventricular pressure rapidly increases, and the two pressures become equal to each other (represented by the junction of the blue and red lines on the diagram on this page), the aortic valve opens, and blood is pumped to the body.
The aorta is the main artery in the human body, originating from the left ventricle of the heart and extending down to the abdomen, where it splits into two smaller arteries (the common iliac arteries).

Pulmonary circulation

pulmonary vesselspulmonary circuitalveolar capillaries
In a four-chambered heart, such as that in humans, there are two ventricles that operate in a double circulatory system: the right ventricle pumps blood into the pulmonary circulation to the lungs, and the left ventricle pumps blood into the systemic circulation through the aorta.
From the right atrium, the blood is pumped through the tricuspid valve (or right atrioventricular valve), into the right ventricle.

Trabeculae carneae

On the inner walls of the ventricles are irregular muscular columns called trabeculae carneae which cover all of the inner ventricular surfaces except that of the conus arteriosus, in the right ventricle.
The trabeculae carneae (columnae carneae, or meaty ridges), are rounded or irregular muscular columns which project from the inner surface of the right ventricle of the heart.

Circulatory system

cardiovascularcirculationcardiovascular system
In a four-chambered heart, such as that in humans, there are two ventricles that operate in a double circulatory system: the right ventricle pumps blood into the pulmonary circulation to the lungs, and the left ventricle pumps blood into the systemic circulation through the aorta.
Oxygenated blood enters the systemic circulation when leaving the left ventricle, through the aortic semilunar valve.

Infundibulum (heart)

conus arteriosusinfundibuluminfundibular
On the inner walls of the ventricles are irregular muscular columns called trabeculae carneae which cover all of the inner ventricular surfaces except that of the conus arteriosus, in the right ventricle.
The infundibulum (also known as conus arteriosus) is a conical pouch formed from the upper and left angle of the right ventricle in the chordate heart, from which the pulmonary trunk arises.

Tricuspid valve

tricuspidtricuspid valvesheart
The third type, the papillary muscles give origin at their apices to the chordae tendinae which attach to the cusps of the tricuspid valve and to the mitral valve. The right ventricle receives deoxygenated blood from the right atrium via the tricuspid valve and pumps it into the pulmonary artery via the pulmonary valve, into the pulmonary circulation.
The tricuspid valve, or right atrioventricular valve, is on the right dorsal side of the mammalian heart, between the right atrium and the right ventricle.

Mitral valve

mitralbicuspid valvemitral annulus
The third type, the papillary muscles give origin at their apices to the chordae tendinae which attach to the cusps of the tricuspid valve and to the mitral valve. The left ventricle receives oxygenated blood from the left atrium via the mitral valve and pumps it through the aorta via the aortic valve, into the systemic circulation.
The mitral valve, also known as the bicuspid valve or left atrioventricular valve, is a valve with two flaps in the heart, that lies between the left atrium and the left ventricle.

Heart

cardiachuman heartapex of the heart
A ventricle is one of two large chambers toward the bottom of the heart that collect and expel blood received from an atrium towards the peripheral beds within the body and lungs.
In humans, other mammals, and birds, the heart is divided into four chambers: upper left and right atria; and lower left and right ventricles.

Interventricular septum

ventricular septumseptumseptal
Interventricular means between the ventricles (for example the interventricular septum), while intraventricular means within one ventricle (for example an intraventricular block).
The interventricular septum (IVS, or ventricular septum, or during development septum inferius), is the stout wall separating the ventricles, the lower chambers of the heart, from one another.

Systole

systolicsystolic pressureventricular systole
During systole, the ventricles contract, pumping blood through the body. During most of the cardiac cycle, ventricular pressure is less than the pressure in the aorta, but during systole, the ventricular pressure rapidly increases, and the two pressures become equal to each other (represented by the junction of the blue and red lines on the diagram on this page), the aortic valve opens, and blood is pumped to the body.
The mammalian heart has four chambers: the left atrium above the left ventricle (lighter pink, see graphic), which two are connected through the mitral (or bicuspid) valve; and the right atrium above the right ventricle (lighter blue), connected through the tricuspid valve.

Atrium (heart)

right atriumatrialeft atrium
A ventricle is one of two large chambers toward the bottom of the heart that collect and expel blood received from an atrium towards the peripheral beds within the body and lungs. The left ventricle receives oxygenated blood from the left atrium via the mitral valve and pumps it through the aorta via the aortic valve, into the systemic circulation.
The atria receive blood, and when the heart muscle contracts they pump blood to the ventricles.

Diastole

diastolicdiastolic pressurerelaxation
During diastole, the ventricles relax and fill with blood again.
Ventricular diastole is the period during which the two ventricles are relaxing from the contortions of contraction, then dilating and filling; atrial diastole is the period during which the two atria likewise are relaxing, dilating, and filling.

