A report on Vermont

The Old Constitution House at Windsor, where the Constitution of Vermont was adopted on July 8, 1777
A circa 1775 flag used by the Green Mountain Boys
The gold leaf dome of the neoclassical Vermont State House (Capitol) in Montpelier
1791 Act of Congress admitting Vermont into the Union
Vermont in 1827. The county boundaries have since changed.
Map of Vermont showing cities, roads, and rivers
Population density of Vermont
Mount Mansfield
Western face of Camel's Hump Mountain (elevation 4079 ft).
Fall foliage at Lake Willoughby
Köppen climate types of Vermont, using 1991–2020 climate normals.
Silurian and Devonian stratigraphy of Vermont
The hermit thrush, the state bird of Vermont
A proportional representation of Vermont exports, 2020
Fall foliage seen from Hogback Mountain, Wilmington
Lake Champlain
Autumn in Vermont
Stowe Resort Village
The Lyndon Institute, a high school in Lyndon, Vermont
The University of Vermont
Old Mill, the oldest building of the university
Vermont welcome sign in Addison on Route 17 just over the New York border over the Champlain Bridge
Amtrak station in White River Junction
The Vermont Yankee Nuclear Power Plant, in Vernon
The Vermont Supreme Court's building in Montpelier
Vermont towns hold a March town meeting for voters to approve the town's budget and decide other matters. Marlboro voters meet in this building.
Senators Bernie Sanders and Patrick Leahy and Representative Peter Welch greet supporters in 2017.
Vermontasaurus sculpture in Post Mills, in 2010

State in the New England region of the United States.

- Vermont

251 related topics with Alpha

Overall

Middlebury, Vermont

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Main Street in 1908
Lithograph of Middlebury from 1886 by L.R. Burleigh with list of landmarks
Middlebury College campus
Main Street, Middlebury
Porter Medical Center
Otter Creek Falls

Middlebury is the shire town (county seat) of Addison County, Vermont, United States.

Bloomfield, Vermont

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Bloomfield is a town in Essex County, Vermont, United States.

Landsat photo of the immediate Lake Champlain region—only part of the much longer drainage basin and overall valley which reaches the Atlantic Ocean north of Nova Scotia via the St. Lawrence Seaway.

Champlain Valley

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Landsat photo of the immediate Lake Champlain region—only part of the much longer drainage basin and overall valley which reaches the Atlantic Ocean north of Nova Scotia via the St. Lawrence Seaway.

The Champlain Valley is a region of the United States around Lake Champlain in Vermont and New York extending north slightly into Quebec, Canada.

Current composition of justices.

Essex County, Vermont

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Current composition of justices.

Essex County is a county located in the northeastern part of the U.S. state of Vermont.

Approaching VT 100B on VT 100 in Moretown

Vermont Route 100

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Approaching VT 100B on VT 100 in Moretown

Vermont Route 100 (VT 100) is a north–south state highway in Vermont in the United States.

Collection box for the Massachusetts Anti-Slavery Society, circa 1850.

Abolitionism in the United States

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Active from the late colonial era until the American Civil War, the end of which brought about the abolition of American slavery through the Thirteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution .

Active from the late colonial era until the American Civil War, the end of which brought about the abolition of American slavery through the Thirteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution .

