Vice President of the United States

Vice PresidentU.S. Vice Presidentvice presidentialPresidentVice-PresidentVice-President of the United Statesvice-presidentialUnited States Vice PresidentUS Vice Presidentvice presidency
The vice president of the United States is the second-highest office in the executive branch of the U.S. federal government, after the president of the United States, and ranks first in the presidential line of succession.wikipedia
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Presiding Officer of the United States Senate

presiding officerPresident of the SenatePresiding Officer of the Senate
In this capacity, the vice president is empowered to preside over Senate deliberations, but may not vote except to cast a tie-breaking vote. [[Article One of the United States Constitution#Clause 4: Vice President as President of Senate|Article I, Section 3, Clause 4]] confers upon the vice president the title president of the Senate and authorizes him to preside over Senate meetings.
The actual role is usually performed by one of three officials: the Vice President; an elected United States Senator; or, in special cases, the Chief Justice.

United States Electoral College

Electoral Collegepresidential electorelectoral votes
The vice president is indirectly elected together with the president to a four-year term of office by the people of the United States through the Electoral College.
The Electoral College is a body of electors established by the United States Constitution, constituted every four years for the sole purpose of electing the president and vice president of the United States.

President of the United States

PresidentU.S. PresidentUnited States President
The vice president of the United States is the second-highest office in the executive branch of the U.S. federal government, after the president of the United States, and ranks first in the presidential line of succession.
Through the Electoral College, registered voters indirectly elect the president and vice president to a four-year term.

Twenty-fifth Amendment to the United States Constitution

25th AmendmentTwenty-fifth Amendment25th Amendment to the United States Constitution
Section2 of the Twenty-fifth Amendment, ratified in 1967, created a mechanism for intra-term vice presidential succession, establishing that vice presidential vacancies will be filled by the president and confirmed by both houses of Congress.
It clarifies that the vice president becomes president (as opposed to acting president) if the president dies, resigns, or is removed from office; and establishes procedures for filling a vacancy in the office of the vice president and for responding to presidential disabilities.

Mike Pence

Michael PencePenceVice President Mike Pence
Mike Pence is the 48th and current vice president of the United States.
Michael Richard Pence (born June 7, 1959) is an American politician and lawyer serving as the 48th vice president of the United States.

United States presidential line of succession

presidential line of successionline of successionline of succession to the presidency
The vice president of the United States is the second-highest office in the executive branch of the U.S. federal government, after the president of the United States, and ranks first in the presidential line of succession.
The vice president of the United States is designated as first in the presidential line of succession by the Article II succession clause, which also authorizes Congress to provide for a line of succession beyond the Vice President; it has done so on three occasions.

Office of the Vice President of the United States

Office of the Vice PresidentCounsel to the Vice PresidentVice President's office
The Office of the Vice President assists and organises the vice president's official functions.
The Office of the Vice President includes personnel who directly support or advise the Vice President of the United States.

Joint session of the United States Congress

joint session of Congressjoint sessionAddressed U.S. Congress
The vice president also presides over joint sessions of Congress.
However, the Constitution requires the vice president (as president of the Senate) to preside over the counting of electoral votes.

Casting vote

votes to break tiescast a tie-breaking votetie-breaking vote
In this capacity, the vice president is empowered to preside over Senate deliberations, but may not vote except to cast a tie-breaking vote.
Examples of officers who hold casting votes are the Speaker of the British House of Commons and the President of the United States Senate (an ex-officio role of the Vice President of the United States).

1796 United States presidential election

17961796 presidential election1796 election
In the election of 1796, Federalist John Adams won the presidency, but his bitter rival, Democratic-Republican Thomas Jefferson came second and became vice president.
Incumbent Vice President John Adams of the Federalist Party defeated former Secretary of State Thomas Jefferson of the Democratic-Republican Party.

Aaron Burr

Aaron Burr, Jr.Aaron Burr Jr.Burr, Aaron
Then, four years later, in the election of 1800, Jefferson, and fellow Democratic-Republican Aaron Burr each received 73 electoral votes.
He was the third vice president of the United States (1801–1805), serving during President Thomas Jefferson's first term.

1800 United States presidential election

18001800 presidential electionelection of 1800
Then, four years later, in the election of 1800, Jefferson, and fellow Democratic-Republican Aaron Burr each received 73 electoral votes.
In what is sometimes referred to as the "Revolution of 1800", Vice President Thomas Jefferson of the Democratic-Republican Party defeated incumbent President John Adams of the Federalist Party.

Twelfth Amendment to the United States Constitution

Twelfth Amendment12th Amendment12th Amendment to the US Constitution
Afterward, the system was overhauled through the Twelfth Amendment in time to be used in the 1804 election.
The Twelfth Amendment (Amendment XII) to the United States Constitution provides the procedure for electing the President and Vice President.