Aortic valve

aorticaortic valvesaortic semilunar valve
The left ventricle receives oxygenated blood from the left atrium via the mitral valve and pumps it through the aorta via the aortic valve, into the systemic circulation. During most of the cardiac cycle, ventricular pressure is less than the pressure in the aorta, but during systole, the ventricular pressure rapidly increases, and the two pressures become equal to each other (represented by the junction of the blue and red lines on the diagram on this page), the aortic valve opens, and blood is pumped to the body.
The aortic valve is a valve in the human heart between the left ventricle and the aorta.

End-systolic volume

end systolic volumeend-systolic
In cardiology, the performance of the ventricles are measured with several volumetric parameters, including end-diastolic volume (EDV), end-systolic volume (ESV), stroke volume (SV) and ejection fraction (E f ).
End-systolic volume (ESV) is the volume of blood in a ventricle at the end of contraction, or systole, and the beginning of filling, or diastole.

Pulmonary valve

pulmonic valvepulmonarypulmonary (or pulmonic) valve
The right ventricle receives deoxygenated blood from the right atrium via the tricuspid valve and pumps it into the pulmonary artery via the pulmonary valve, into the pulmonary circulation.
The pulmonary valve (sometimes referred to as the pulmonic valve) is the semilunar valve of the heart that lies between the right ventricle and the pulmonary artery and has three cusps.

Aortic stenosis

aortic valve stenosisAorticstenosis
An elevated pressure difference between the aortic pressure and the left ventricular pressure may be indicative of aortic stenosis.
Aortic stenosis (AS or AoS) is the narrowing of the exit of the left ventricle of the heart (where the aorta begins), such that problems result.

Stroke volume

heart muscle contraction forcestroke workstroke work (SW).
In cardiology, the performance of the ventricles are measured with several volumetric parameters, including end-diastolic volume (EDV), end-systolic volume (ESV), stroke volume (SV) and ejection fraction (E f ).
In cardiovascular physiology, stroke volume (SV) is the volume of blood pumped from the left ventricle per beat.

Cardiac cycle

heartbeatheart beatventricular systole
During most of the cardiac cycle, ventricular pressure is less than the pressure in the aorta, but during systole, the ventricular pressure rapidly increases, and the two pressures become equal to each other (represented by the junction of the blue and red lines on the diagram on this page), the aortic valve opens, and blood is pumped to the body.
There are two atrial and two ventricle chambers of the heart; they are paired as the left heart and the right heart—that is, the left atrium with the left ventricle, the right atrium with the right ventricle—and they work in concert to repeat the cardiac cycle continuously, (see cycle diagram at right margin).

Cardiology

cardiologistcardiologistscardiovascular medicine
In cardiology, the performance of the ventricles are measured with several volumetric parameters, including end-diastolic volume (EDV), end-systolic volume (ESV), stroke volume (SV) and ejection fraction (E f ).
As the center focus of cardiology, the heart has numerous anatomical features (e.g., atria, ventricles, heart valves) and numerous physiological features (e.g., systole, heart sounds, afterload) that have been encyclopedically documented for many centuries.

Ejection fraction

left ventricular ejection fractionejectedinjection fraction
In cardiology, the performance of the ventricles are measured with several volumetric parameters, including end-diastolic volume (EDV), end-systolic volume (ESV), stroke volume (SV) and ejection fraction (E f ).
It can refer to the cardiac atrium, ventricle, gall bladder, or leg veins, although if unspecified it usually refers to the left ventricle of the heart.

Medical ultrasound

ultrasoundultrasonographysonogram
This is not as informative as volumes but may be much easier to estimate with (e.g., M-Mode echocardiography or with sonomicrometry, which is mostly used for animal model research).
(ventricle and atrium)

Chordae tendineae

chordae tendinaetendon of Todarochord
The third type, the papillary muscles give origin at their apices to the chordae tendinae which attach to the cusps of the tricuspid valve and to the mitral valve.
When the ventricles of the heart contract in ventricular systole, the increased blood pressures in both chambers push the AV valves to close simultaneously, preventing backflow of blood into the atria.

Purkinje fibers

purkinjePurkinje fibresthe cardiac conduction system
Normally the heartbeat is initiated in the SA node of the atrium but initiation can also occur in the Purkinje fibres of the ventricles, giving rise to premature ventricular contractions, also called ventricular extra beats.
The Purkinje fibres (Purkinje tissue or subendocardial branches) are located in the inner ventricular walls of the heart, just beneath the endocardium in a space called the subendocardium.

Papillary muscle

papillary muscles
The third type, the papillary muscles give origin at their apices to the chordae tendinae which attach to the cusps of the tricuspid valve and to the mitral valve.