Collection box for the Massachusetts Anti-Slavery Society, circa 1850.
Thones Kunders's house at 5109 Germantown Avenue, where the 1688 Germantown Quaker Petition Against Slavery was written.
Samuel Sewall (1652–1730), judge who wrote The Selling of Joseph (1700) which denounced the spread of slavery in the American colonies.
Benjamin Kent, lawyer that freed a slave in America (1766)
Thomas Paine's 1775 article "African Slavery in America" was one of the first to advocate abolishing slavery and freeing slaves.
An animation showing when states and territories forbade or admitted slavery 1789–1861
Wm. Lloyd Garrison (1805–1879), publisher of the abolitionist newspaper The Liberator and one of the founders of the American Anti-Slavery Society.
Wood engraving of proslavery riot in Alton, Illinois, on 7 November 1837, which resulted in the murder of abolitionist Elijah Parish Lovejoy (1802–1837).
Lysander Spooner (1808–1887), an individualist anarchist who wrote The Unconstitutionality of Slavery (1845).
Idealized portrait of John Brown being adored by an enslaved mother and child as he walks to his execution.
Frederick Douglass (1818–1895), a former slave whose memoirs, Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave (1845) and My Bondage and My Freedom (1855), became bestsellers, which aided the cause of abolition.
Charles Turner Torrey, c. 1840, from Memoir of Rev. Charles T. Torrey, Joseph P. Lovejoy, ed. (Boston: John P. Jewett & Co.), 1847
Uncle Tom's Cabin inflamed public opinion in the North and Europe against the personified evils of slavery.
This Democratic editorial cartoon links Republican candidate John Frémont (far right) to temperance, feminism, Fourierism, free love, Catholicism, and abolition.
John Brown (1800–1859), abolitionist who advocated armed rebellion by slaves. He slaughtered pro-slavery settlers in Kansas and in 1859 was hanged by the state of Virginia for leading an unsuccessful slave insurrection at Harpers Ferry.
This photo of Gordon was widely distributed by abolitionists.
Wilson Chinn, a branded slave from Louisiana--became one of the most widely circulated photos of the abolitionist movement during the American Civil War
John Jay (1745–1829), a founder of the New York Manumission Society in 1785
This anti-slavery map shows the slave states in black, with black-and-white shading representing the threatened spread of slavery into Texas and the western territories.
Officers and men of the Irish-Catholic 69th New York Volunteer Regiment attend Catholic services in 1861.
Like many Quakers, Lucretia Mott considered slavery an evil to be opposed.
Plaque commemorating the founding of the Female Anti-Slavery Society in Philadelphia in 1833
Burning of Pennsylvania Hall, home of the Pennsylvania Anti-Slavery Society. Print by John Caspar Wild. Note firemen spraying water on adjacent building.
Henry Clay (1777–1852), one of the three founders of the American Colonization Society.
Abolition of slavery in the various states of the US over time:Abolition of slavery during or shortly after the American Revolution
The Northwest Ordinance, 1787
Gradual emancipation in New York (starting 1799) and New Jersey (starting 1804)
The Missouri Compromise, 1821
Effective abolition of slavery by Mexican or joint US/British authority
Abolition of slavery by Congressional action, 1861
Abolition of slavery by Congressional action, 1862ff.
Emancipation Proclamation as originally issued, 1 Jan 1863
Subsequent operation of the Emancipation Proclamation in 1863
Abolition of slavery by state action during the Civil War
Operation of the Emancipation Proclamation in 1864
Operation of the Emancipation Proclamation in 1865
Thirteenth Amendment to the US constitution, 18 Dec 1865
Territory incorporated into the US after the passage of the Thirteenth Amendment

In 1777, independent Vermont, not yet a state, became the first polity in North America to prohibit slavery: slaves were not directly freed, but masters were required to remove slaves from Vermont.

History of slavery in Vermont

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Among the first places to abolish slavery by constitutional dictum.

Among the first places to abolish slavery by constitutional dictum.

Although estimates place the number of enslaved persons at 25 in 1770 slavery was banned outright upon the founding of Vermont in July 1777, and by a further provision in its Constitution, existing male slaves become free at the age of 21 and females at the age of 18.

Governor Thomas Chittenden (presumed likeness)

Thomas Chittenden

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Major figure in the early history of Vermont, and was leader of the territory for nearly two decades.

Major figure in the early history of Vermont, and was leader of the territory for nearly two decades.

Governor Thomas Chittenden (presumed likeness)

Chittenden was the first and third governor of the state of Vermont, serving from 1778 to 1789, when Vermont was a largely unrecognized independent state, called the Vermont Republic, and again after a year out of office, from 1790 until his death.

Addison, Vermont

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The West Addison Methodist Church is located at the West Addison village center.

Addison is a town in Addison County, Vermont, United States.

Model of Fort Saint-Frédéric

Fort Saint-Frédéric

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French fort built on Lake Champlain to secure the region against British colonization and control the lake.

French fort built on Lake Champlain to secure the region against British colonization and control the lake.

Model of Fort Saint-Frédéric
Ruins of Fort Saint Frédéric

It was located in modern New York State across the lake from modern Vermont at the town of Crown Point, New York.