Violence against LGBT people

homophobic violenceviolenceanti-gay violenceAnti-LGBT violenceanti-LGBTQ violenceLGBT violencepersecution of homosexualstransphobic violenceanti-gay hate crimeshate crimes
Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) people can face violence motivated by hateful attitudes towards their sexuality or gender identity.wikipedia
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Societal attitudes toward homosexuality

societal attitudes towards homosexualitypromotion of homosexualityhomosexuality with pedophilia
These actions may be motivated by homophobia, lesbophobia, biphobia, transphobia, and may be influenced by cultural, religious, or political mores and biases.
Homophobic attitudes in society can manifest themselves in the form of anti-LGBT discrimination, opposition to LGBT rights, anti-LGBT hate speech, and violence against LGBT people.

LGBT rights in South Africa

South Africagay rightsLGBT history in South Africa
Outside the West, many countries, particularly those where the dominant religion is Islam, most African countries (excluding South Africa), most Asian countries (excluding the largely LGBT-friendly countries of Israel, Japan, Taiwan, Thailand and the Philippines) and some former-Communist countries in Eastern Europe and Central Asia, such as Russia, Poland, Serbia, Albania, Kosovo, Montenegro and Bosnia and Herzegovina, are currently deemed to be potentially dangerous to their LGBT population because of prevalent discrimination against homosexuals which influences both discriminatory legislation and physical violence.
Nevertheless, LGBT South Africans, particularly those outside of the major cities, continue to face some challenges, including homophobic violence (particularly corrective rape), and high rates of HIV/AIDS infection.

LGBT rights in Europe

EuropeEastern EuropeEuropean standards
Outside the West, many countries, particularly those where the dominant religion is Islam, most African countries (excluding South Africa), most Asian countries (excluding the largely LGBT-friendly countries of Israel, Japan, Taiwan, Thailand and the Philippines) and some former-Communist countries in Eastern Europe and Central Asia, such as Russia, Poland, Serbia, Albania, Kosovo, Montenegro and Bosnia and Herzegovina, are currently deemed to be potentially dangerous to their LGBT population because of prevalent discrimination against homosexuals which influences both discriminatory legislation and physical violence.
Homosexual behaviour, called sodomy, was considered a capital crime in most European countries, and thousands of homosexual men were executed across Europe during waves of persecution in these centuries.

LGBT rights by country or territory

gay rightsLGBT rightsequality
Violence may be executed by the state, as in laws prescribing corporal punishment for homosexual acts (see homosexuality laws), or by individuals engaging in intimidation, mobbing, assault, or lynching (see gay bashing, trans bashing).

Persecution of homosexuals in Nazi Germany

Persecution of homosexuals in Nazi Germany and the HolocausthomosexualsHistory of gay men in Nazi Germany and the Holocaust
In Nazi Germany, homosexuals were among the groups targeted by the Holocaust (See Persecution of homosexuals in Nazi Germany and the Holocaust).
In 2005, the European Parliament adopted a resolution on the Holocaust which included the persecution of homosexuals.

History of violence against LGBT people in the United States

violence against LGBT peopleViolence against LGBT people in the United Statesviolence against LGBT people in U.S. history
By comparison, the FBI reported five homophobic murders in the United States during 2008, corresponding to 0.03% of intentional homicides (homicide rate 5.4 per 100,000 population as of 2008).
The history of violence against LGBT people in the United States is made up of assaults on gay men, lesbians, bisexual, and transgender individuals (LGBT), legal responses to such violence, and hate crime statistics in the United States of America.

Homophobia

homophobichomophobeanti-gay
These actions may be motivated by homophobia, lesbophobia, biphobia, transphobia, and may be influenced by cultural, religious, or political mores and biases. Outside the West, many countries, particularly those where the dominant religion is Islam, most African countries (excluding South Africa), most Asian countries (excluding the largely LGBT-friendly countries of Israel, Japan, Taiwan, Thailand and the Philippines) and some former-Communist countries in Eastern Europe and Central Asia, such as Russia, Poland, Serbia, Albania, Kosovo, Montenegro and Bosnia and Herzegovina, are currently deemed to be potentially dangerous to their LGBT population because of prevalent discrimination against homosexuals which influences both discriminatory legislation and physical violence.
Homophobia is observable in critical and hostile behavior such as discrimination and violence on the basis of sexual orientations that are non-heterosexual.

