Vienna Convention on the Law of Treaties

law of treatiestreaty lawaccededVienna Conventionaccession1969 Vienna Convention on the Law of Treatiesaccedeacceded totrucial1969 Vienna Convention on the Laws of Treaties
The Vienna Convention on the Law of Treaties (VCLT) is an international agreement regulating treaties between states.wikipedia
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Vienna Convention on the Law of Treaties between States and International Organizations or between International Organizations

Vienna Convention on the LVienna Convention
However, agreements between states and international organizations, or between international organizations themselves, are governed by the 1986 [[Vienna Convention on the Law of Treaties between States and International Organizations or Between International Organizations]] if it enters into force.
The Vienna Convention on the Law of Treaties between States and International Organizations or Between International Organizations (VCLTIO) is an extension of the Vienna Convention on the Law of Treaties which deals with treaties between States.

International Law Commission

United Nations International Law CommissionUnited Nations Law CommissionInternational Law Commission of the United Nations
The VCLT was drafted by the International Law Commission (ILC) of the United Nations, which began work on the convention in 1949.
Highest priority was given to the topics of law of treaties, arbitration, and regime of the sea, and rapporteurs were elected accordingly.

Clausula rebus sic stantibus

rebus sic stantibuschanged fundamentallyfundamental change in circumstances
Article 26 defines pacta sunt servanda, article 53 proclaims peremptory norm and article 62 proclaims Fundamental Change of Circumstance.
The doctrine is part of customary international law but is also provided for in the 1969 Vienna Convention on the Law of Treaties, under Article 62 (Fundamental Change of Circumstance).

Treaty

treatiesinternational treatyinternational treaties
The Vienna Convention on the Law of Treaties (VCLT) is an international agreement regulating treaties between states. International treaties and conventions contain rules about what entities could sign, ratify or accede to them.
International law on treaties have mostly been codified by the Vienna Convention on the Law of Treaties (VCLT), which sets forth the rules and procedures for creating, enforcing, amending, and interpreting treaties.

International law

public international lawinternationallaw of nations
International treaties and conventions contain rules about what entities could sign, ratify or accede to them.
On this view, "public" international law is said to cover relations between nation-states and includes fields such as treaty law, law of sea, international criminal law, the laws of war or international humanitarian law, international human rights law, and refugee law.

Peremptory norm

jus cogensius cogensnorm
Article 26 defines pacta sunt servanda, article 53 proclaims peremptory norm and article 62 proclaims Fundamental Change of Circumstance.
Under Article 53 of the Vienna Convention on the Law of Treaties, any treaty that conflicts with a peremptory norm is void.

Customary international law

customaryinternational customary lawcustom
The VCLT is considered a codification of customary international law and state practice concerning treaties.

Ratification

ratifiedratifyratifying
International treaties and conventions contain rules about what entities could sign, ratify or accede to them.

Vienna Convention on Diplomatic Relations

Vienna Convention1961 Vienna Convention1961 Vienna Convention on Diplomatic Relations

Sovereign state

statestatessovereign states
The Vienna Convention on the Law of Treaties (VCLT) is an international agreement regulating treaties between states.

United States

AmericanU.S.USA
Some non-ratifying parties, such as the United States, recognize parts of it as a restatement of customary law and binding upon them as such.

Customary law

customcustomarycustoms
Some non-ratifying parties, such as the United States, recognize parts of it as a restatement of customary law and binding upon them as such.

United Nations special rapporteur

Special RapporteurUN Special RapporteurU.N. Special Rapporteur
During the twenty years of preparation, several draft versions of the convention and commentaries were prepared by special rapporteurs of the ILC, which included prominent international law scholars James Brierly, Hersch Lauterpacht, Gerald Fitzmaurice and Humphrey Waldock.

Hersch Lauterpacht

Sir Hersch LauterpachtH. LauterpachtLauterpacht
During the twenty years of preparation, several draft versions of the convention and commentaries were prepared by special rapporteurs of the ILC, which included prominent international law scholars James Brierly, Hersch Lauterpacht, Gerald Fitzmaurice and Humphrey Waldock.

Gerald Fitzmaurice

Sir Gerald FitzmauriceGerald Gray FitzmauriceSir Gerald G. Fitzmaurice
During the twenty years of preparation, several draft versions of the convention and commentaries were prepared by special rapporteurs of the ILC, which included prominent international law scholars James Brierly, Hersch Lauterpacht, Gerald Fitzmaurice and Humphrey Waldock.

Humphrey Waldock

Claud Humphrey Meredith WaldockSir Humphrey WaldockHumphrey
During the twenty years of preparation, several draft versions of the convention and commentaries were prepared by special rapporteurs of the ILC, which included prominent international law scholars James Brierly, Hersch Lauterpacht, Gerald Fitzmaurice and Humphrey Waldock.

Pacta sunt servanda

cannot unilaterally rescindhonor our agreementspromises are made to be kept
Article 26 defines pacta sunt servanda, article 53 proclaims peremptory norm and article 62 proclaims Fundamental Change of Circumstance.

India

Taiwan

Republic of ChinaFormosaRepublic of China (Taiwan)
In addition, the Republic of China (Taiwan), which is currently only recognized by, signed the Convention in 1970 prior to the UN General Assembly's vote to transfer China's seat to the People's Republic of China (PRC) in 1971; the PRC subsequently acceded to the Convention.

United Nations General Assembly

General AssemblyUN General AssemblyGeneral Assembly of the United Nations
In addition, the Republic of China (Taiwan), which is currently only recognized by, signed the Convention in 1970 prior to the UN General Assembly's vote to transfer China's seat to the People's Republic of China (PRC) in 1971; the PRC subsequently acceded to the Convention.

United Nations General Assembly Resolution 2758

Resolution 2758UN General Assembly Resolution 2758vote to transfer China's seat
In addition, the Republic of China (Taiwan), which is currently only recognized by, signed the Convention in 1970 prior to the UN General Assembly's vote to transfer China's seat to the People's Republic of China (PRC) in 1971; the PRC subsequently acceded to the Convention.