Viceroy

viceregalvice-regalnamestniknamestnichestvovicereineviceroysnamiestnikviceroyaltiesViceroyaltySpanish Viceroy
A viceroy is an official who runs a country, colony, city, province, or sub-national state, in the name of and as the representative of the monarch of the territory.wikipedia
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Viceroyalty

viceroyaltiesfour viceroyalties Spain created in the Americasoverseas viceroyalty
A viceroy's territory may be called a viceroyalty, though this term is not always applied.
A viceroyalty is an entity headed by a viceroy.

List of viceroys of Sicily

Viceroy of SicilyViceroyviceroys of Sicily
List of Spanish Viceroys of Sicily
This is a list of viceroys of Sicily:

List of viceroys of Naples

viceroy of NaplesViceroySpanish viceroys
List of Spanish Viceroys of Naples
Commonly staying far from Naples, these rulers governed the Kingdom through a series of viceroys.

New Spain

Viceroyalty of New SpainSpanishMexico
With the Spanish colonization of the Americas, the institution of viceroys was adapted to govern the highly populated and wealthy regions of the north overseas: New Spain (Mexico and Philippines) and the south overseas: Peru and South America. Viceroyalty of New Spain (1535–1821) – List of Viceroys of New Spain
It was officially created on 8 March 1535 as a viceroyalty (Spanish: virreinato), the first of four viceroyalties Spain created in the Americas.

Governor-General of India

Viceroy of IndiaViceroyGovernor-General
An individual viceroy often also held a noble title, however, such as Louis Mountbatten, 1st Earl Mountbatten of Burma who was also Viceroy of India.
From 1858, to reflect the Governor-General's new additional role as the Monarch's representative in re the fealty relationships vis the princely states, the additional title of Viceroy was granted, such that the new office was entitled Viceroy and Governor-General of India.

Viceroyalty of Peru

PeruViceroy of PeruViceroyalty
With the Spanish colonization of the Americas, the institution of viceroys was adapted to govern the highly populated and wealthy regions of the north overseas: New Spain (Mexico and Philippines) and the south overseas: Peru and South America.
The Viceroyalty of Peru was one of the two Spanish Viceroyalties in the Americas from the sixteenth to the eighteenth centuries.

Mexico City

Mexico City, MexicoFederal DistrictDistrito Federal
The viceroys of these two areas had oversight over the other provinces, with most of the North American, Central American, Caribbean and East Indian areas supervised by the viceroy in Mexico City and the South American ones by the viceroy in Lima, (with the exception of most of today's Venezuela, which was overseen by the high court, or Audiencia of Santo Domingo on the island of Hispaniola for most of the colonial period).
The first Spanish viceroy arrived in Mexico City fourteen years later.

List of viceroys of New Spain

Viceroy of New SpainViceroyGovernor of the Indies
Viceroyalty of New Spain (1535–1821) – List of Viceroys of New Spain
In addition to viceroys, the following lists the highest Spanish governors of the colony of New Spain, before the appointment of the first viceroy or when the office of viceroy was vacant.

List of Viceroys of New Granada

Viceroy of New GranadaVicegerent of the King's PersonViceroy of the New Granada
Viceroyalty of New Granada (1717–1819) – List of Viceroys of New Granada
Spanish viceroys of the colonial Viceroyalty of New Granada (1717−1819) located in northern South America.

Viceroyalty of New Granada

New GranadaNeogranadineNueva Granada
Viceroyalty of New Granada (1717–1819) – List of Viceroys of New Granada New viceroyalties were created for New Granada in 1717 (capital, Bogotá) and the Río de la Plata in 1776 (capital, Buenos Aires).
Nearly two centuries after the establishment of the New Kingdom of Granada in the 16th century, whose governor was dependent upon the Viceroy of Peru at Lima, and an audiencia at Santa Fé de Bogotá (today capital of the republic of Colombia), the slowness of communications between the two capitals led to the creation of an independent Viceroyalty of New Granada in 1717 (and its reestablishment in 1739 after a short interruption).

Columbian Viceroyalty

Viceroyalty of the Indies
Viceroyalty of the Indies (1492–1526)
The titles, always referred to together, of "Viceroy and Governor General".

Colonial Brazil

Brazilcolony of BrazilPortuguese colony of Brazil
After the end of the Iberian Union in 1640, the governors of Brazil that were members of the Portuguese high nobility started to use the title of Viceroy.
In contrast to the neighboring Spanish possessions, which had several viceroyalties with jurisdiction initially over New Spain (Mexico) and Peru, and in the eighteenth century expanded to viceroyalties of Rio de la Plata and New Granada, the Portuguese colony of Brazil was settled mainly in the coastal area by the Portuguese and a large black slave population working sugar plantations and mines.