Lesbophobia

anti-lesbianforce themselves on lesbianslesbophobic
These actions may be motivated by homophobia, lesbophobia, biphobia, transphobia, and may be influenced by cultural, religious, or political mores and biases.

Trans bashing

anti-transgender violenceTrans-bashingtransphobic bullying and violence
Violence may be executed by the state, as in laws prescribing corporal punishment for homosexual acts (see homosexuality laws), or by individuals engaging in intimidation, mobbing, assault, or lynching (see gay bashing, trans bashing).

Gay bashing

gay-bashinggay bashershomophobic bullying
Violence may be executed by the state, as in laws prescribing corporal punishment for homosexual acts (see homosexuality laws), or by individuals engaging in intimidation, mobbing, assault, or lynching (see gay bashing, trans bashing).

Giovanni di Giovanni

In Florence, a young boy named Giovanni di Giovanni (1350–1365?) was castrated and burned between the thighs with a red-hot iron by court order under this law.

Stop Murder Music

Reggae Compassionate Actmurder musicReggae Compassion Act
Gay rights advocates have started the group Stop Murder Music to combat what they say is the promotion of hate and violence by artists.
The campaign accuses these artists of promoting violence against LGBT people through the lyrics in their music and attempts to stop this.

Significant acts of violence against LGBT people

anti-gay attackgay hate crimesGisberta Salce
This is a list of notable homophobic, biphobic and transphobic violence.

History of violence against LGBT people in the United Kingdom

UK violence against LGBT people
The history of violence against LGBT people in the United Kingdom is made up of assaults on gay men, lesbians, bisexual, transgender, queer and intersexed individuals (LGBTQI), legal responses to such violence, and hate crime statistics in the United Kingdom.

Education sector responses to LGBT violence

Overall, education sector responses tend to focus on homophobia and violence linked to sexual orientation and gender identity/expression, and less on transphobia.

Heterosexism

heterosexistheterocentricanti-gay
Furthermore, in interviews with perpetrators of anti-gay violence, forensic psychologist Karen Franklin points out that "heterosexism is not just a personal value system, [rather] it is a tool in the maintenance of gender dichotomy."

LGBT rights in the United States

LGBT rightsgay rightsLGBTQ rights
In many parts of the world, including much of the European Union and United States, acts of violence are legally classified as hate crimes, which entail harsher sentences if convicted.

Sizzla

Sizzla KalonjiJudgement Yard
As a result of the strong anti-homosexual culture in Jamaica, many reggae and dancehall artists, such as Buju Banton, Elephant Man, Sizzla, have published song lyrics advocating violence against homosexuals.
OutRage!, a British LGBT rights group alleged that some of Sizzla's songs contain lyrics that advocate violence against LGBT people.

Orlando nightclub shooting

2016 Orlando nightclub shooting2016 Orlando gay nightclub shootingPulse nightclub shooting
The 2016 Orlando nightclub shooting was at the time the deadliest mass shooting by an individual and remains the deadliest incident of violence against LGBT people in U.S. history.

Omar Mateen

Mateen, Omar Mir SeddiqueOmar Mir Seddique MateenA gunman
On June 12, 2016, Omar Mateen killed 49 people and wounded more than 50 at Pulse gay nightclub in Orlando, Florida.

Corrective rape

corrective rapedcorrective" rapescorrectively raped

Matthew Shepard

Matthew Shephardmurder of Matthew ShepardJudy Shephard
* Violence against LGBT people

Yogyakarta Principles

The Yogyakarta PrinciplesYogyakarta Principles plus 10Yogyakarta Principles on the Application of International Human Rights Law in Relation to Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity