Very Large Array

VLAEVLAD. S. HeeschenExpanded Very Large ArrayKarl G. Jansky Very Large ArrayNRAO Very Large ArraySocorroVery Large Array Radio TelescopeVLA radio observatoryVLA Radio Telescopes
The Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) is a centimeter-wavelength radio astronomy observatory located in central New Mexico on the Plains of San Agustin, between the towns of Magdalena and Datil, ~50 miles (80 km) west of Socorro.wikipedia
206 Related Articles

Magdalena, New Mexico

MagdalenaKelly
The Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) is a centimeter-wavelength radio astronomy observatory located in central New Mexico on the Plains of San Agustin, between the towns of Magdalena and Datil, ~50 miles (80 km) west of Socorro.
The Very Large Array lies 24 miles due west of the community.

Observatory

astronomical observatoryobservatoriesastronomical observatories
The Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) is a centimeter-wavelength radio astronomy observatory located in central New Mexico on the Plains of San Agustin, between the towns of Magdalena and Datil, ~50 miles (80 km) west of Socorro.
Some of the world's major radio observatories include the Socorro, in New Mexico, United States, Jodrell Bank in the UK, Arecibo in Puerto Rico, Parkes in New South Wales, Australia, and Chajnantor in Chile.

Datil, New Mexico

DatilDatil, NM
The Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) is a centimeter-wavelength radio astronomy observatory located in central New Mexico on the Plains of San Agustin, between the towns of Magdalena and Datil, ~50 miles (80 km) west of Socorro.
The Very Large Array is also nearby.

Astronomical interferometer

astronomical interferometryinterferometerinterferometry
The VLA comprises twenty-seven 25-meter radio telescopes deployed in a Y-shaped array and all the equipment, instrumentation, and computing power to function as an interferometer.
For the next three decades astronomical interferometry research was dominated by research at radio wavelengths, leading to the development of large instruments such as the Very Large Array and the Atacama Large Millimeter Array.

U.S. Route 60 in New Mexico

U.S. Route 60US 60U.S. Highway 60
Using the rail tracks that follow each of these arms—and that, at one point, intersect with U.S. Route 60 at a level crossing—and a specially designed lifting locomotive ("Hein's Trein"), the antennas can be physically relocated to a number of prepared positions, allowing aperture synthesis interferometry with up to 351 independent baselines: in essence, the array acts as a single antenna with a variable diameter.
The road bisects the Very Large Array complex and a track used in rearranging the antennas that make up the Array crosses the highway.

Aperture synthesis

aperture synthesis imagingsynthetic apertureinterferometric imaging
Using the rail tracks that follow each of these arms—and that, at one point, intersect with U.S. Route 60 at a level crossing—and a specially designed lifting locomotive ("Hein's Trein"), the antennas can be physically relocated to a number of prepared positions, allowing aperture synthesis interferometry with up to 351 independent baselines: in essence, the array acts as a single antenna with a variable diameter.
For example, the Very Large Array has 27 telescopes giving 351 independent baselines at once, and can give high quality images.

Socorro, New Mexico

SocorroSeccorroSocorro, NM
The Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) is a centimeter-wavelength radio astronomy observatory located in central New Mexico on the Plains of San Agustin, between the towns of Magdalena and Datil, ~50 miles (80 km) west of Socorro.
National Radio Astronomy Observatory Very Large Array

Radio astronomy

radio astronomerradioradioastronomy
The Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) is a centimeter-wavelength radio astronomy observatory located in central New Mexico on the Plains of San Agustin, between the towns of Magdalena and Datil, ~50 miles (80 km) west of Socorro.
For example, the Very Large Array has 27 telescopes giving 351 independent baselines at once.

Plains of San Agustin

San Agustin Plains
The Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) is a centimeter-wavelength radio astronomy observatory located in central New Mexico on the Plains of San Agustin, between the towns of Magdalena and Datil, ~50 miles (80 km) west of Socorro.
The plains are probably best known as the site of the Very Large Array, a radio astronomy observatory.

Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-Centimeters

FIRST
It has been used to carry out several large surveys of radio sources, including the NRAO VLA Sky Survey and Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-Centimeters.
Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-Centimeters, or FIRST, was an astronomical survey of the Northern Hemisphere carried out by the Very Large Array.

Radio telescope

radio telescopesradiotelescoperadio-telescope
The radio telescope comprises 27 independent antennas, each of which has a dish diameter of 25 meters (82 feet) and weighs 209 metric tons (230 Short tons).
For example, the Very Large Array (VLA) near Socorro, New Mexico has 27 telescopes with 351 independent baselines at once, which achieves a resolution of 0.2 arc seconds at 3 cm wavelengths.

Associated Universities, Inc.

Associated Universities, Inc
The NRAO is a facility of the National Science Foundation operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc.
The Very Large Array (VLA), an array of 27 25-meter antennas, is located on the Plains of San Agustin about 50 miles west of Socorro, New Mexico.