Levi P. Morton

Levi MortonLevi Parsons MortonMorton
Several 19th-century vice presidents—such as George Dallas, Levi Morton, and Garret Hobart—followed their example and led effectively, while others were rarely present.
Levi Parsons Morton (May 16, 1824 – May 16, 1920) was the 22nd vice president of the United States from 1889 to 1893.

George M. Dallas

George Mifflin DallasGeorge DallasDallas
Several 19th-century vice presidents—such as George Dallas, Levi Morton, and Garret Hobart—followed their example and led effectively, while others were rarely present.
George Mifflin Dallas (July 10, 1792 – December 31, 1864) was an American politician and diplomat who served as mayor of Philadelphia from 1828 to 1829 and as the 11th vice president of the United States from 1845 to 1849.

Garret Hobart

Garrett HobartGarret A. HobartGarret Augustus Hobart
Several 19th-century vice presidents—such as George Dallas, Levi Morton, and Garret Hobart—followed their example and led effectively, while others were rarely present.
Garret Augustus Hobart (June 3, 1844 – November 21, 1899) was the 24th vice president of the United States, serving from 1897 until his death.

List of tie-breaking votes cast by the vice president of the United States

tie-breaking votetie-breaking votesany tie-breaking votes
With this position comes the authority to cast a tie-breaking vote.
The vice president of the United States is the ex officio president of the Senate, as provided in Article I, Section 3, Clause 4, of the United States Constitution, but may only vote in order to break a tie.

Contingent election

electno candidate receives the minimum 270 electoral votes needed to win the electiontie-breaker by the United States House of Representatives
If there were a tie for first or for second place, or if no one won a majority of votes, the president and vice president would be selected by means of contingent elections protocols stated in the clause.
In the United States, a contingent election is the procedure used in presidential elections in the case where no candidate wins an absolute majority of votes in the Electoral College, the constitutional mechanism for electing the president and the vice president of the United States.

Joe Biden

Joseph BidenBidenVice President Joe Biden
During his first year in office (through January 24, 2018), Mike Pence cast eight tie-breaking votes; his predecessor, Joe Biden, did not cast any during his eight years in office.
Joseph Robinette Biden Jr. (born November 20, 1942) is an American politician who served as the 47th vice president of the United States from 2009 to 2017.

John C. Calhoun

John CalhounJohn Caldwell CalhounCalhoun
John C. Calhoun holds the record at 31 votes, followed closely by John Adams with 29.
John Caldwell Calhoun (March 18, 1782 – March 31, 1850) was an American statesman from the Democratic party and political theorist from South Carolina who served as the seventh vice president of the United States from 1825 to 1832.

Article One of the United States Constitution

Article IArticle OneU.S. Const. art. I
[[Article One of the United States Constitution#Clause 4: Vice President as President of Senate|Article I, Section 3, Clause 4]] confers upon the vice president the title president of the Senate and authorizes him to preside over Senate meetings.
Section 3 lays out various other rules for the Senate, including a provision that establishes the Vice President of the United States as the president of the Senate.

Charles G. Dawes

Charles DawesCharles Gates DawesDawes
Thus, Time magazine wrote in 1925, during the tenure of Vice President Charles G. Dawes, "once in four years the Vice President can make a little speech, and then he is done. For four years he then has to sit in the seat of the silent, attending to speeches ponderous or otherwise, of deliberation or humor."
Charles Gates Dawes (August 27, 1865 – April 23, 1951) was an American banker, general, diplomat, composer, and Republican politician who was the 30th vice president of the United States from 1925 to 1929.

President pro tempore of the United States Senate

President pro temporePresident pro tempore of the SenatePresident ''pro tempore'' of the Senate
As the framers of the Constitution anticipated that the vice president would not always be available to fulfill this responsibility, the Constitution provides that the Senate may elect a president pro tempore (or "president for a time") in order to maintain the proper ordering of the legislative process.
Article One, Section Three of the United States Constitution provides that the vice president of the United States is the president of the Senate (despite not being a senator), and mandates that the Senate must choose a president pro tempore to act in the vice president's absence.

2020 United States presidential election

2020 U.S. presidential election2020 presidential election2020
It will next take place following the 2020 presidential election, on January 6, 2021 (unless Congress sets a different date by law).
Voters will select presidential electors who in turn on December 14, 2020, will either elect a new president and vice president or re-elect the incumbents.

John C. Breckinridge

BreckinridgeJohn Cabell BreckinridgeJohn Breckinridge
Conversely, John C. Breckinridge, in 1861, Richard Nixon, in 1961, and Al Gore, in 2001, all had to announce their opponent's election.
He represented Kentucky in both houses of Congress and became the 14th and youngest-ever vice president of the United States, serving from 1857 to 1861.