Vindhya Range

VindhyaVindhyasVindhyanVindhya mountainsVindhya HillsVindhya mountain rangeVindhya mountainVindhyan PlateauVindhyan regionNorthern Vindhyas
The Vindhya Range (also known as Vindhyachal) is a complex, discontinuous chain of mountain ridges, hill ranges, highlands and plateau escarpments in west-central India.wikipedia
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Satpura Range

SatpuraSatpudaSatpuras
The exact extent of the Vindhyas is loosely defined, and historically, the term covered a number of distinct hill systems in central India, including the one that is now known as the Satpura Range. In certain Puranas, the term Vindhya specifically covers the mountain range located between the Narmada and the Tapti rivers; that is, the one which is now known as the Satpura Range.
The range parallels the Vindhya Range to the north, and these two east-west ranges divide Indian Subcontinent into the Indo-Gangetic plain of northern India and the Deccan Plateau of the south.

Escarpment

scarpscarpsescarpments
The Vindhya Range (also known as Vindhyachal) is a complex, discontinuous chain of mountain ridges, hill ranges, highlands and plateau escarpments in west-central India.

Vindhya Pradesh

The former Vindhya Pradesh was named after the Vindhya Range.
It was named for the Vindhya Range, which runs through the centre of the province.

India

IndianRepublic of IndiaIND
The Vindhya Range (also known as Vindhyachal) is a complex, discontinuous chain of mountain ridges, hill ranges, highlands and plateau escarpments in west-central India.
It extends as far north as the Satpura and Vindhya ranges in central India.

Narmada River

NarmadaNarmada ValleyRiver Narmada
Today, the term principally refers to the escarpment that runs north of and roughly parallel to the Narmada River in Madhya Pradesh, and its hilly extensions. In certain Puranas, the term Vindhya specifically covers the mountain range located between the Narmada and the Tapti rivers; that is, the one which is now known as the Satpura Range.
Narmada flows through the rift valley between Satpura and Vindhya ranges.

Madhya Pradesh

Madhya Pradesh StateMPM.P.
Today, the term principally refers to the escarpment that runs north of and roughly parallel to the Narmada River in Madhya Pradesh, and its hilly extensions.
The state straddles the Narmada River, which runs east and west between the Vindhya and Satpura ranges; these ranges and the Narmada are the traditional boundaries between the north and south of India.

Deccan Plateau

DeccanDeccan regionDeccan Peninsula
Earlier, the term "Vindhyas" was used in a wider sense, and included a number of hill ranges between the Indo-Gangetic plain and the Deccan Plateau.
It is separated from the Gangetic plain to the north by the Satpura and Vindhya Ranges, which form its northern boundary.

Uttar Pradesh

UPUttar Pradesh, IndiaU.P.
Depending on the definition, the range extends up to Gujarat in the west, Uttar Pradesh and Bihar in the north and Chhattisgarh in the east.
The smaller Vindhya Range and plateau region is in the south.

Indo-Gangetic Plain

Gangetic PlainGangetic plainsGanges Plain
Earlier, the term "Vindhyas" was used in a wider sense, and included a number of hill ranges between the Indo-Gangetic plain and the Deccan Plateau.
According to Manusmṛti (2.22), 'Aryavarta' is "the tract between the Himalaya and the Vindhya ranges, from the Eastern Sea (Bay of Bengal) to the Western Sea (Arabian Sea)".

Names for India

BharatBharatavarshaBharata
The three ranges are included in the seven Kula Parvatas ("clan mountains") of Bharatavarsha i.e. India.
According to Manusmṛti North India (i.e., India north of the Vindhyas) is also known as (Sanskrit: आर्यावर्त, abode of the Vedic people).

Malwa

MalavaMalwa PlateauMālwa
It runs roughly parallel to the Naramada river in the east-west direction, forming the southern wall of the Malwa plateau in Madhya Pradesh.
Geologically, the Malwa Plateau generally refers to the volcanic upland north of the Vindhya Range.

Gautamiputra Satakarni

Gautamiputra SatkarniGautami putra SatakarniGotami
Several ancient Indian texts and inscriptions (e.g. the Nasik Prasasti of Gautamiputra Satakarni) mention three mountain ranges in Central India: Vindhya (or "Vindhya proper"), Rksa (also Rksavat or Riksha) and Pariyatra (or Paripatra).
Sudhakar Chattopadhyaya identified it with an area in Madhya Pradesh, possibly near the western part of the Vindhyas.

