Vermont

The Old Constitution House at Windsor, where the Constitution of Vermont was adopted on July 8, 1777
A circa 1775 flag used by the Green Mountain Boys
The gold leaf dome of the neoclassical Vermont State House (Capitol) in Montpelier
1791 Act of Congress admitting Vermont into the Union
Vermont in 1827. The county boundaries have since changed.
Map of Vermont showing cities, roads, and rivers
Population density of Vermont
Mount Mansfield
Western face of Camel's Hump Mountain (elevation 4079 ft).
Fall foliage at Lake Willoughby
Köppen climate types of Vermont, using 1991–2020 climate normals.
Silurian and Devonian stratigraphy of Vermont
The hermit thrush, the state bird of Vermont
A proportional representation of Vermont exports, 2020
Fall foliage seen from Hogback Mountain, Wilmington
Lake Champlain
Autumn in Vermont
Stowe Resort Village
The Lyndon Institute, a high school in Lyndon, Vermont
The University of Vermont
Old Mill, the oldest building of the university
Vermont welcome sign in Addison on Route 17 just over the New York border over the Champlain Bridge
Amtrak station in White River Junction
The Vermont Yankee Nuclear Power Plant, in Vernon
The Vermont Supreme Court's building in Montpelier
Vermont towns hold a March town meeting for voters to approve the town's budget and decide other matters. Marlboro voters meet in this building.
Senators Bernie Sanders and Patrick Leahy and Representative Peter Welch greet supporters in 2017.
Vermontasaurus sculpture in Post Mills, in 2010

State in the New England region of the United States.

- Vermont

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Quebec

One of the thirteen provinces and territories of Canada.

A depiction of Jacques Cartier by Théophile Hamel, 1844
Three Huron-Wyandot chiefs from Wendake. New France had largely peaceful relations with the Indigenous people, such as their allies the Huron. After the defeat of the Huron by their mutual enemy, the Iroquois, many fled from Ontario to Quebec.
Montcalm leading his troops into battle. Watercolour by Charles William Jefferys.
The Province of Quebec in 1774
The Battle of Saint-Eustache was the final battle of the Lower Canada Rebellion.
George-Étienne Cartier, creator of the Quebec state and premier of Canada East
Maurice Duplessis, premier of Quebec from 1936 to 1939 and during the Grande Noirceur
"Maîtres chez nous" was the electoral slogan of the Liberal Party during the 1962 election.
René Lévesque, one of the architects of the Quiet Revolution, and the Premier of Quebec's first modern sovereignist government
Map of Quebec
Michel's falls on Ashuapmushuan River in Saint-Félicien, Saguenay–Lac-Saint-Jean
Köppen climate types of Quebec
Baie-Saint-Paul during winter
The Parliament Building in Quebec City
The seventeen administrative regions of Quebec.
The Édifice Ernest-Cormier is the courthouse for the Quebec Court of Appeal in Montreal
The Basilica of Sainte-Anne-de-Beaupré
Map of aboriginal communities in Quebec, this includes reserves, settlements and northern villages.
The Institut national de la recherche scientifique helps to advance scientific knowledge and to train a new generation of students in various scientific and technological sectors.
Quebec's exports to the international market. The United States is the country which buys the most Québécois exports by far. (2011)
The Beauharnois generating station, operated by Hydro-Québec
A mockup of the Airbus A220 (formerly the Bombardier CSeries), originally developed by Bombardier Aerospace
The Château Frontenac is the most photographed hotel in the world.
In 1969, Héroux-Devtek designed and manufactured the undercarriage of the Apollo Lunar Module.
The ferry N.M. Camille-Marcoux, of the Société des traversiers du Québec
The show Dralion, Cirque du Soleil, introduced in 2004
La chasse-galerie (1906) by Henri Julien, showing a scene from a popular Quebec folk legend.
La Cavalière by Charles Daudelin, 1963, installed in front of the pavilion Gérard Morisset of the Quebec National Museum of Fine Arts in Quebec City
Maison Routhier in Sainte-Foy. This kind of Canadien-style house remains a symbol of Canadien nationalism.
A classic poutine from La Banquise in Montreal
The Montreal Canadiens at the Bell Centre
St-Jean-Baptiste Day celebrations at Maisonneuve park in Montréal
The Fleurdelisé flying at Place d'Armes in Montreal
Canada in the 18th century.
The Province of Quebec from 1763 to 1783.
Lower Canada from 1791 to 1841. (Patriots' War in 1837, Canada East in 1841)
Quebec from 1867 to 1927.
Quebec today. Quebec (in blue) has a border dispute with Labrador (in red).

