Video tape recorder

VTRvideotape recordervideo tape recordingvideo recordervideo tape recordersdeckOpen-reel video recordingrecord decktape deckstaped
A video tape recorder (VTR) is a tape recorder designed to record and playback video and audio material on magnetic tape.wikipedia
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Video

analog videovideo albumvideo recording
A video tape recorder (VTR) is a tape recorder designed to record and playback video and audio material on magnetic tape.
Charles Ginsburg led an Ampex research team developing one of the first practical video tape recorder (VTR).

Reel-to-reel audio tape recording

reel-to-reelreel-to-reel tapereel to reel
The early VTRs were open-reel devices which record on individual reels of 2-inch-wide (5.08 cm) tape.
Reel-to-reel tape was used also in early tape drives for data storage on mainframe computers and in video tape recorders (VTRs).

Magnetic tape

tapetapesanalog tape
A video tape recorder (VTR) is a tape recorder designed to record and playback video and audio material on magnetic tape.
Devices that record and play back audio and video using magnetic tape are tape recorders and video tape recorders respectively.

Ampex

Ampex CorporationAmpex RecordsAmpex HS-100 model
Bing asked Ampex to build one and also set up a laboratory for Mullin in Bing Crosby Enterprises (BCE) to build one.
Starting in the 1950s, the company began developing video tape recorders, and later introduced the helical scan concept that make home video players possible.

Videocassette recorder

VCRvideo cassette recorderVCRs
Improved formats, in which the tape was contained inside a videocassette, were introduced around 1969; the machines which play them are called videocassette recorders.
In 1953, Victor C Rumbeldorf developed a prototype helical scan video tape recorder.

Helical scan

helical-scanhead wheelscan
In 1953 Dr. Norikazu Sawazaki developed a prototype helical scan video tape recorder.
It is used in open-reel video tape recorders, video cassette recorders, digital audio tape recorders, and some computer tape drives.

CV-2000

CV series
The Sony model CV-2000, first marketed in 1965, is their first VTR intended for home use and is based on half-inch tape.
CV-2000 was one of the world's first home video tape recorders (VTR), introduced by Sony in August, 1965.

EIAJ-1

EIAJ1/2" EIAJEIAJ type 1
The EIAJ format is a standard half-inch format used by various manufacturers.
EIAJ-1 was a standard for video tape recorders (VTRs) developed by the Electronic Industries Association of Japan with the cooperation and assistance of several Japanese electronics manufacturers in 1969.

Videotape

videocassettevideo tapevideo
Improved formats, in which the tape was contained inside a videocassette, were introduced around 1969; the machines which play them are called videocassette recorders.
Videotape is used in both video tape recorders (VTRs) or, more commonly, videocassette recorders (VCRs) and camcorders.

VHS

videoVHS tapeVHS tapes
It was soon followed by the competing VHS (Video Home System) format from JVC in 1977 and later by other formats such as Video 2000 from Philips, V-Cord from Sanyo, and Great Time Machine from Quasar.
From the 1950s, magnetic tape video recording became a major contributor to the television industry, via the first commercialized video tape recorders (VTRs).

Bing Crosby

Bing Crosby ProductionsCrosbyBing
In early 1951, Bing Crosby asked his Chief Engineer John T. (Jack) Mullin if television could be recorded on tape as was the case for audio.
Mullin continued to work for Crosby to develop a videotape recorder (VTR).

Video tape tracking

trackingtape trackingtracking errors
Transverse error (error arising from effects in the cross-tape direction) can be caused by variations in the rotational speed of the scanning drum and differences in the angle between the tape and the scanning heads (usually addressed by video tracking controls).
In a video tape recorder, tracking is a calibration adjustment which ensures that the spinning playback head is properly aligned with the helical scan signal written onto the tape.

Type B videotape

1 inch type B videotape1" Type BType B
1 inch type B VTR (designated Type B by SMPTE) is a reel-to-reel analog recording video tape format developed by the Bosch Fernseh division of Bosch in Germany in 1976.

Ampex 2 inch helical VTR

VR-8000
From 1963 to 1970, Ampex manufactured several models of VTR 2-inch helical VTRs, capable of recording and playing back analog black and white video.

Tape recorder

audio tapetape machineaudiotape
A video tape recorder (VTR) is a tape recorder designed to record and playback video and audio material on magnetic tape.

IVC videotape format

IVC 2 inch Helical scan2" Helical Scan VideotapeIVC 870 1" helical scan VTR
IVC 2 inch Helical scan was a high-end broadcast quality helical scan analog recording VTR format developed by International Video Corporation (IVC), and introduced in 1975.

International Video Corporation

IVC
International Video Corporation, or IVC, was a California company with large European operations that manufactured a number of models of Middle to High end videotape recorders, or VTRs, for industrial and professional use in the US, alongside a range of digital video Time Base Correctors and Special Effects units designed and manufactured in the UK.

June 1963

29 June 1963June 11, 1963June 12
The Telcan, produced by the Nottingham Electronic Valve Company and demonstrated on June 24, 1963, was the first home video recorder.

Quadruplex videotape

quadruplex2 inch Quadruplex videotape2" Quadruplex
It uses the 2" quadruplex format, using two-inch (5.1 cm) tape. Because of its US$50,000 price, the Ampex VRX-1000 could be afforded only by the television networks and the largest individual stations.
At the same time, the BBC developed a similar stationary-head video tape recorder (VTR) system that saw some on-air use, called VERA (Vision Electronic Recording Apparatus).

Digital video

videodigitaldigitally
Later developments saw analog magnetic tapes largely replaced by digital video tape formats.
Later on in the 1970s, manufacturers of professional video broadcast equipment, such as Bosch (through their Fernseh division) and Ampex developed prototype digital videotape recorders (VTR) in their research and development labs.

Betacam

Digital BetacamBetacam SPDigiBeta
The Betacam camcorder can only load S magnetic tapes, while television studio sized video tape recorders (VTR) designed for video editing can play both S and L tapes.

JVC

JVC VictorVictorVictor Company of Japan
It was soon followed by the competing VHS (Video Home System) format from JVC in 1977 and later by other formats such as Video 2000 from Philips, V-Cord from Sanyo, and Great Time Machine from Quasar.