Kaimur Range

Kaimur hillsKaimurKimur Range
A northern chain of the Vindhyas continues eastwards as Bhander Plateau and Kaimur Range, which runs north of the Son River.
Kaimur Range (also spelt Kymore) is the eastern portion of the Vindhya Range, about 483 km long, extending from around Katangi in Jabalpur district of Madhya Pradesh to around Sasaram in Rohtas district of Bihar.

Kishkindha

KishkindaKishkindha KingdomVanaras
In one passage, Valmiki's Ramayana describes Vindhya as being situated to the south of Kishkindha (Ramayana IV-46.
During the time of Ramayana, i.e., Treta Yuga, the whole region was within the dense forest called Dandaka Forest extending from Vindhya range to the South Indian peninsula.

Puranas

PuranaPuranicSthala Purana
In certain Puranas, the term Vindhya specifically covers the mountain range located between the Narmada and the Tapti rivers; that is, the one which is now known as the Satpura Range.

Amarkantak

AmarakantakaNarmada KundSarvodaya Digamber Jain Temple
A southern chain of Vindhyas runs between the upper reaches of the Son and Narmada rivers to meet the Satpura Range in the Maikal Hills near Amarkantak.
The Amarkantak region is a unique natural heritage area and is the meeting point of the Vindhya and the Satpura Ranges, with the Maikal Hills being the fulcrum.

Son River

SonSone RiverSone
A northern chain of the Vindhyas continues eastwards as Bhander Plateau and Kaimur Range, which runs north of the Son River. A southern chain of Vindhyas runs between the upper reaches of the Son and Narmada rivers to meet the Satpura Range in the Maikal Hills near Amarkantak.
Geologically, the lower valley of the Son is an extension of the Narmada Valley, and the Kaimur Range an extension of the Vindhya Range.

Bundelkhand

JejakabhuktiBundelcundBundeli
The branch of the Vindhya range spanning across Bundelkhand is known as the Panna range.
Bundelkhand lies between the Indo-Gangetic Plain to the north and the Vindhya Range to the south.

Nishadas

NishadaNishada Kingdomnisaada
The Mahabharata mentions that the Nishadas and other Mleccha tribes reside in the forests of the Vindhyas.
Some of Vena's descendants became Nishadas and some others were called Mlechchhas, who resided on the Vindhya mountains (12,58).

Gujarat

Gujarat StateGujarat, IndiaGujrat
Depending on the definition, the range extends up to Gujarat in the west, Uttar Pradesh and Bihar in the north and Chhattisgarh in the east.
Gujarat has some of the major mountain ranges of India, including Aravalli, Sahyadri (Western Ghats), Vindhya and Saputara.

Ganges

GangaGanges RiverGanga River
According to the various definitions mentioned in the older texts, the Vindhyas extend up to Godavari in the south and Ganges in the north.
The Ganges basin ranges from the Himalaya and the Transhimalaya in the north, to the northern slopes of the Vindhya range in the south, from the eastern slopes of the Aravalli in the west to the Chota Nagpur plateau and the Sunderbans delta in the east.

Pariyatra Mountains

PariyatraPáripátraPāriyātra
Several ancient Indian texts and inscriptions (e.g. the Nasik Prasasti of Gautamiputra Satakarni) mention three mountain ranges in Central India: Vindhya (or "Vindhya proper"), Rksa (also Rksavat or Riksha) and Pariyatra (or Paripatra).
It is otherwise identified to the north western part of what is now called as Vindhya mountain ranges.

Rewa Plateau

Rewa
The Rewa-Panna plateaus are also collectively known as the Vindhya plateau.
The Rewa Plateau lies between the Kaimur Range in the south and Vindhya Range or Binj Pahar in the north.

Betwa River

BetwaVetravatiBetwā
These include Chambal, Betwa, Dhasan, Ken, Tamsa, Kali Sindh and Parbati.
It rises in the Vindhya Range (Raisen) just north of Hoshangabad in Madhya Pradesh and flows north-east through Madhya Pradesh and Orchha to Uttar Pradesh.

Āryāvarta

Aryavartaancient IndiaAryavart
Several ancient texts mention the Vindhyas as the southern boundary of the Āryāvarta, the territory of the ancient Indo-Aryan peoples.
The Manusmṛti (2.22) gives the name to "the tract between the Himalaya and the Vindhya ranges, from the Eastern Sea (Bay of Bengal) to the Western Sea (Arabian Sea)".