Located in Central Canada, the province shares land borders with Ontario to the west, Newfoundland and Labrador to the northeast, New Brunswick to the southeast, and a coastal border with Nunavut; in the south it borders Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, and New York in the United States.

Abenaki

Indigenous peoples of the Northeastern Woodlands of Canada and the United States.

<center>Western Abenaki (Arsigantegok, Missisquoi, Cowasuck, Sokoki, Pennacook)</center>
<center>Eastern Abenaki (Penobscot, Kennebec, Arosaguntacook, Pigwacket/Pequawket)</center>
Abenaki teepee with birch bark covering.
Flag of Missisquoi Abenaki Tribe, a state-recognized tribe in Vermont
Statue of Keewakwa Abenaki Keenahbeh in Opechee Park in Laconia, New Hampshire (standing at 36 ft.)
<center>Miꞌkmaq</center>
<center>Maliseet,

The Eastern Abenaki language was predominantly spoken in Maine, while the Western Abenaki language was spoken in Quebec, Vermont, and New Hampshire.

Mohawk people

The Mohawk people are the most easterly section of the Haudenosaunee, or Iroquois Confederacy.

Map of Mohawk River
Kanienʼkehá:ka dancer at a pow wow in 2015
Contemporary Quebec Kanienʼkehá꞉ka dance performance at Wikimania 2017
Teyoninhokovrawen (John Norton) played a prominent role in the War of 1812, leading Iroquois warriors from Grand River into battle against Americans. Norton was part Cherokee and part Scottish.
Pauline Johnson, Mohawk writer

Their territory ranged north to the St. Lawrence River, southern Quebec and eastern Ontario; south to greater New Jersey and into Pennsylvania; eastward to the Green Mountains of Vermont; and westward to the border with the Iroquoian Oneida Nation's traditional homeland territory.

Green Mountains

Green Mountains looking south from Jay Peak
Jay Peak, located at the northern end of the Green Mountains in Vermont
Green Mountains outside of Montpelier, Vermont
Map of the main regions of the northern Appalachians

The Green Mountains are a mountain range in the U.S. state of Vermont.

Vermont Republic

Independent state in New England that existed from January 15, 1777, to March 4, 1791.

Location of the Vermont Republic in 1777.
Vellum manuscript of the 1777 Constitution of Vermont
Location of the Vermont Republic in 1777.
Vermont coin with the passage VERMONTIS. RES. PUBLICA. on the obverse, and the motto "STELLA QUARTA DECIMA" on the reverse
Engraving of Thomas Chittenden, first and third governor of the Vermont Republic, and first governor of the State of Vermont with the most gubernatorial terms held to date
The Old Constitution House in Windsor, Vermont, where the 1777 constitution was signed, is also called the birthplace of Vermont.
The "Old Chapel" (Castleton Medical College Building) in Castleton

On March 4, 1791, it was admitted into the United States as the State of Vermont, with the constitution and laws of the independent state continuing in effect after admission.

