Victor Watts

Victor Watts, (18 April 1938 – 21 December 2002) was a British toponymist, medievalist, translator, and academic, specialising in English place names.wikipedia
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Grey College, Durham

Grey CollegeGrey
He served as Master of Grey College, Durham from 1989 until his sudden death in 2002.

English Place-Name Society

English Place Name SocietyEnglishEnglish Place-Name Survey
He had been a lecturer in English at Durham University from 1962, honorary director of the English Place-Name Survey from 1993, and editor of the Journal of the English Place-Name Society from 1996.
Victor Watts became Honorary Director in 1992 until his death in 2002 when he was succeeded by Professor Richard Coates.

Toponymy

toponymtoponymsplace name
Victor Watts, (18 April 1938 – 21 December 2002) was a British toponymist, medievalist, translator, and academic, specialising in English place names.

Medieval studies

medievalistMedievalCentre for Medieval Studies
Victor Watts, (18 April 1938 – 21 December 2002) was a British toponymist, medievalist, translator, and academic, specialising in English place names.

Toponymy of England

English placenamesEnglish toponymyEnglish place names
Victor Watts, (18 April 1938 – 21 December 2002) was a British toponymist, medievalist, translator, and academic, specialising in English place names.

Master (college)

MasterPresidentPrincipal
He served as Master of Grey College, Durham from 1989 until his sudden death in 2002.

Lecturer

university lecturerlectureshipassistant lecturer
He had been a lecturer in English at Durham University from 1962, honorary director of the English Place-Name Survey from 1993, and editor of the Journal of the English Place-Name Society from 1996. In 1962, Watts jointed Durham University as a lecturer in English language.

Durham University

University of DurhamDurhamcollege
He had been a lecturer in English at Durham University from 1962, honorary director of the English Place-Name Survey from 1993, and editor of the Journal of the English Place-Name Society from 1996. In 1962, Watts jointed Durham University as a lecturer in English language.

Bristol Grammar School

Old BristoliansBristol GrammarGrammar school
He was educated at Bristol Grammar School, then an all-boys independent school in Bristol.

Independent school (United Kingdom)

independentindependent schoolindependent schools
He was educated at Bristol Grammar School, then an all-boys independent school in Bristol.

Bristol

Bristol, EnglandCity of BristolBristol, UK
He was educated at Bristol Grammar School, then an all-boys independent school in Bristol.

Merton College, Oxford

Merton CollegeMertonSt Alban Hall
He studied at Merton College, Oxford, and at the University of London.

English language

EnglishEnglish-languageen
In 1962, Watts jointed Durham University as a lecturer in English language.

Senior lecturer

senior-lecturerUniversity Lecturer
He was promoted to senior lecturer in 1974.

Colleges of Durham University

Armstrong CollegeArmstrong College, NewcastleDurham College of Science
He additionally served as Dean of Colleges, leading the university's 15 colleges, between 1999 and 2002.

Royal Historical Society

FRHistSFellow of the Royal Historical SocietyFRHS
Watts had been elected a Fellow of the Royal Historical Society (FRHistS), and a Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries of London (FSA).

Society of Antiquaries of London

Society of AntiquariesFSAFellow of the Society of Antiquaries of London
Watts had been elected a Fellow of the Royal Historical Society (FRHistS), and a Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries of London (FSA).

Cornovii (Cornwall)

CornoviiCornovii (Cornish)among the Cornish
For instance, Graham Webster in The Cornovii (1991), which is primarily about the Midlands tribe, states that this could apply as long as the geography was apparent, as it might have been to Roman surveyors in the first century, and Victor Watts in the Cambridge Dictionary of English Place-names (2010) interprets the name *Cornowii, a different spelling for latinised Cornovii, as "the people of the horn".

Framwelgate

FramwellgateDryburn
While name Dryburn is popularly claimed to derive from a stream that dried up following the execution of a Jesuit or a corruption of Tyburn (London's place of execution), Victor Watts has shown the name, deriving from the middle English for 'dry stream' was being used by at least the 14th century.