Very high frequency

VHFVHF radioVHF bandultra-short waveultra-short-waveVery high freq.1½-metre wavelength200 MHz94.3 MHzIII
Very high frequency (VHF) is the ITU designation for the range of radio frequency electromagnetic waves (radio waves) from 30 to 300 megahertz (MHz), with corresponding wavelengths of ten meters to one meter.wikipedia
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Ultra high frequency

UHFUHF bandultra-high frequency
Frequencies immediately below VHF are denoted high frequency (HF), and the next higher frequencies are known as ultra high frequency (UHF).
Lower frequency signals fall into the VHF (very high frequency) or lower bands.

High frequency

HFhigh-frequencyHF radio
Frequencies immediately below VHF are denoted high frequency (HF), and the next higher frequencies are known as ultra high frequency (UHF). Radio waves in the VHF band propagate mainly by line-of-sight and ground-bounce paths; unlike in the HF band there is only some reflection at lower frequencies from the ionosphere (skywave propagation).
Frequencies immediately below HF are denoted medium frequency (MF), while the next band of higher frequencies is known as the very high frequency (VHF) band.

VHF omnidirectional range

VORDVORVHF omni-directional range
Air traffic control communications and air navigation systems (e.g. VOR & ILS) work at distances of 100 km or more to aircraft at cruising altitude.
It uses frequencies in the very high frequency (VHF) band from 108.00 to 117.95 MHz.

Radio modem

Common uses for radio waves in the VHF band are digital audio broadcasting (DAB) and FM radio broadcasting, television broadcasting, two way land mobile radio systems (emergency, business, private use and military), long range data communication up to several tens of kilometers with radio modems, amateur radio, and marine communications.
In most cases users use licensed frequencies either in the UHF or VHF bands.

Television

TVtelevisedtelevisions
Common uses for radio waves in the VHF band are digital audio broadcasting (DAB) and FM radio broadcasting, television broadcasting, two way land mobile radio systems (emergency, business, private use and military), long range data communication up to several tens of kilometers with radio modems, amateur radio, and marine communications.
In 1932, he demonstrated ultra-short wave television.

Band I

low-VHFlow bandlow-band
In the Americas and many other parts of the world, VHF Band I was used for the transmission of analog television. Until 2013, the four main Free-to-Air TV stations in New Zealand used the VHF Television bands (Band I and Band III) to transmit to New Zealand households.
Band I is a range of radio frequencies within the very high frequency (VHF) part of the electromagnetic spectrum.

Analog television

analoganalogueanalogue television
In the Americas and many other parts of the world, VHF Band I was used for the transmission of analog television.
The colors in those systems are encoded with one of three color coding schemes: NTSC, PAL, or SECAM, and then use RF modulation to modulate this signal onto a very high frequency (VHF) or ultra high frequency (UHF) carrier.

Marine VHF radio

marine radioVHF radioVHF
Common uses for radio waves in the VHF band are digital audio broadcasting (DAB) and FM radio broadcasting, television broadcasting, two way land mobile radio systems (emergency, business, private use and military), long range data communication up to several tens of kilometers with radio modems, amateur radio, and marine communications. The VHF band is the first band at which efficient transmitting antennas are small enough that they can be mounted on vehicles and portable devices, so the band is used for two-way land mobile radio systems, such as walkie-talkies, and two way radio communication with aircraft (Airband) and ships (marine radio).
The "VHF" signifies the very high frequency of the range.

Airband

VHF radioaircraft bandaviation
The VHF band is the first band at which efficient transmitting antennas are small enough that they can be mounted on vehicles and portable devices, so the band is used for two-way land mobile radio systems, such as walkie-talkies, and two way radio communication with aircraft (Airband) and ships (marine radio).
Airband or aircraft band is the name for a group of frequencies in the VHF radio spectrum allocated to radio communication in civil aviation, sometimes also referred to as VHF, or phonetically as "Victor".

Skywave

ionospheric reflectionsky waveionospheric propagation
Radio waves in the VHF band propagate mainly by line-of-sight and ground-bounce paths; unlike in the HF band there is only some reflection at lower frequencies from the ionosphere (skywave propagation).
As a result of skywave propagation, a signal from a distant AM broadcasting station, a shortwave station, or – during sporadic E propagation conditions (principally during the summer months in both hemispheres) a distant VHF FM or TV station – can sometimes be received as clearly as local stations.

Land mobile radio system

Land Mobile RadioPrivate Land Mobile Radioland-mobile radio
Common uses for radio waves in the VHF band are digital audio broadcasting (DAB) and FM radio broadcasting, television broadcasting, two way land mobile radio systems (emergency, business, private use and military), long range data communication up to several tens of kilometers with radio modems, amateur radio, and marine communications. The VHF band is the first band at which efficient transmitting antennas are small enough that they can be mounted on vehicles and portable devices, so the band is used for two-way land mobile radio systems, such as walkie-talkies, and two way radio communication with aircraft (Airband) and ships (marine radio).
They use channels in the VHF or UHF bands giving them a limited range, usually 3 to 20 miles depending on terrain, although repeaters installed on tall buildings, hills or mountain peaks can be used to increase the coverage area.

