Vienna

Vienna, AustriaWienVienneseWien, AustriaCity of ViennaGovernment of ViennaVienna South-WestWiennaAustriacapital of Austria
Vienna ( Wien ) is the capital and largest city of Austria.wikipedia
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Austria

AUTAustrianRepublic of Austria
Vienna ( Wien ) is the capital and largest city of Austria.
Austria (, ; Österreich ), officially the Republic of Austria (Republik Österreich, ), is a land-locked country in Central Europe composed of nine federated states (Bundesländer), one of which is Vienna, Austria's capital and its largest city.

Culture of Austria

Austrian cultureAustrianAustrian art
Vienna is Austria's primate city, with a population of about 1.9 million (2.6 million within the metropolitan area, nearly one third of the country's population), and its cultural, economic, and political centre.
Vienna, the capital city of the 2nd.

OPEC

Organization of Petroleum Exporting CountriesOrganization of the Petroleum Exporting CountriesOrganization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC)
Vienna is host to many major international organizations, including the United Nations, OPEC, and the OSCE.
The Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC, ) is an intergovernmental organization of nations, founded on 14 September 1960 in Baghdad by the first five members (Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, and Venezuela), and headquartered since 1965 in Vienna, Austria.

Sigmund Freud

FreudFreudianFreudian theory
Additionally to being labeled the "City of Music" due to its musical legacy, Vienna is also said to be the "City of Dreams", because of it being home to the world's first psychoanalyst Sigmund Freud.
Freud lived and worked in Vienna, having set up his clinical practice there in 1886.

Vienna Ring Road

RingstraßeRingstrasseRingstraßenpalais
The historic centre of Vienna is rich in architectural ensembles, including Baroque palaces and gardens, and the late-19th-century Ringstraße lined with grand buildings, monuments and parks.
The Ringstrasse (Ringstraße, lit. ring road) is a circular grand boulevard that serves as a ring road around the historic Innere Stadt (Inner Town) district of Vienna, Austria.

Mercer Quality of Living Survey

Quality of Living Survey2016 Quality of Living2018 Mercer survey
For ten consecutive years (2009–2019), the human-resource-consulting firm Mercer ranked Vienna first in its annual "Quality of Living" survey of hundreds of cities around the world.
The Mercer Quality of Living Survey ranks 231 cities from Vienna to Baghdad on quality of life.

Vindobona

VindabonaVindobonensisBerghof (Vienna)
Others believe that the name comes from the Roman settlement name of Celtic extraction Vindobona, probably meaning "fair village, white settlement" from Celtic roots, vindo-, meaning "bright" or "fair" – as in the Irish fionn and the Welsh gwyn –, and -bona "village, settlement".
Vindobona (from Gaulish windo- "white" and bona "base/bottom") was a Roman military camp on the site of the modern city of Vienna in Austria.

Economy of Austria

Austrian economyAustriaAustria's "social partnership
Vienna is Austria's primate city, with a population of about 1.9 million (2.6 million within the metropolitan area, nearly one third of the country's population), and its cultural, economic, and political centre.
Vienna was ranked the fifth richest NUTS-2 region within Europe (see Economy of Europe) with GDP reaching €38,632 per capita, just behind Inner London, Luxembourg, Brussels-Capital Region and Hamburg.

World War I

First World WarGreat WarWorld War One
Until the beginning of the 20th century, it was the largest German-speaking city in the world, and before the splitting of the Austro-Hungarian Empire in World War I, the city had 2 million inhabitants.
As historian Zbyněk Zeman later wrote, "the event almost failed to make any impression whatsoever. On Sunday and Monday (28 and 29 June), the crowds in Vienna listened to music and drank wine, as if nothing had happened."

Great Plague of Vienna

plagueGreat Plague1679 and 1713
A plague epidemic ravaged Vienna in 1679, killing nearly a third of its population.
The Great Plague of Vienna occurred in 1679 in Vienna, Austria, the imperial residence of the Austrian Habsburg rulers.

Battle of Vienna

Siege of Viennasecond siege of ViennaVienna
In the 16th and 17th centuries Christian forces stopped Ottoman armies twice outside Vienna (see Siege of Vienna, 1529 and Battle of Vienna, 1683).
The Battle of Vienna (Schlacht am Kahlen Berge or Kahlenberg (Battle of the Bald Mountains); bitwa pod Wiedniem or odsiecz wiedeńska (The Relief of Vienna); Modern Turkish: İkinci Viyana Kuşatması, Ottoman Turkish: Beç Ḳalʿası Muḥāṣarası) took place at Kahlenberg Mountain near Vienna on 12 September 1683 after the imperial city had been besieged by the Ottoman Empire for two months.

Congress of Vienna

Vienna CongressTreaty of ViennaFinal Act of the Congress of Vienna
The city continued to play a major role in European and world politics, including hosting the Congress of Vienna in 1814/15.
The Congress of Vienna (Congrès de Vienne, Wiener Kongress), also called Vienna Congress, was a meeting of ambassadors of European states chaired by Austrian statesman Klemens von Metternich, and held in Vienna from November 1814 to June 1815, though the delegates had arrived and were already negotiating by late September 1814.