Lake Champlain

Lake Champlain-River Richelieu watershed
Sentinel-2 satellite photo
Lake Champlain in Burlington Harbor during sunset on May 27, 2012
Brooklyn Museum – Green Mountains, Lake Champlain – Winckworth Allan Gay – overall
Map of Lac Champlain, from Fort de Chambly up to Fort St-Fréderic in Nouvelle France. Cadastral map showing concessions and seigneuries on the coasts of the lake according to 1739 surveying.
Charlotte Ferry, Lake Champlain
The Champlain Valley as seen from Camel's Hump
Lake Champlain, Charlotte, Vermont
Dutton House, Shelburne Museum
Stagecoach Inn, Shelburne Museum
Sawmill, Shelburne Museum
A 1902 photograph of Fort Henry at Lake Champlain
The Champlain Bridge between New York and Vermont, demolished in December 2009
The LCTC ferry slip at Grand Isle, Vermont
The Swanton-Alburgh trestle spans Lake Champlain between the two Vermont towns: a distance of about 0.8 mi.
At sunset, looking west from Grand Isle to Plattsburgh and Crab Island
The lighthouse in Lake Champlain at dusk, as seen from Burlington, VT
USCG, Burlington, Vermont – main installation
Vermont Department of Fish and Wildlife boat docked near ECHO Aquarium

Lake Champlain (Lac Champlain; Abenaki: Pitawbagw ["At Lake Champlain" (loc.):Pitawbagok]; ) is a natural freshwater lake in North America mainly within the borders of the United States (in the states of Vermont and New York) but also across the Canada–U.S. border into the Canadian province of Quebec.

Province of New York

British proprietary colony and later royal colony on the northeast coast of North America.

Map of the Province of New York
The Van Bergen farm, 1733, near Albany, New York
Map of the Province of New York

When the English arrived, the Dutch colony somewhat vaguely included claims to all of the present U.S. states of New York, New Jersey, Delaware and Vermont, along with inland portions of Connecticut, Massachusetts and Maine in addition to eastern Pennsylvania.

Connecticut River

Longest river in the New England region of the United States, flowing roughly southward for 406 mi through four states.

View of Springfield on the Connecticut River by Alvan Fisher (Brooklyn Museum)
View of the City of Hartford, Connecticut by William Havell
View from Mount Holyoke, Northampton, Massachusetts, after a Thunderstorm—The Oxbow (1836) by Thomas Cole
The Memorial Bridge across the Connecticut River at Springfield, Massachusetts, the river's largest city
The Windsor Locks Canal Company at Enfield Falls, the Connecticut River's first major barrier to navigation
The Oxbow, Connecticut River, circa 1910
Downtown Hartford, Connecticut, during the 1936 flood
The Connecticut Lakes, the source of the Connecticut River, near the border of New Hampshire and Quebec
Great Falls (Bellows Falls) at high flow under the Vilas Bridge, taken from the end of Bridge St on the Vermont side, looking upriver
Satellite image of the Connecticut River depositing silt into Long Island Sound
Drift boat fishing guide working the river near Colebrook, New Hampshire
Harbor seal in the Connecticut River, below the Holyoke Dam, following the shad run
Riverbank restoration project in Fairlee, Vermont
Near First Connecticut Lake
Near Colebrook, New Hampshire
Looking north from the French King Bridge at the Erving-Gill town line in western Massachusetts
Mist upstream of the Bissell Bridge between Windsor and South Windsor, CT
Founders Bridge in Hartford, with a view of the Bulkeley Bridge upstream
The river near its mouth

The region stretching from Springfield north to the New Hampshire and Vermont state borders fostered many agricultural Pocomtuc and Nipmuc settlements, with its soil enhanced by sedimentary deposits.

Province of New Hampshire

Colony of England and later a British province in North America.

Map of the province
Topographical map of the province
Map of the province

These disputes resulted in the eventual formation of the Vermont Republic and the US state of Vermont.

Green Mountain Boys

The Flag of the Green Mountain Boys, predating the Vermont Republic, is still used by the Vermont National Guard
Replica of the 1777 flag from the Battle of Bennington.

The Green Mountain Boys were a militia organization first established in 1770 in the territory between the British provinces of New York and New Hampshire, known as the New Hampshire Grants and later in 1777 as the Vermont Republic (which later became the state of Vermont).