Videotape format war

format warformat warsBetabetamaxBetamax versus VHS battleBetamax vs. VHSSony BetamaxVHS and Betamax warVHS/Betamax format warvideo formats
The videotape format war was a period of intense competition or "format war" of incompatible models of consumer-level analog video videocassette and video cassette recorders (VCR) in the late 1970s and the 1980s, mainly involving the Betamax and Video Home System (VHS) formats.wikipedia
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Betamax

BetaBeta TapeBeta-Max
The videotape format war was a period of intense competition or "format war" of incompatible models of consumer-level analog video videocassette and video cassette recorders (VCR) in the late 1970s and the 1980s, mainly involving the Betamax and Video Home System (VHS) formats.
Betamax is obsolete, having lost the videotape format war to VHS.

VHS

videoVHS tapeVHS tapes
The videotape format war was a period of intense competition or "format war" of incompatible models of consumer-level analog video videocassette and video cassette recorders (VCR) in the late 1970s and the 1980s, mainly involving the Betamax and Video Home System (VHS) formats.
In the 1970s and early 1980s, there was a format war in the home video industry.

Format war

achieved dominancebattle of formatsdispute
The videotape format war was a period of intense competition or "format war" of incompatible models of consumer-level analog video videocassette and video cassette recorders (VCR) in the late 1970s and the 1980s, mainly involving the Betamax and Video Home System (VHS) formats.

Sony

Sony CorporationSony ElectronicsSony Corp.
The first consumer-grade VCR to be released was the Philips N1500 VCR format in 1972, followed in 1975 by Sony's Betamax.
Sony was involved in the videotape format war of the early 1980s, when they were marketing the Betamax system for video cassette recorders against the VHS format developed by JVC.

JVC

JVC VictorVictorVictor Company of Japan
This was quickly followed by the competing VHS format from JVC, and later by Video 2000 from Philips.
Sony, which had introduced the Betamax home videocassette tape a year earlier, became the main competitor for JVC's VHS format into the 1980s, creating the videotape format war.

Video 2000

V2000Video Compact Cassettedynamic track following
This was quickly followed by the competing VHS format from JVC, and later by Video 2000 from Philips.
Despite this, the format was not a major success and was eventually discontinued, having lost out to the rival VHS system in the videotape format war.

Videotape

videocassettevideo tapevideo
The videotape format war was a period of intense competition or "format war" of incompatible models of consumer-level analog video videocassette and video cassette recorders (VCR) in the late 1970s and the 1980s, mainly involving the Betamax and Video Home System (VHS) formats.
Sony's Betamax (1975) and JVC's VHS (1976) created a mass-market for VCRs and the two competing systems battled the "videotape format war", which VHS ultimately won.

Path dependence

path dependentpath dependencypath-dependent
This kind of lock-in and path dependence failed for Sony, but succeeded for JVC.
An alternative analysis is that VHS was better-adapted to market demands (e.g. having a longer recording time).

Capacitance Electronic Disc

CEDCED VideodiscSelectaVision
Manufacturers also introduced other systems such as needle-based, record-style discs (RCA's Capacitance Electronic Disc, JVC's Video High Density disc) and optical discs (Philips' LaserDisc).

High-definition optical disc format war

high definition optical disc format warformat waradvocates of the rival formats
A later format war resulted from a failure to agree on a single standard for DVD's high-definition successor (HD DVD) in May 2005.
The Blu-ray/HD DVD conflict resembled the earlier videotape format war between VHS and Betamax, partly because of Sony's strong involvement in both episodes.

DVD-Video

DVDDVD-VDVD video
CED's inexpensive record-like format (using a fine keel-shaped stylus to read an electronic signal rather than mechanical vibrations) made it attractive to low-income families during the 1980s, and LaserDisc's 5 megahertz/420 line resolution made it popular with discerning videophiles until circa 1997 (when DVD-Video became the new standard for high-quality).
Industry analysts likened the situation to the VHS/Betamax format war of the 1980s.

HD DVD

HD-DVDhigh definition3× DVD
A later format war resulted from a failure to agree on a single standard for DVD's high-definition successor (HD DVD) in May 2005.
Much like the VHS vs. Betamax videotape format war during the late 1970s and early 1980s, HD DVD was competing with a rival format—in this case, Blu-ray Disc.

DVD

DVD-ROMDVDsDVD-9
The major electronics corporations agreed on a single standard for playback of pre-recorded material on DVDs.
Wary of being caught in a repeat of the costly videotape format war between VHS and Betamax in the 1980s, he convened a group of computer industry experts, including representatives from Apple, Microsoft, Sun Microsystems, Dell, and many others.

Videocassette recorder

VCRvideo cassette recorderVCRs
The videotape format war was a period of intense competition or "format war" of incompatible models of consumer-level analog video videocassette and video cassette recorders (VCR) in the late 1970s and the 1980s, mainly involving the Betamax and Video Home System (VHS) formats.
The two major standards were Sony's Betamax (also known as Betacord or just Beta), and JVC's VHS (Video Home System), which competed for sales in what became known as the format war.

De facto standard

de facto'' standardde factode facto'' standards

Video

analog videovideo albumvideo recording
The videotape format war was a period of intense competition or "format war" of incompatible models of consumer-level analog video videocassette and video cassette recorders (VCR) in the late 1970s and the 1980s, mainly involving the Betamax and Video Home System (VHS) formats.

U-matic

Umatic3/4" tape3/4" U-matic
The first video cassette recorder (VCR) to become available was the U-matic system, released in September 1971.

Television show

television seriestelevision programTV series
U-matic was designed for commercial or professional television production use, and was not affordable or user-friendly for home videos or home movies.

Home video

home entertainmenthome mediavideo album
U-matic was designed for commercial or professional television production use, and was not affordable or user-friendly for home videos or home movies.

Home movies

home moviehome videoshome video
U-matic was designed for commercial or professional television production use, and was not affordable or user-friendly for home videos or home movies.

Philips

Philips ElectronicsRoyal Philips ElectronicsPhilips Media
The first consumer-grade VCR to be released was the Philips N1500 VCR format in 1972, followed in 1975 by Sony's Betamax.

Cartrivision

1/2" Cartrivision
Other competitors, such as the Avco Cartrivision, Sanyo's V-Cord and Matsushita's "Great Time Machine" quickly disappeared.

V-Cord

Other competitors, such as the Avco Cartrivision, Sanyo's V-Cord and Matsushita's "Great Time Machine" quickly disappeared.

VX (videocassette format)

VXGreat Time Machine
Other competitors, such as the Avco Cartrivision, Sanyo's V-Cord and Matsushita's "Great Time Machine" quickly disappeared.