Bratislava

PressburgPozsonyBratislava, Slovakia
Along with nearby Bratislava, Vienna forms a metropolitan region with 3 million inhabitants.
The city started to lose its importance under the reign of Maria Theresa's son Joseph II, especially after the crown jewels were taken to Vienna in 1783 in an attempt to strengthen the relations between Austria and Hungary.

Siege of Vienna

Viennabesieging ViennaFirst Turkish Siege
In the 16th and 17th centuries Christian forces stopped Ottoman armies twice outside Vienna (see Siege of Vienna, 1529 and Battle of Vienna, 1683).
The Siege of Vienna in 1529 was the first attempt by the Ottoman Empire, led by Suleiman the Magnificent, to capture the city of Vienna, Austria.

Klosterneuburg

WeidlingKierlingA
In 1145 Duke Henry II Jasomirgott moved the Babenberg family residence from Klosterneuburg in Lower Austria to Vienna.
It is located on the Danube, immediately north of the Austrian capital Vienna, from which it is separated by the Kahlenberg and Leopoldsberg hills of the Vienna Woods range.

List of rulers of Austria

Archduke of AustriaDuke of AustriaMonarch
This initial district grew into the duchy of Austria.
Claiming the title "Duke of Austria", he resided in Vienna from 1485 to his death in 1490.

Schottenstift

Schottenstift, ViennaScottish AbbeyScottish Benedictine Abbey
Irish Benedictines founded twelfth-century monastic settlements, evidence of these ties persists in the form of Vienna's great Schottenstift monastery (Scots Abbey), once home to many Irish monks.
The Schottenstift (Scottish Abbey), formally called Benediktinerabtei unserer Lieben Frau zu den Schotten (Benedictine Abbey of Our Dear Lady of the Scots), is a Roman Catholic monastery founded in Vienna in 1155 when Henry II of Austria brought Irish monks to Vienna.

United Nations

UNU.N.the United Nations
Vienna is host to many major international organizations, including the United Nations, OPEC, and the OSCE.
Its site—like UN headquarters buildings in Geneva, Vienna, and Nairobi—is designated as international territory.

Ludwig Wittgenstein

WittgensteinWittgensteinianLudwig
The city's cultural contributions in the first half of the 20th century included, among many, the Vienna Secession movement in art, psychoanalysis, the Second Viennese School (Schoenberg and co.), the architecture of Adolf Loos and the philosophy of Ludwig Wittgenstein and the Vienna Circle.
Born in Vienna into one of Europe's richest families, he inherited a fortune from his father in 1913.

Red Vienna

ViennaRotes Wien
Austrians came to regard Vienna as a centre of socialist politics, sometimes referred to as "Red Vienna".
Red Vienna (Rotes Wien) was the nickname of the capital of Austria between 1918 and 1934, when the Social Democrats had the majority and the city was democratically governed for the first time.

Second Viennese School

Vienna SchoolSecond Vienna SchoolThird Viennese School
The city's cultural contributions in the first half of the 20th century included, among many, the Vienna Secession movement in art, psychoanalysis, the Second Viennese School (Schoenberg and co.), the architecture of Adolf Loos and the philosophy of Ludwig Wittgenstein and the Vienna Circle.
The Second Viennese School (Zweite Wiener Schule, Neue Wiener Schule) is the group of composers that comprised Arnold Schoenberg and his pupils and close associates in early 20th century Vienna, where he lived and taught, sporadically, between 1903 and 1925.

Vienna Offensive

ViennaBattle of Vienna13 April 1945
On 2 April 1945, the Soviets launched the Vienna Offensive against the Germans holding the city and besieged it.
The Vienna Offensive was launched by the Soviet 2nd and 3rd Ukrainian Fronts in order to invade Vienna, Austria, during World War II.

Austrian Civil War

civil warFebruary Uprising1934 February Uprising
In the Austrian Civil War of 1934 Chancellor Engelbert Dollfuss sent the Austrian Army to shell civilian housing occupied by the socialist militia.
The clashes started in Linz and took place principally in the cities of Vienna, Graz, Bruck an der Mur, Judenburg, Wiener Neustadt and Steyr, but also in some other industrial cities of eastern and central Austria.

Heldenplatz

In 1938, after a triumphant entry into Austria, Austrian-born Adolf Hitler spoke to the Austrian Germans from the balcony of the Neue Burg, a part of the Hofburg at the Heldenplatz.
Heldenplatz (Heroes' Square) is a public space in front of the Hofburg Palace in Vienna, Austria.

Danube

Danube RiverRiver DanubeDanubian
Slovene-speakers call the city Dunaj, which in other Central European Slavic languages means the Danube River, on which the city stands.
The Danube then flows southeast for about, passing through four capital cities (Vienna, Bratislava, Budapest, and Belgrade) before emptying into the Black Sea via the Danube Delta in Romania and Ukraine.