Digital television transition

digital switchoveranalog shutdowntransition
As part of the worldwide transition to digital terrestrial television most countries require broadcasters to air television in the VHF range using digital rather than analog format.
This date was generally viewed as an internationally mandated analog switch-off date, at least along national borders - except for those operating on the VHF band which would be allowed until 17 June 2020.

Radio frequency

RFradio frequenciesradio-frequency
Very high frequency (VHF) is the ITU designation for the range of radio frequency electromagnetic waves (radio waves) from 30 to 300 megahertz (MHz), with corresponding wavelengths of ten meters to one meter.

Tropospheric propagation

tropospheric ductingtroposphericducting
Occasionally, when conditions are right, VHF waves can travel long distances by tropospheric ducting due to refraction by temperature gradients in the atmosphere.
The inversion is capable of allowing very high frequency (VHF) and UHF signal propagation well beyond the normal radio horizon distance.

Electromagnetic radiation

electromagnetic waveelectromagnetic waveselectromagnetic
Very high frequency (VHF) is the ITU designation for the range of radio frequency electromagnetic waves (radio waves) from 30 to 300 megahertz (MHz), with corresponding wavelengths of ten meters to one meter.
VHF = Very high frequency (radio)

Rubber ducky antenna

Rubber Duckyantennarubber duck
Portable radios usually use whips or rubber ducky antennas, while base stations usually use larger fiberglass whips or collinear arrays of vertical dipoles.
Electrically short antennas like the rubber ducky are used in portable handheld radio equipment at VHF and UHF frequencies in place of a quarter wavelength whip antenna, which is inconveniently long and cumbersome at these frequencies.

Whip antenna

ground plane antennaWhipwhip-style
Portable radios usually use whips or rubber ducky antennas, while base stations usually use larger fiberglass whips or collinear arrays of vertical dipoles. VHF is the first band at which wavelengths are small enough that efficient transmitting antennas are short enough to mount on vehicles and handheld devices, a quarter wave whip antenna at VHF frequencies is 25 cm to 2.5 meter (10 inches to 8 feet) long.
Whips are the most common type of monopole antenna, and are used in the higher frequency HF, VHF and UHF radio bands.

6-meter band

6 meters6 meterMagic Band
The 6-meter band is the lowest portion of the very high frequency (VHF) radio spectrum allocated to amateur radio use.

Line-of-sight propagation

line of sightline-of-sightradio horizon
Radio waves in the VHF band propagate mainly by line-of-sight and ground-bounce paths; unlike in the HF band there is only some reflection at lower frequencies from the ionosphere (skywave propagation).
However, at frequencies above 30 MHz (VHF and higher) and in lower levels of the atmosphere, neither of these effects are significant.

Batwing antenna

BatwingBow-tie designSuperturnstile
Television and FM broadcasting stations use collinear arrays of specialized dipole antennas such as batwing antennas.
A batwing or super turnstile antenna is a type of broadcasting antenna used at VHF and UHF frequencies, named for its distinctive shape which resembles a bat wing or bow tie.

2-meter band

2 meters2-meter2 m
The 2-meter amateur radio band is a portion of the VHF radio spectrum, comprising frequencies stretching from 144 MHz to 148 MHz in International Telecommunication Union region (ITU) Regions 2 (North and South America plus Hawaii) and 3 (Asia and Oceania) and from 144 MHz to 146 MHz in ITU Region 1 (Europe, Africa, and Russia).

Yagi–Uda antenna

Yagi antennaYagi-Uda antennaYagi
For directional antennas, the Yagi antenna is the most widely used as a high gain or "beam" antenna.
Also called a "beam antenna", or "parasitic array", the Yagi is very widely used as a high-gain antenna on the HF, VHF and UHF bands.

Radio noise

staticnoiseNoise (radio)
Atmospheric radio noise and interference (RFI) from electrical equipment is less of a problem in this and higher frequency bands than at lower frequencies.
Conversely, at very high frequency and ultra high frequency and above, these sources are often lower, and thermal noise is usually the limiting factor.

Band III

high VHFhigh-bandBand 3
Until 2013, the four main Free-to-Air TV stations in New Zealand used the VHF Television bands (Band I and Band III) to transmit to New Zealand households.
Band III is the name of the range of radio frequencies within the very high frequency (VHF) part of the electromagnetic spectrum from 174 to 240 megahertz (MHz).

NBN Television

NBNNBN-3NBN News
A couple of notable examples were NBN-3 Newcastle, WIN-4 Wollongong and ABC Newcastle on channel 5.
NBN-3 would transmit on VHF channel 3, from a transmitter atop Mount Sugarloaf near Newcastle.