Vasco da Gama

Vasco de GamaCaravel ''BérrioCR Vasco da Gama
The government started six years after the discovery of sea route to India by Vasco da Gama, in 1505, under first Viceroy Francisco de Almeida (b.1450–d.1510).
For his contributions, in 1524 da Gama was appointed Governor of India, with the title of Viceroy, and was ennobled as Count of Vidigueira in 1519.

Kingdom of Sicily

SicilySicilianKing of Sicily
In Europe, until the 18th century, the Habsburg crown appointed viceroys of Aragon, Valencia, Catalonia, Navarre, Portugal, Sardinia, Sicily, and Naples.
In 1530, in an effort to protect Rome from Ottoman invasion from the south, Charles V, Holy Roman Emperor, as Charles I of Spain, gave the Islands of Malta and Gozo to the Knights Hospitaller in perpetual fiefdom, in exchange for an annual fee of two Maltese falcons, which they were to send on All Souls' Day to the Viceroy of Sicily.

Spanish Empire

SpanishSpainSpanish Crown
After the unification, at the end of the 15th century, later kings of Spain came to appoint numerous viceroys to rule over various parts of the increasingly vast Spanish Empire in Europe, the Americas, and overseas elsewhere.
The impossibility of the physical presence of the monarch and the necessity of strong royal governance in The Indies resulted in the appointment of viceroys ("vice-kings"), the direct representation of the monarch, in both civil and ecclesiastical spheres.

Governor General of Canada

Governor GeneralGovernors GeneralCanadian Governor General
The governor general of Canada, the lieutenant governors of the Canadian provinces and the governors-general of Australia and governors of the Australian states are viceroys in terms of the Balfour Declaration of 1926.
The Governor General of Canada (Gouverneure générale du Canada) is the federal viceregal representative of the.

Lieutenant governor (Canada)

Lieutenant Governorlieutenant governorsLieutenant-Governor
The governor general of Canada, the lieutenant governors of the Canadian provinces and the governors-general of Australia and governors of the Australian states are viceroys in terms of the Balfour Declaration of 1926.
In Canada, a lieutenant governor (French [masculine]: lieutenant-gouverneur, or [feminine]: lieutenant-gouverneure) is the viceregal representative in a provincial jurisdiction of the.

Lord Lieutenant of Ireland

Lord Lieutenantlord-lieutenant of IrelandLord Deputy of Ireland
The Lords Lieutenant of Ireland were often referred to as "Viceroy" after 1700 until 1922, even though the Kingdom of Ireland had been merged in 1801 into the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland.
The office, under its various names, was often more generally known as the viceroy (an Leasrí ), and his wife was known as the vicereine.

Kingdom of Ireland

IrelandIrishCrown
The Lords Lieutenant of Ireland were often referred to as "Viceroy" after 1700 until 1922, even though the Kingdom of Ireland had been merged in 1801 into the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland.
The kingdom was administered from Dublin Castle nominally by the King or Queen, who appointed a viceroy (the Lord Deputy, later Lord Lieutenant) to rule in their stead.

Crown of Castile

CastileCastilianCastilians
The Americas were incorporated into the Crown of Castile.
The other Spanish regions maintained certain degree of autonomy, being governed by a Viceroy.

Bourbon Reforms

borbon reformsadministrative reformsBourbon
These large administrative territories became known as Viceroyalties (Spanish term: Virreinatos). There were only two New World viceroyalties until the 18th century, when the new Bourbon Dynasty established two additional viceroyalties to promote economic growth and new settlements on South America.
A vice royalty is basically a territory governed by a viceroy, a ruler exercising authority in a colony on behalf of a sovereign.

Dominion of India

IndiaUnion of IndiaIndian Union
This process was accelerated by the Government of India Act 1935 and ultimately led to the independence of India and Pakistan as dominions in 1947.
However, the Governor-General was not designated Viceroy, as had been customary under the British Raj.

Intendant (government official)

intendantIntendente Municipalintendancy
The Bourbon Reforms introduced the new office of the intendant, which was appointed directly by the crown and had broad fiscal and administrative powers in political and military issues.
Initially intendancies were held by a separate person from the viceroy or the governor, but eventually in many places the offices were granted to one person due to conflicts that emerged between these two.

Cabildo (council)

cabildocabildosayuntamientos
These units gathered the local provinces which could be governed by either a crown official, a corregidor (sometimes alcalde mayor) or by a cabildo or town council.
Usually the cabildo made local laws and reported to the presidente (president) of the audiencia, who in turn reported to the viceroy.