A report on Vermont

The Old Constitution House at Windsor, where the Constitution of Vermont was adopted on July 8, 1777
A circa 1775 flag used by the Green Mountain Boys
The gold leaf dome of the neoclassical Vermont State House (Capitol) in Montpelier
1791 Act of Congress admitting Vermont into the Union
Vermont in 1827. The county boundaries have since changed.
Map of Vermont showing cities, roads, and rivers
Population density of Vermont
Mount Mansfield
Western face of Camel's Hump Mountain (elevation 4079 ft).
Fall foliage at Lake Willoughby
Köppen climate types of Vermont, using 1991–2020 climate normals.
Silurian and Devonian stratigraphy of Vermont
The hermit thrush, the state bird of Vermont
A proportional representation of Vermont exports, 2020
Fall foliage seen from Hogback Mountain, Wilmington
Lake Champlain
Autumn in Vermont
Stowe Resort Village
The Lyndon Institute, a high school in Lyndon, Vermont
The University of Vermont
Old Mill, the oldest building of the university
Vermont welcome sign in Addison on Route 17 just over the New York border over the Champlain Bridge
Amtrak station in White River Junction
The Vermont Yankee Nuclear Power Plant, in Vernon
The Vermont Supreme Court's building in Montpelier
Vermont towns hold a March town meeting for voters to approve the town's budget and decide other matters. Marlboro voters meet in this building.
Senators Bernie Sanders and Patrick Leahy and Representative Peter Welch greet supporters in 2017.
Vermontasaurus sculpture in Post Mills, in 2010

State in the New England region of the United States.

- Vermont

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A 1780 map depicting the troop positions at the start of the battle

Battle of Bennington

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Battle of the American Revolutionary War, part of the Saratoga campaign, that took place on August 16, 1777, in Walloomsac, New York, about 10 mi from its namesake, Bennington, Vermont.

Battle of the American Revolutionary War, part of the Saratoga campaign, that took place on August 16, 1777, in Walloomsac, New York, about 10 mi from its namesake, Bennington, Vermont.

A 1780 map depicting the troop positions at the start of the battle
General John Stark
An early 20th-century map depicting the battlefield
Battle of Bennington, c. 1900
The Bennington flag was long incorrectly believed to have flown during the battle.
The Bennington Battle Monument in Bennington, Vermont
150th anniversary of Battle of Bennington commemorative stamp
Historic Marker marking the Bennington Battlefield Park

A rebel force of 2,000 men, primarily New Hampshire and Massachusetts militiamen, led by General John Stark, and reinforced by Vermont militiamen led by Colonel Seth Warner and members of the Green Mountain Boys, decisively defeated a detachment of General John Burgoyne's army led by Lieutenant Colonel Friedrich Baum, and supported by additional men under Lieutenant Colonel Heinrich von Breymann.

Original-style Vermont US 7 shield with embossed features

U.S. Route 7

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Original-style Vermont US 7 shield with embossed features
Westward view of Lake Champlain from US 7 in Charlotte, Vermont
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U.S. Route 7 (US 7) is a north–south United States highway in western New England that runs for 308 mi through the states of Connecticut, Massachusetts, and Vermont.

Windsor County, Vermont

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Windsor County is a county located in the U.S. state of Vermont.

White River Junction, Vermont

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White River Junction in 1889
Lillian Gish in Way Down East
North Main Street c. 1908
White River Junction in 1915

White River Junction is an unincorporated village and census-designated place (CDP) in the town of Hartford in Windsor County, Vermont, United States.

Northern Vermont University-Johnson Library and Learning Center

Lamoille County, Vermont

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Northern Vermont University-Johnson Library and Learning Center

Lamoille County is a county located in the U.S. state of Vermont.

Bottled maple syrup

Maple syrup

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Syrup usually made from the xylem sap of sugar maple, red maple, or black maple trees, although it can also be made from other maple species.

Syrup usually made from the xylem sap of sugar maple, red maple, or black maple trees, although it can also be made from other maple species.

Bottled maple syrup
A sugar maple tree
"Sugar-Making Among the Indians in the North" (19th-century illustration)
Sugar Making in Montreal, October 1852
A bucket used to collect sap, built circa 1820
Two taps in a maple tree, using plastic tubing for sap collection
Traditional bucket tap and a plastic-bag tap
Pouring the sap
A "sugar shack" where sap is boiling.
Regions of maple syrup production in Southeastern Canada and the Northeastern United-States according to the Maple Syrup Producers' Association of Ontario.
Old US maple syrup grades, left to right: Grade A Light Amber ("Fancy"), Grade A Medium Amber, Grade A Dark Amber, Grade B
The motif on the flag of Canada is a maple leaf.

Maple syrup is graded according to the Canada, United States, or Vermont scales based on its density and translucency.

Lake Memphremagog

Lake Memphremagog

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Fresh water glacial lake located between Newport, Vermont, United States and Magog, Quebec, Canada.

Fresh water glacial lake located between Newport, Vermont, United States and Magog, Quebec, Canada.

Lake Memphremagog
1901 map of Lake Memphremagog
Saint-Benoît-du-Lac Abbey is located in the village of Saint-Benoît-du-Lac, Quebec. The village is on the western shore of Lake Memphremagog.
The small city of Magog, Quebec

However, three-quarters of its watershed, 489 sqmi, is in Vermont.

New England–Acadian forests

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The New England-Acadian forests are a temperate broadleaf and mixed forest ecoregion in North America that includes a variety of habitats on the hills, mountains and plateaus of New England and New York State in the Northeastern United States, and Quebec and the Maritime Provinces of Eastern Canada.

The New England-Acadian forests are a temperate broadleaf and mixed forest ecoregion in North America that includes a variety of habitats on the hills, mountains and plateaus of New England and New York State in the Northeastern United States, and Quebec and the Maritime Provinces of Eastern Canada.

In Canada, the New England-Acadian forests ecoregion includes the Eastern Townships and Beauce regions of southern Quebec, half of New Brunswick and most of Nova Scotia, and in the United States, the North Country of New York State, northwestern Connecticut, northwestern Massachusetts, Lake Champlain and the Champlain Valley of Vermont, and the uplands and coastal plain of New Hampshire, and almost all of Maine.

Wilmington, Vermont

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Main Street Wilmington, 1914
October 2009 fall foliage seen from Hogback Mountain
Snowfall amount exceeding yardstick in Vermont record snowstorm. 54 in in a single blizzard. Wilmington, Vt. 2010.

Wilmington is a town in Windham County, Vermont, United States.

Alpine tundra grasses at the summit of Camel's Hump, Vermont, June 2008.

Camel's Hump

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Alpine tundra grasses at the summit of Camel's Hump, Vermont, June 2008.
The Vermont state quarter depicts Camel's Hump and Maple trees with sap buckets
Summit marker on Camel's Hump. Notice the inscription reads "Camels Rump"
Western face of Camel's Hump Mountain from South Burlington, Vermont.
Southward view from the summit of Camel's Hump (with Mt. Ethan Allen in the immediate foreground), September 2017.
View east from old fire tower atop Poke-O-Moonshine Mountain in Chesterfield, NY: 2008
Painting of Camel's Hump by John Frederick Kensett, 1852, oil on canvas.
Eastern face of Camel's Hump taken in 1968
Postcard of eastern face of Camel's Hump
Postcard of western face of Camel's Hump
A view of Camel's Hump from the Allis Trail to the southeast

Camel's Hump (alternatively Camels Hump) is a mountain in the Green Mountains in the U.S. state of Vermont.