Version 7 Unix

Seventh Edition UnixVersion 7Unix v77th EditionV7V7 UNIXUNIX Time-Sharing System v77th Ed. UNIXEdition 7Edition 7 Unix
Seventh Edition Unix, also called Version 7 Unix, Version 7 or just V7, was an important early release of the Unix operating system.wikipedia
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Xenix

SCO XenixMS-XenixTrusted Xenix
The first Sun workstations (then based on the Motorola 68010) ran a V7 port by UniSoft; the first version of Xenix for the Intel 8086 was derived from V7 and Onyx Systems soon produced a Zilog Z8000 computer running V7.
Microsoft, which expected that UNIX would be its operating system of the future when personal computers became powerful enough, purchased a license for Version 7 UNIX from AT&T in 1978, and announced on August 25, 1980, that it would make it available for the 16-bit microcomputer market.

UNIX/32V

32/V32V
The VAX port of V7, called UNIX/32V, was the direct ancestor of the popular 4BSD family of Unix systems.
32V was a direct port of the Seventh Edition Unix to the DEC VAX architecture.

Version 6 Unix

Sixth Edition Unix6th EditionSixth Edition
Released in 1979, the Seventh Edition was preceded by Sixth Edition, which was the first version licensed to commercial users.
It was superseded by Version 7 Unix in 1978/1979, although V6 systems remained in regular operation until at least 1985.

Research Unix

Version 10 UnixVersion 5 UnixVersion 3 Unix
Development of the Research Unix line continued with the Eighth Edition, which incorporated development from 4.1BSD, through the Tenth Edition, after which the Bell Labs researchers concentrated on developing Plan 9.

Ultrix

DEC ULTRIXDEC RISC ULTRIXUltrix-32
UEG evolved into the group that later developed Ultrix.
Under Canter's direction, UEG released V7M, a modified version of Unix 7th Edition (q.v.).

UniSoft

The first Sun workstations (then based on the Motorola 68010) ran a V7 port by UniSoft; the first version of Xenix for the Intel 8086 was derived from V7 and Onyx Systems soon produced a Zilog Z8000 computer running V7.
UniSoft's port of Version 7 Unix was the first operating system for Sun Microsystems' Sun-1 workstations and servers.

PDP-11

LSI-11PDP-11/70DEC PDP-11
V7 was originally developed for Digital Equipment Corporation's PDP-11 minicomputers and was later ported to other platforms.

Sun Microsystems

SunSun Microsystems, Inc.Sun workstation
The first Sun workstations (then based on the Motorola 68010) ran a V7 port by UniSoft; the first version of Xenix for the Intel 8086 was derived from V7 and Onyx Systems soon produced a Zilog Z8000 computer running V7.
Sun's first workstation shipped with UniSoft V7 Unix.

Onyx Systems

OnyxOnyx Computer
The first Sun workstations (then based on the Motorola 68010) ran a V7 port by UniSoft; the first version of Xenix for the Intel 8086 was derived from V7 and Onyx Systems soon produced a Zilog Z8000 computer running V7.
Its $20,000 price was half the cost of any other computer capable of running the operating system, and included Bell Labs' Version 7 Unix.

Bourne shell

shBourneshell
The Bourne shell was the default shell for Version 7 Unix.

Portable C Compiler

pcc
The Portable C Compiler (pcc) was provided along with the earlier, PDP-11-specific, C compiler by Ritchie.
It debuted in Seventh Edition Unix and shipped with BSD Unix until the release of 4.4BSD in 1994, when it was replaced by the GNU C Compiler.

Fortune (Unix)

fortuneUnix fortune program
is a program that displays a pseudorandom message from a database of quotations that first appeared in Version 7 Unix.

Tar (computing)

tartarballtarballs
The command line utility was first introduced in the Version 7 Unix in January 1979, replacing the tp program.

Chroot

chroot jailchroot "jailsChroot jails
The chroot system call was introduced during development of Version 7 Unix in 1979, and added to BSD by Bill Joy on 18 March 1982 – 17 months before 4.2BSD was released – in order to test its installation and build system.

Ioctl

system call Input/Output Control
The system call first appeared in Version 7 of Unix under that name.

Lint (software)

lintlintinglinter
*Programming tools: lex, lint, and make.
In 1979, lint was used outside of Bell Labs for the first time in the seventh version (V7) of the Unix operating system.

Environment variable

environmentSETpseudo-environment variable
They were introduced in their modern form in 1979 with Version 7 Unix, so are included in all Unix operating system flavors and variants from that point onward including Linux and macOS.

AWK

AWK programming languagegawk
As one of the early tools to appear in Version 7 Unix, AWK added computational features to a Unix pipeline besides the Bourne shell, the only scripting language available in a standard Unix environment.

PWB/UNIX

Programmer's WorkbenchProgrammer's Workbench UNIXProgrammer's Workbench (PWB/UNIX)
PWB/UNIX 1.0, released July 1, 1977 was based on Version 6 Unix; PWB 2.0 was based on Version 7 Unix.

UUCP

bang pathUUCPNETUUCP Mapping Project
It was released in 1979 as part of Version 7 Unix.

C file input/output

stdioC standard I/O librarystdio.h
The functionality descends from a "portable I/O package" written by Mike Lesk at Bell Labs in the early 1970s, and officially became part of the Unix operating system in Version 7.

Seventh Edition Unix terminal interface

The Seventh Edition Unix terminal interface is the generalized abstraction, comprising both an Application Programming Interface for programs and a set of behavioural expectations for users, of a terminal as historically available in Seventh Edition Unix.

CB UNIX

Mpx files were considered experimental, not enabled in the default kernel, and disappeared from later versions, which offered sockets (BSD) or CB UNIX's IPC facilities (System V) instead (although mpx files were still present in 4.1BSD ).
It was developed at the Columbus, Ohio branch, based on V6, V7 and PWB Unix.

Unix

UNIX operating systemAT&T UnixUnix-like
Seventh Edition Unix, also called Version 7 Unix, Version 7 or just V7, was an important early release of the Unix operating system.