NRAO VLA Sky Survey

NVSSNVSS J033259+543444
It has been used to carry out several large surveys of radio sources, including the NRAO VLA Sky Survey and Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-Centimeters.
The NRAO VLA Sky Survey (NVSS) was an astronomical survey of the Northern Hemisphere carried out by the Very Large Array (VLA) of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO), resulting in an astronomical catalogue.

New Mexico

NMNew MexicanState of New Mexico
A second phase of this upgrade may add up to eight additional dishes in other parts of the state of New Mexico, up to 300 km away, if funded.
Astronomical observatories in New Mexico take advantage of unusually clear skies, including the Apache Point Observatory, the Very Large Array, the Magdalena Ridge Observatory, and others.

Contact (1997 American film)

Contactfilm of the same nameContact'' (1997 American film)
The VLA is present in the 1997 movie Contact, as the location where the alien signal is first detected.
Arroway gains backing from secretive billionaire industrialist S. R. Hadden's company, which allows her to continue the project at the Very Large Array (VLA) in New Mexico.

Karl Guthe Jansky

Karl JanskyKarl G. JanskyJansky
To reflect this increased capacity, VLA officials asked for input from both the scientific community and the public in coming up with a new name for the array, and in January 2012 it was announced that the array would be renamed the "Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array".
On January 10, 2012, the NRAO announced the Very Large Array (VLA), the radio telescope in Magdalena, New Mexico, would be renamed the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array in honor of Karl Jansky's contribution to Radio Astronomy.

Very Long Baseline Array

VLBAVery Long Baseline Array (VLBA)United States Very Long Baseline Array
The DSOC also serves as the control center for the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA), a VLBI array of ten 25-meter dishes located from Hawaii in the west to the U.S. Virgin Islands in the east that constitutes the world's largest dedicated, full-time astronomical instrument.
The use of the VLBA can be scheduled dynamically, and its sensitivity can be improved by a factor of five by including other radio telescopes such as the Arecibo radio telescope in Puerto Rico, the Green Bank Telescope in West Virginia, the Very Large Array (VLA) in New Mexico and the Effelsberg radio telescope in Germany.

List of members of the National Academy of Sciences (Astronomy)

David S. Heeschen
The driving force for the development of the VLA was David S. Heeschen.

G.I. Joe: America's Elite

Storm Shadoweponymous seriesG.I. Joe: Storm Shadow
The VLA features in plans to save the world from satellites being pulled from orbit in the second volume of the comic book series G.I. Joe: America's Elite (2005-2008).
They discover the attacks were made possible by Destro's M.A.R.S. operation, and call in Firewall to help retrofit the VLA in New Mexico, in order to counter the tractor beam that is pulling the satellites out of orbit.

Allen Telescope Array

ATA
Allen Telescope Array (ATA)
The area of sky which can be instantaneously imaged is 17 times that obtainable by the Very Large Array telescope.

Interferometry

interferometerinterferometricoptical interferometry
Using the rail tracks that follow each of these arms—and that, at one point, intersect with U.S. Route 60 at a level crossing—and a specially designed lifting locomotive ("Hein's Trein"), the antennas can be physically relocated to a number of prepared positions, allowing aperture synthesis interferometry with up to 351 independent baselines: in essence, the array acts as a single antenna with a variable diameter.
Later astronomical interferometers, such as the Very Large Array illustrated in Fig 11, used arrays of telescopes arranged in a pattern on the ground.

Green Bank Telescope

Green BankGreen Bank ObservatoryGreen Bank Radio Telescope
Green Bank Telescope (GBT)
The high-sensitivity mapping capability of the GBT makes it a necessary complement to the Atacama Large Millimeter Array, the Expanded Very Large Array, the Very Long Baseline Array, and other high-angular resolution interferometers.

2010: The Year We Make Contact

2010a motion picture in 1984film
The VLA is present in the 1984 movie 2010: The Year We Make Contact, as the location where Dr. Floyd and Dimitri Moiseyevich discuss the upcoming missions to Jupiter.
The majority of the film was shot on MGM's soundstages in Culver City, California, with the exception of a week of location work in Washington, D.C., Rancho Palos Verdes, California, and at the Very Large Array in New Mexico.

Atacama Large Millimeter Array

ALMAAtacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array (ALMA)Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array
Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA)
The antennas can be moved across the desert plateau over distances from 150 m to 16 km, which will give ALMA a powerful variable "zoom", similar in its concept to that employed at the centimetre-wavelength Very Large Array (VLA) site in New Mexico, United States.

National Radio Astronomy Observatory

SocorroNRAOJansky Lectureship
It is a component of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO).
Located on the New Mexico Tech university campus, the AOC serves as the headquarters for the Very Large Array (VLA), which was the setting for the 1997 movie Contact, and is also the control center for the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA).